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Old 03-19-2015, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,589,172 times
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Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
We have had great difficulties in finding either a new or updated/no-maintenance required SMALL home to relocate. It is even harder to find a nice small home with acreage. So unless we buy a lot and have a home built, we may end up having to buy a house bigger than what we want or need.

The same goes with single-level, one-story houses, almost all the ones we looked at are older ranch houses built in the 60's/70's. Aside from the houses being old which may need a lot of repairs and updates (wiring, plumbing), they are usually not energy efficient ...
Good luck with what you want. It's not being built because it's not in great demand and with land in most places being far more expense than the house a builder puts on it, there's no profit margin in building tiny houses on big lots.

One thing about renovating a 60s/70s ranch house to get what you want ... once the work is finished, it's finished and your home maintenance is minimal. The large lot will be be work forever more. A 90-year-old might well enjoy puttering in the garden and it no doubt is good therapy, but "puttering" isn't all that gardens require. Gardens are a huge amount of work, then there's the mowing, the weeding, the pruning and hauling, the tree trimming, the raking of leaves, the shoveling of snow (in some places), the clean-up after storms, and all other requirements of property maintenance. That looks a whole lot different to an 80-year-old than it looks to a 60-year-old.

My mother was still able to manage her 1950s Cape Cod house long after the maintenance of the outdoors and average-sized Pennsylvania home-lot became impossible for her to deal with. She lived in a small town and there weren't people available for hire to do these things and even when there were they weren't cost effective for her. Every season it was something different. Clean the gutters, repair the French drains, tree roots in the sewer line, etc., etc. I was driving the three-hour round trip from Pittsburgh once a week just to deal with her home-maintenance issues ... while I had my own home and full-time job to attend to.

People of financial means can make this stuff work. But elderly people with modest incomes more commonly allow their large lots to go to ruin at some point.
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Old 03-20-2015, 05:14 AM
 
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https://mlaem.fs.ml.com/content/dam/...f/AR6SX48F.pdf
Scroll to page 4 and read the methodology of the study and perhaps it won't be so surprising. The survey included a full age from their 20's-80's. They also did a over sampling of affluent folks not included in this survey and to be used later.
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Old 03-20-2015, 05:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
The house is the typical hype you see in "good retirement" articles. I was focused on the statistics, which rather surprised me, like how some 83% of retirees remain in their same state even if they relocate to another kind of dwelling. I would have imagined it would be more like 65%–70%.
The actual survey discusses and identifies retirement hot spots. Many people already live in the region so why move to another and many who might to move there can't afford to. There is a reason why those in the NE might transplant South and those in the South might stay put. New Jersey to the Carolina's/Florida probably more popular than the reverse.
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Old 03-20-2015, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,024,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
https://mlaem.fs.ml.com/content/dam/...f/AR6SX48F.pdf
Scroll to page 4 and read the methodology of the study and perhaps it won't be so surprising. The survey included a full age from their 20's-80's. They also did a over sampling of affluent folks not included in this survey and to be used later.
Throwing Gen X-ers and Mills into the research seems more than a bit odd. What you think you want at retirement, and what you actually do, can be vastly different. And the number in their sampling pool was not very high. Qualitative method means discussion, not actualities. So maybe the study is flawed.
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Old 03-20-2015, 06:40 AM
 
29,891 posts, read 34,951,892 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Throwing Gen X-ers and Mills into the research seems more than a bit odd. What you think you want at retirement, and what you actually do, can be vastly different. And the number in their sampling pool was not very high. Qualitative method means discussion, not actualities. So maybe the study is flawed.
As with most studies it isn't necessarily a flaw in the methodology but the application of the results. The actual study identifies relevant results by demographic like actually retired. I found the actual survey helpful. Having been around this forum for awhile it is obvious we are very different people in many ways of much of that is geographic and that often wags the income and experience tail.
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Old 03-20-2015, 06:41 AM
 
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DH and I were just discussing this. We would like a small (around 1300-1500 sf) well-designed, quality built, low maintenance house with enough land to garden. They are very hard to find around here so we are looking in some of the nearby small towns. I have also thought it would be interesting to find a small community of those types of home facing a large central garden area that could be shared among residents. Gated communites with pretentious houses are depressing to me. I think someday there will be a glut of over-sized houses because many younger people really have zero interest in that lifestyle.
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Old 03-20-2015, 06:57 AM
 
8,241 posts, read 11,954,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I think the problem is in relocating close to age 70. There is maybe a 7- to 10-year opportunity to be in that new place before age-related dysfunctions befall us in one way or another, and then we face another move, the final-final move, again. Those who wisely anticipated their senior year needs and bought their "retirement house" nearer to 50 to 55, even while still working, have a longer time to be in the new location and get the most out of it. So the question is, with maybe 7 to 10 years for the next place before the final-final, is it even worth it to move? We bought this house 3 years ago and these years flew by as will the next 3 years. At this point, maybe just stay put and THEN, when health issues take over, go into the final-final. Of course there are those who want a better climate at all costs, and I don't question them one bit.
You've mentioned this concept in the past and I don't agree with you at all. Frankly, I think it is ridiculous to move into a specific "retirement house" in your 50s because you're worried what you will and won't be able to do 15-30 years in the future. My philosophy is when you're in you're 50s you should live where and how you want based on what you're going to be doing in your 50s (and perhaps your 60s). If it won't work for you when you become elderly, then you deal with that at that time.

