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Old 03-19-2015, 07:29 AM
 
4,477 posts, read 4,738,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garthur View Post
Out of the 20 or so people that I know that retired voluntarily, not one has developed any health problems that I know of. Both myself and my wife have been retired now for more then 5 years and our general health is better then when we were working. Just before typing this both of us just came in the door from a 4 mile walk. When I was still working I couldn't walk a mile without getting tired and since I have retired my weight has decreased by 25 pounds. My BP and cholesterol are lower. When I was working I was having panic attacks, I don't have them any more.

I don't believe a word in the article.

People that are forced to retire before they are ready would have health problems, but if retirement was on your own then you should not have health issues. The people that retire because they don't feel well enough to continue working have already started the down hill trek to bad health, they just don't what's wrong with them yet.

bravo for you and your better health. I agree with you, none of the people I know that retired are in ill health at all. My mother retired 19 years ago and at 85 now she is thriving. Actually, she puts me to shame when we go out hiking.
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Old 03-20-2015, 04:36 AM
 
1,958 posts, read 2,711,399 times
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I have read, over and over, that an important factor for good health, all our adult lives, is a good, happy marriage (especially beneficial for the men) or being happily single. And I tend to think that's true. Some of you marrieds here have posted over the years and seem to be happily married. That could be a big factor in your good health in retirement.

Also, no one here seems to live in a retirement community/CCRC. I did recently, for 2.5 years, and it wasn't a good experience (for me). A lot of couples were unhappily married and in bad health or widowed/single and in bad health. [And yet I've been corresponding with a long-retired non-Catholic priest in New England. His wife passed very recently, at a ripe old age, and he himself is what we consider 'elderly'. He (and she, before she died, of course) has lived in a very up-scale CCRC for a LONG time, and he has loved it. He also is very active and very social.]

Once I moved out of my retirement community here in NM, my health improved greatly. Now I have an opportunity to move into one of two different retirement communities here and two in San Diego County (CA), and I've been dragging my feet. (Part of that, though, has been due to a broken shoulder and hand. A neighbor's dog tripped me.) Altho' all four of them are very nice (and one in SD is only 5 blocks from the beach! LOL), I find myself hyperventilating every time I seriously think of moving into one of them (a bit of an exaggeration but still . . . .).

I think a happy and good retirement lies in doing what we want to do (obviously) and doing it. Whether that is golfing every day or going back to work FT/PT or starting our own FT/PT business. And being happily married or single/widowed/divorced.

I also think that people with enough money (not necessarily rich, but people with enough money to not have to worry about finances) tend to have a happier and healthier retirement, and, as pointed out on another thread, obviously most (or all) of us here have enough money or more than enough money.

But I find I find it interesting, in this book I'm reading -- the author (a prominent sociologist) states that a lot of us retireds live in denial: we're not as happy OR healthy as we tell others -- or even our own selves. In other words, we put on a 'good front'. And I think that may be true for some of us (not just here but all retired US citizens), but not all of us. And, yet, a lot has been written about the anonymity of the social media boards and how we can lie and create a false self and do so without any repercussions. (In other words, we can lie with impunity.) And I'm sure some of us have done that.

I find this all so interesting.

Regardless, government stats state that 50% of us who are 65 today (the younger old) have a 50/50 chance of dying before 85. And while I've always hoped to 'get out' while the getting is good (before 80), that's a sobering thought: Just exactly what do I want to do and accomplish in the (relatively) few years I have left. I'm 66 -- the olds are pretty good that I won't be here in 19 years. :-) (I can only hope. LOL) Well, I just re-enrolled in college last week! LOL THAT is something I've been wanting to do and just the thought of it makes me smile and my heart happy. :-)

To leave on a more upbeat note: In this current issue of "Spirituality and Health" magazine (I don't normally read it but the title of an article on the cover caught my eye), there is an article re 90- to 110-year-olds who are still going strong. [There is a man in his 90s (and I think the author actually gives his name) who is currently touring The US in his RV, alone. :-) And my ex-BF just turned 78 and is still down-hill skiing.] Certainly they are anomalies and their longevity has a lot to do with their genes, but I don't think genes are ever the whole story.

May all of you LONG retirements -- in extremely good health!
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Old 03-20-2015, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,296 posts, read 4,148,032 times
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Since it's my job which keeps me sedentary and makes it all but impossible for me to have an active social life, I think retirement will be good for my health!

I do think folks need to plan for activities in retirement, lest they fall into the trap of wasting away in front of the TV all day. But since there are so many worthy volunteer activities out there, as well as many different clubs/hobby groups to join, that's not so very hard to do.
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Old 03-20-2015, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post

But I find I find it interesting, in this book I'm reading -- the author (a prominent sociologist) states that a lot of us retireds live in denial: we're not as happy OR healthy as we tell others -- or even our own selves. In other words, we put on a 'good front'. And I think that may be true for some of us (not just here but all retired US citizens), but not all of us. And, yet, a lot has been written about the anonymity of the social media boards and how we can lie and create a false self and do so without any repercussions. (In other words, we can lie with impunity.) And I'm sure some of us have done that.
Much food for thought in your long post, Fran66, but I have chosen just the one paragraph above to comment on. It's interesting to me how, over time, we eventually get a sense of who some of the regular posters are. I believe that most of them are honest, straight-forward people, although naturally that's not something susceptible to proof. I have found that most Retirement Forum posters are willing to share their doubts, their frustrations, their problems, the mistakes they have made, etc., which is why I believe they are not putting on a "false front". Of course there are a few exceptions. One person in particular seems to be able to leap tall buildings in a single bound, and when I consider his (or maybe her, but I vote for a male) posts over a period of years, they are just not credible as a whole.
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Old 03-20-2015, 11:30 AM
 
