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Old 03-30-2015, 04:56 PM
 
194 posts, read 300,545 times
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I am a Boomer and I certainly understand children not wanting sets of china from their parents/grandparents. What young people have time to have formal sit down meals? With the busy schedules of most young folks, it is grab a bite out the door. I don't believe that many families still host formal dinners where one would use fine china. It would only sit in a cabinet gathering dust. Not saying this is right or wrong, but just my opinion.
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Old 03-30-2015, 04:57 PM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,286,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
I don't know why people think this is a "millennial" thing. Hell I am a boomer...and my house is way smaller than my parents. All 3 of us kids have more stuff than we need, of our own. No way can we absorb our parents possessions!
When my parents married... their apartment was all hand me downs... anyone remember cinder block bricks for a bookshelf...

Nothing was new and they were grateful family and friends offered and were able to lend a hand.

Mom's first purchase was a sofa in 1960... she still has it and no... it is not the kind no one can sit on.

In 1967 as a Christmas present to each other they bought a frost free refrigerator freezer and in 1969 the same with a Dryer and both mom still uses today...

Furniture, bedding, appliances, clothes were almost all hand me downs and we were glad to have them...

I think the difference today is kids can go out and buy what they want... and they are not limited to a single Sears Charge Card for the entire family shopping...

Starting with nothing fosters an appreciation that is hard for those that never experienced it.

Last edited by Ultrarunner; 03-30-2015 at 05:21 PM..
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Old 03-30-2015, 05:13 PM
 
10,813 posts, read 8,061,664 times
Reputation: 17025
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
I
But it does seem that a lot of what was handed down through the generations was fine quality and it was appreciated. That's why they kept it. The sterling silver--it was admired. The fine china, same thing. Beautiful paintings, hand carved furniture. Today they would turn down the sterling or just have it melted down for money. They don't want the bone china or the fine art. THAT is something I just don't get. They'll take 1950s plastic kitsch but turn down gt grandmother's hand painted bone china.
When we were in our 50's, DH & I between us had 3 childless aunts die and leave us their stuff, which included sterling silver, crystal, and bone china. We sold it as fast as we could, we would have donated it to the thrift store if we had to, it's just not us. If only it had been vintage Fiesta ware, instead.

When my mom died a few years later, I put dibs on her 1970s ironstone dinnerware that she had collected through a grocery store promotion. I had searched for it for years in thrift stores and on ebay but could only pick up a few pieces and Mom wouldn't part with hers while she was living. Now it's all mine!
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Old 03-30-2015, 05:15 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,301,089 times
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Ultra, I remember those bookcases

biscuitmom, what is the name of that ironstone pattern? You and I may have the same set!
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Old 03-31-2015, 02:07 AM
 
Location: England
24,798 posts, read 6,170,208 times
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I fully expect the junk, I mean collectables my wife owns to end up in the bin when she dies. Her daughter, and my sons have no interest in her collection of pottery pigs - there is a display cabinet full of them. Plus the Lladro statuettes lovingly dragged back from Spanish holidays which adorn every spare shelf in the house. I myself have my own collecting addiction..... old movie books from the 40s and 50s. They sit forlornly on the big top shelf in my wardrobe. I used to think there would always be folks interested in Clark Gable and Lana Turner. I was wrong.......... No doubt they will go to the same landfill my mother's 'treasures' went to when she died.
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Old 03-31-2015, 08:39 AM
 
10,813 posts, read 8,061,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
Ultra, I remember those bookcases

biscuitmom, what is the name of that ironstone pattern? You and I may have the same set!
I don't know if it ever had a name. It's brown with muted olive green and turquoise rings on the rims. The color is so like Franciscan Madeira that I believe it was intentional. Madeira was big in the 70s-80s and I have a set. The Madeira and the grocery store ironstone mix and match well with my faux-Fiesta turquoise, gold, and green pieces.
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Old 03-31-2015, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Utah
546 posts, read 325,283 times
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If I died tomorrow, my biggest concern would be that my dogs don't end up in a shelter, that someone would take them in and care for them, or find someone who would. My husband would not be interested in keeping them. My stuff? Whatever.

With that said, I would hope my daughter would sort through things to try to find anything of monetary value she could cash in on, OR anything of mine that would remind her of me and times we shared, would warm her heart and maybe help her miss me a little less.

