U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-29-2015, 08:03 PM
 
6,307 posts, read 4,755,565 times
Reputation: 12919

Advertisements

Graywhiskers, that is a sad story which unfortunately matches much of my own experience. Others might think we are just old curmudgeons but sadly technical leadership in the US has had a huge decline. The sciences have also declined. Post Sputnik, we realized that we were falling behind the Soviets in many areas. The Federal government worked to improve science education in the US. These improvements included teacher training and curriculum development. All of those improvements faded into the distant past and we are again sinking to a low level. It is not just a matter of education. Scientists and engineers are fools who work hard for relatively little pay and definitely for little respect.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-29-2015, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Retired
648 posts, read 498,737 times
Reputation: 1057
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Graywhiskers, that is a sad story which unfortunately matches much of my own experience. Others might think we are just old curmudgeons but sadly technical leadership in the US has had a huge decline. The sciences have also declined. Post Sputnik, we realized that we were falling behind the Soviets in many areas. The Federal government worked to improve science education in the US. These improvements included teacher training and curriculum development. All of those improvements faded into the distant past and we are again sinking to a low level. It is not just a matter of education. Scientists and engineers are fools who work hard for relatively little pay and definitely for little respect.
jrkliny, I agree totally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2015, 07:28 AM
 
6,307 posts, read 4,755,565 times
Reputation: 12919
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewToCA View Post
Dept of Defense
As I expected.

For many of us the demands of the workplace became more and more and more. For the past couple of generations, businesses have pushed for improved efficiency in order to survive and compete. As workers, managers or even owners, our work lives have become much more difficult. Only those in government or non-profit industries seem to be immune and rarely understand what has happened elsewhere.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2015, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Florida -
8,767 posts, read 10,859,665 times
Reputation: 16640
Early on, I remember thinking that older workers knew 'secrets' that somehow enabled them to be more confident in the workplace. Over the years, I learned that the difference was that they did know more - and that I knew a lot less than I thought I did.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2015, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,993 posts, read 7,766,040 times
Reputation: 12226
It became easier to make money. Quality of life improved. Negative was that I was in high tech sales and it was volatile so one had to not take it personal. One had to see the hand writing on the wall so one knew when to move on. I worked for more companies then the average person.

At age 46 I decided I was a dinosaur in a young persons business (high tech) so I got out and bought a small business. I loved every minute of owning my own business. Fortunately I had a wife with a good job and I was covered under her benefits. We also had no children so we did not have that expense and burden.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2015, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,699 posts, read 33,718,482 times
Reputation: 51946
Worked for the same government agency for 34 years in various jobs and in different locations. The last job before I retired wasn't my favorite job because in my mind, it wasn't the most important/challenging/stressful job I ever had in the agency, but it paid the most because I was dealing with more bigwigs. I didn't miss it at all when I retired but not because it was more stressful but because it wasn't stressful at all. It was too easy for me. I had deadlines to meet but they weren't difficult to meet, there was little competitiveness (which I like) about it and the work just didn't require inventiveness or much analysis. Had I had the last job earlier in my career, I would have looked for something more challenging, however, I wanted more money going into retirement so I took the job...and had no qualms about leaving it to retire and go on to a new adventure in a new location.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2015, 01:54 PM
 
10,387 posts, read 9,397,617 times
Reputation: 16004
Easier as far as business equipment is concerned. For example, back in the 60s using a typewriter was a pain when we utilized multi layers of carbon paper, had to correct typos, and especially when the boss wanted to delete or add text in a document. Once we were given word processors in the 80s we felt as though we were 'playing' instead of working when preparing documents.

Worse as far as the stress level. There was more stress in the latter years working in a corporate environment with all its rules, regulations, and management trying to dictate how employees should walk and talk. In my early years of office work it was a much more casual and relaxed environment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2015, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,993 posts, read 7,766,040 times
Reputation: 12226
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowtired14 View Post
I'm only two years from retirement, so I'm close enough to have experienced the difference. The biggest difference I've seen over my career is that 35 years ago I went to work, put in my day and went home. Today, with the advent of the internet and cell phones and linked emails, we seem to be "on the job" 24/7. I get messages at all hours, and when I'm on "vacation", and the company has no qualms about contacting me. Of course all this and no extra pay as I'm on salary. Thi is becoming the norm in a lot of jobs for the kids today, and I'm not sure that's a good thing.
Well said.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2015, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Sacramento
13,784 posts, read 23,821,383 times
Reputation: 6195
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
As I expected.

For many of us the demands of the workplace became more and more and more. For the past couple of generations, businesses have pushed for improved efficiency in order to survive and compete. As workers, managers or even owners, our work lives have become much more difficult. Only those in government or non-profit industries seem to be immune and rarely understand what has happened elsewhere.
I disagree with you there, in my own work environment there were plenty of upheavals, displacements and downsizing problems. We had required efficiency improvement targets, and budgets were cut in advance in assuming you'd achieve the objectives. Personnel ceilings were repeatedly slashed, and the "do more with less" chant was frequently echoed throughout the organizations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-30-2015, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
6,130 posts, read 9,095,981 times
Reputation: 11545
I spent most of my career in social work, and in the beginning, I wanted to change the world and be a do-gooder everywhere.I easily conformed to the rules and things were good. As time went on and I learned more about what makes people tick, I realized this was a very foolish goal and I burned out of social work, went on to journalism and stayed there for many years.

But, there too, I encountered seriously deficient managers, bosses and know it alls, who wanted to be rulers and I have always resented this in supervisors. Work got alot harder for me toward the end, because I was privy to all the stupid unreasonable stuff that went on, knowing that it really did not have to be that way. In the end, it was easier to just "give up" than to try to make things better for me or others there. Retirement was a blessing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top