I bought a two-story house in Las Vegas at age 54 when I first retired because I was a beautiful house in a beautiful development. It is patently ridiculous to think that I shouldn't have moved there because 20 years down the road I may not be able to climb stairs.

Do you really think that people should be house-hunting in their 50s only for places that would definitely work for them in their 70s and 80s? Maybe its because my wife and I have lived in nine different houses/THs/condos in 5 different locales over the past 35 years, but I don't see relocating as a very big deal. I'm sure we'll have a few more moves in our future as well. I'm certainly not going to plan now for end-of-life concerns or age-related dysfunctions. When it happens it happens.
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Old 03-20-2015, 07:02 AM
 
29,891 posts, read 34,951,892 times
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Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
You've mentioned this concept in the past and I don't agree with you at all. Frankly, I think it is ridiculous to move into a specific "retirement house" in your 50s because you're worried what you will and won't be able to do 15-30 years in the future. My philosophy is when you're in you're 50s you should live where and how you want based on what you're going to be doing in your 50s (and perhaps your 60s). If it won't work for you when you become elderly, then you deal with that at that time.

I bought a two-story house in Las Vegas at age 54 when I first retired because I was a beautiful house in a beautiful development. It is patently ridiculous to think that I shouldn't have moved there because 20 years down the road I may not be able to climb stairs.

Do you really think that people should be house-hunting in their 50s only for places that would definitely work for them in their 70s and 80s? Maybe its because my wife and I have lived in nine different houses/THs/condos in 5 different locales over the past 35 years, but I don't see relocating as a very big deal. I'm sure we'll have a few more moves in our future as well. I'm certainly not going to plan now for end-of-life concerns or age-related dysfunctions. When it happens it happens.
I am learning that we came from a different culture and mindset. We have lived with tremendous changes in housing, growth, population etc. Change is second nature to us. Wife and I know have several more moves and they have movers for tha.
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Old 03-20-2015, 07:04 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 19,024,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
You've mentioned this concept in the past and I don't agree with you at all. Frankly, I think it is ridiculous to move into a specific "retirement house" in your 50s because you're worried what you will and won't be able to do 15-30 years in the future. My philosophy is when you're in you're 50s you should live where and how you want based on what you're going to be doing in your 50s (and perhaps your 60s). If it won't work for you when you become elderly, then you deal with that at that time.

I bought a two-story house in Las Vegas at age 54 when I first retired because I was a beautiful house in a beautiful development. It is patently ridiculous to think that I shouldn't have moved there because 20 years down the road I may not be able to climb stairs.

Do you really think that people should be house-hunting in their 50s only for places that would definitely work for them in their 70s and 80s? Maybe its because my wife and I have lived in nine different houses/THs/condos in 5 different locales over the past 35 years, but I don't see relocating as a very big deal. I'm sure we'll have a few more moves in our future as well. I'm certainly not going to plan now for end-of-life concerns or age-related dysfunctions. When it happens it happens.
That's just my perspective. It's possible that my time flies faster than yours, and also I see many my age who are not as spry as you. I see folks at 65+ with moderate to serious health concerns, replacement hips and knees, etc who are not all that anxious to keep relocating. If one wants adventure and can take it on, it may be more fun (and practical) to settle into the retirement home in the great (undiscovered?) location as early as possible and then travel the world and do home exchanges for as many years as possible.
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Old 03-20-2015, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Idaho
1,458 posts, read 1,162,142 times
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Originally Posted by Jukesgrrl View Post
The large lot will be work forever more. A 90-year-old might well enjoy puttering in the garden and it no doubt is good therapy, but "puttering" isn't all that gardens require. Gardens are a huge amount of work, then there's the mowing, the weeding, the pruning and hauling, the tree trimming, the raking of leaves, the shoveling of snow (in some places), the clean-up after storms, and all other requirements of property maintenance. That looks a whole lot different to an 80-year-old than it looks to a 60-year-old.
Our current home has 1A of land adjacent to a 70A wooded area in NY so we know all about mowing, leaf raking and snow removing ;-)

My mother used to live in a house with 6A of land. They loved gardening and had enough produce to feed a small town. She now lives with my sister in a 1A home and they both love gardening. They converted the lawn into like an English garden in the front and the backyard is a veg/flower garden. They were thrilled that a garden tour bus stopped at their house last summer and asked their permission for a tour.

We are pretty realistic and don't have any illusion about being to maintain the same lifestyle forever. We want to extend/expand our current lifestyle sans work demand in a milder climate close to our daughter. Why worry about what you may not be able to do 20 years from now and limit or force yourself into a 'foreign' living condition However, at our ages, the possibility of one of us may become temporarily disabled due an accident, an unexpected medical issues etc. is high so we are trying to avoid having to buy a multi-level home.
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