When my own mother passed away suddenly, I wasn't interested in her furniture or dishes. I didn't need to have her whole collection of X, having a couple around is enough to remind me of her. My daughter will possibly feel the same about my collection of Y.

Now I have "stuff" I have a particular attachment to, things I have held onto through multiple moves, etc. I'm really bad about hanging onto things that were gifted to me by people I care about. If I still have it from 3rd grade, I'm going to have it til the day I die.

One thing I do plan to do is have more of these special items worked into my overall decor when my husband and I move. Any family or friends that visit may ask about (or they already know) the story behind these things. It may mean these become things that people take to remember me by. If not, that's okay too. Some things will only have a special meaning to me, and when I die, that specialness goes away. So be it... It's just stuff.
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Old 03-31-2015, 09:00 AM
 
9,680 posts, read 15,861,934 times
Reputation: 16028
Quote:
Originally Posted by English Dave View Post
I fully expect the junk, I mean collectables my wife owns to end up in the bin when she dies. Her daughter, and my sons have no interest in her collection of pottery pigs - there is a display cabinet full of them. Plus the Lladro statuettes lovingly dragged back from Spanish holidays which adorn every spare shelf in the house. I myself have my own collecting addiction..... old movie books from the 40s and 50s. They sit forlornly on the big top shelf in my wardrobe. I used to think there would always be folks interested in Clark Gable and Lana Turner. I was wrong.......... No doubt they will go to the same landfill my mother's 'treasures' went to when she died.

Don't get rid of the pigs! Are they Shawnee, Smiley pigs? I have a collection of them, too. At least try to sell them on Ebay. The price they would fetch has gone way down, and the market is not hot for them, like it used to be, but they will bring something.........I hope
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Old 03-31-2015, 09:32 AM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,297 posts, read 15,347,934 times
Reputation: 9468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
When my parents married... their apartment was all hand me downs... anyone remember cinder block bricks for a bookshelf...

Nothing was new and they were grateful family and friends offered and were able to lend a hand.

Mom's first purchase was a sofa in 1960... she still has it and no... it is not the kind no one can sit on.

In 1967 as a Christmas present to each other they bought a frost free refrigerator freezer and in 1969 the same with a Dryer and both mom still uses today...

Furniture, bedding, appliances, clothes were almost all hand me downs and we were glad to have them...

I think the difference today is kids can go out and buy what they want... and they are not limited to a single Sears Charge Card for the entire family shopping...

Starting with nothing fosters an appreciation that is hard for those that never experienced it.
Part of that, though, is that pre-"throw away society" or pre-"brought in on a boat from China", the prices of appliances and furniture were much higher.
1960 10" TV - $169
1960 fridge - $600
1960 washer - $235

adjust those for inflation (via the CPI calculator) and you get a $1,400 TV, a $4,800 fridge and an $1,800 washing machine. And that is not including the hedonic adjustment for the increase in functionality (economists like to adjust prices upward for changes in functionality but never seem to adjust prices downward because many new items don't last the way they did in 1960). My last 36" TV was $400, the fridge we needed when we moved here was $2,000 and the washer and dryer were about $800.

Of course, wages have been stagnant (at best) since about 1980, which the falling prices of good somewhat hides. The was the trade-off, cheap mass-produced offshore goods for jobs (particularly manufacturing jobs that people - mostly men - could get straight out of high school without shelling out a minimum of $50,000 for a 4 yr degree).

Also things like food - in 1960, the average household spent 18% of its income on food (both eating at home and eating out). Now it is 8%.
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Old 03-31-2015, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Durham, NC
2,024 posts, read 5,329,171 times
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While I posted up-thread about pruning my Mom's collection of antiques (keep) and junk (pitch), I didn't touch on photos.

I inherited thousands upon thousands of photos. After getting rid of duplicates, I shipped them off to a picture scanning company in Arizona. A few weeks later, I had all the photos organized and digitized... available to me on my devices anywhere I go.

Instead of throwing out the originals, I gave those to my great-aunts, who cherish printed photos and loved going through them all.

But like many in my age group, I don't want boxes of old photos sitting around. Give me digital photos I can access anywhere.

True story: my wife and I took our nieces and nephew to Walt Disney World last fall. While going down Main Street, I saw a flower bed where I remembered sitting as a kid. Pulled out my smartphone, and 45 seconds later, I had a scanned photo of me from 30 years back pulled up to share with everyone. What a great memory to get to relive.
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