1,958 posts, read 2,711,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Much food for thought in your long post, Fran66, but I have chosen just the one paragraph above to comment on. It's interesting to me how, over time, we eventually get a sense of who some of the regular posters are. I believe that most of them are honest, straight-forward people, although naturally that's not something susceptible to proof. I have found that most Retirement Forum posters are willing to share their doubts, their frustrations, their problems, the mistakes they have made, etc., which is why I believe they are not putting on a "false front". Of course there are a few exceptions. One person in particular seems to be able to leap tall buildings in a single bound, and when I consider his (or maybe her, but I vote for a male) posts over a period of years, they are just not credible as a whole.
I was waiting for you to weigh in.

I absolutely agree with you, from beginning to end. I also know that some members have met up with each other, and I tend to think that, if one were lying, one would not be open to a face-to-face meeting.

If I were to vote as to who was lying on here and who wasn't -- I wouldn't be able to think of one person. Not even the one you indicated (I have no idea who you are talking about). But since we all tend to 'embellish', if possible, every day of our lives, I think we do it here too -- if not often, certainly at times -- at least once in a while. I think it's called 'being human'.

As for lying to ourselves -- I'm not sure that's bad (unless it prevents us from seeing a doctor when we need to see one). I'd rather be in bad condition and lie to myself that it isn't so bad than be in a bad condition and telling myself that I'm at death's door. I meet positive, upbeat people everyday, who have conditions like RA, and yet -- they're out there working PT or volunteering. My dentist, who will admit that it might be somewhat psychosomatic, has a very painful nerve condition and has it for years -- even surgery didn't ameliorate it -- but you'd never know it unless she told you.

So I guess I'm saying that if lying to ourselves leads to a better, happier, more contented life in general (and a better marriage/relationship), I think it's fine to lie like H to ourselves. As for lying to others -- there are little white lies and big black lies -- :-) -- and everyone has to make the distinction for themselves and live with themselves.

Ok, I've got a pressing, non-retirement issue (not terribly important either), so I'm on to another topic/thread, and I'm going to busy for a while, so enjoy my absence once again.
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Old 03-20-2015, 03:23 PM
 
1,433 posts, read 720,135 times
Reputation: 3702
Quote:
Originally Posted by BayAreaHillbilly View Post
I can't wait to sleep in every day for 5 years straight. I suppose that is an expected sentiment given the fact I've been sleep deprived since I was 22 years old.

BTW - there is a theory that long term sleep deprivation is a factor in Alzheimer's. Hopefully the damage is not already done or at least not so bad there is no mitigation. I am hoping by eventually getting more sleep, I can delay some of the issues of aging a bit. So for me, I view retirement as being good for my health. I hope I get to retire some day.
It was for me

You have the right mindset.....when working I was never getting the right amount of sleep, working long hours, not exercising to any extent, etc.

Now I'm walking 3 miles a day, sleeping at least 8 hrs, eating better..... I feel so much better, restful & stress free. Plus not having to wake up at a set time.....happiness is not having to be awakened by an alarm clock!

Don't forget that work stress is a killer....also as I've also posted in the past, many people are sedentary at work and the most exercise they get is walking from and back to the car before/after work.
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Old 03-20-2015, 04:33 PM
 
10,812 posts, read 8,056,502 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luckyram View Post
It was for me

You have the right mindset.....when working I was never getting the right amount of sleep, working long hours, not exercising to any extent, etc.

Now I'm walking 3 miles a day, sleeping at least 8 hrs, eating better..... I feel so much better, restful & stress free. Plus not having to wake up at a set time.....happiness is not having to be awakened by an alarm clock!
Absolutely! Since retiring, I eat healthier, practice yoga, walk/jog 2-3 miles a day, strength-train 2x a week, and meditate daily. All of which likely contribute to how I now sleep like a baby.
And since I don't have to make arrangements at work to take off for preventative medical screening (colonoscopy, mammogram, skin cancer check, dental exams, etc.), I no longer procrastinate about scheduling them.

So how can retirement possibly be bad for my health??!!
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Old 03-20-2015, 04:45 PM
 
1,958 posts, read 2,711,399 times
Reputation: 3379
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
Absolutely! Since retiring, I eat healthier, practice yoga, walk/jog 2-3 miles a day, strength-train 2x a week, and meditate daily. All of which likely contribute to how I now sleep like a baby.
And since I don't have to make arrangements at work to take off for preventative medical screening (colonoscopy, mammogram, skin cancer check, dental exams, etc.), I no longer procrastinate about scheduling them.

So how can retirement possibly be bad for my health??!!
Depending on which source used, 9-13% of seniors are below the poverty line, and we all know what a joke the poverty line is. As has been said before, most of us here are relatively well off.

Retirement hasn't been particularly bad for my health either, but life is not all about us. The article was talking about most seniors, that's all.
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