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Old 04-03-2015, 09:46 PM
 
4,451 posts, read 2,624,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCc girl View Post
Yup, Transplant, that's what I meant. Harvest Gold. Thanks.

I have two slimline phones in almond. Great for power outages. They are keepers.
Yes, My father still has the 1976 "Harvest Gold" GE side-by-side {sans icemaker} fridge in the kitchen. My mother worked part time and saved long and hard for the $600 for that beauty. It's been repaired by my father a few times, but still runs like a charm, though it may be an energy hog. He was an engineer and can fix many things, but I am not.
I bought a replacement dryer top lint trap in "harvest gold" about 5 years ago before the dryer gave up the ghost finally, turns out we had an ALMOND dryer!

We have a HARD WIRED LAND LINE PHONE {gasp!}, modern enough to have caller ID in it, and push button tones, but it is the only phone in the neighborhood that works when the power goes out! Even our fancy cell phones DON'T Work if there is no power to the towers!

I think America is oversold. used to be "have one of everything" for the family{like a car}, then it became "have two of everything" for the family{one car for dad and one for mother}, and then now it is "one for each person" in the family{a car for each driver!}, but that is changing as noted as housing costs go up and size goes down again, and youngers are shuning cars in favor in innercity public transpo.

Kids today, or even any young folk past booners, don't seem to appreciate or 'value' anything anymore. They DO collect video games that once played to the max level, they trade/sell/throw out to get a "new one" to play.
Only the war babies, and the boomers are buying the "collectibles' that remind them of their youth or something mother or grandmother had.

And many things are NOT worth keeping/collecting...who wants an old wringer washer? or a wash scrub board and tub? {for those who even know what a wringer or washtub is}. I have one at my father's and it HAS come in handy sometimes as it still works, but I wouldn't want to wash with it every day! Will I keep it? dunno. We will see.

And, finally, there is the "throw away factor". If it doesn't work any longer, throw it out, its cheaper to get a new one. Or a newer 'improved, updated' model as the old one is out of date and not 'serviced' anymore{like a computer}.
ANd the "modernize it" factor. Old cars on the TV shows are often "updated'' with the latest gadgets and conveniences for the customers {cruise, a/c,power windows,etc EFI, computer controlled everything, etc} so they are "fun' as an oldie, but 'comfortable for today's living"--like adding a modern bath to an old farmhouse with an outhouse, or electrifying it's gasoliers!

ah, the days of old, long, long ago, when knights roamed the paths on their trusty steeds...
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Old 04-03-2015, 10:03 PM
 
Location: MID ATLANTIC
7,742 posts, read 18,644,042 times
Reputation: 8414
For two decades I have been saddled with an antique chia cabinet with curved glass. Anyone going near the beast must be careful ("don't play with the dog in there!"). In that cabinet is the mother of all Hummel collections with Bee marks dating back to WWII. I've got the entire orchestra. In another cabinet (closed door) is my grandmother's china.

I have two boys (Gen y'ers or millenials?) that have no interest in this stuff.....oh, I forgot to mention all the boxes of cotume and rhinestone jewelry....anyway, these boys ha no interest. My first grandchild, a girl, will be here in July. I don't think she will have an interest in this stuff.

So why do I had it all? Because I know what it meant to my mother. Oddly enough, there's nothing I can think of that belongs to me that means as much as these items meant to her. I guess I probably should put them on consignment somewhere, but I doubt there's a market. So what to do?
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Old 04-04-2015, 01:45 AM
 
9,693 posts, read 15,888,099 times
Reputation: 16067
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmartMoney View Post
For two decades I have been saddled with an antique chia cabinet with curved glass. Anyone going near the beast must be careful ("don't play with the dog in there!"). In that cabinet is the mother of all Hummel collections with Bee marks dating back to WWII. I've got the entire orchestra. In another cabinet (closed door) is my grandmother's china.

I have two boys (Gen y'ers or millenials?) that have no interest in this stuff.....oh, I forgot to mention all the boxes of cotume and rhinestone jewelry....anyway, these boys ha no interest. My first grandchild, a girl, will be here in July. I don't think she will have an interest in this stuff.

So why do I had it all? Because I know what it meant to my mother. Oddly enough, there's nothing I can think of that belongs to me that means as much as these items meant to her. I guess I probably should put them on consignment somewhere, but I doubt there's a market. So what to do?
Start trying to sell it, maybe a piece at a time, depending on the market for such, and buy your new granddaughter a savings bond. By the time she's an adult she should have something substantial, better than trinkets that could break, have to be stored, tc.
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Old 04-04-2015, 05:38 AM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,315,799 times
Reputation: 7524
I do not work for them nor do I know if they are legit.............


Sell Hummel Figurines at iCollectHummel.com | Sell Hummel Figurines | Buy Hummel Figurines | Antique Hummel Figurines | Hummel Figurines Appraisal | Appraise Hummel Figurines | Hummel Figurines Value | Hummel Figurines Collectors
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Old 04-04-2015, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,575,594 times
Reputation: 27566
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmartMoney View Post
For two decades I have been saddled with an antique chia cabinet with curved glass. Anyone going near the beast must be careful ("don't play with the dog in there!"). In that cabinet is the mother of all Hummel collections with Bee marks dating back to WWII. I've got the entire orchestra. In another cabinet (closed door) is my grandmother's china.

I have two boys (Gen y'ers or millenials?) that have no interest in this stuff.....oh, I forgot to mention all the boxes of cotume and rhinestone jewelry....anyway, these boys ha no interest. My first grandchild, a girl, will be here in July. I don't think she will have an interest in this stuff.

So why do I had it all? Because I know what it meant to my mother. Oddly enough, there's nothing I can think of that belongs to me that means as much as these items meant to her. I guess I probably should put them on consignment somewhere, but I doubt there's a market. So what to do?
What it meant to your mother is important enough to you to still have it today.
Then keep it. Let the kids dispose of it after you are gone because it will mean nothing to them.

There's no new law saying you can't keep what you want. Generations before us had to clean out stuff and generations after us will do the same.

You only live once. Keep what you want.
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Old 04-04-2015, 09:25 AM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
8,367 posts, read 8,597,987 times
Reputation: 5919
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmartMoney View Post
For two decades I have been saddled with an antique chia cabinet with curved glass. Anyone going near the beast must be careful ("don't play with the dog in there!"). In that cabinet is the mother of all Hummel collections with Bee marks dating back to WWII. I've got the entire orchestra. In another cabinet (closed door) is my grandmother's china.

I have two boys (Gen y'ers or millenials?) that have no interest in this stuff.....oh, I forgot to mention all the boxes of cotume and rhinestone jewelry....anyway, these boys ha no interest. My first grandchild, a girl, will be here in July. I don't think she will have an interest in this stuff.

So why do I had it all? Because I know what it meant to my mother. Oddly enough, there's nothing I can think of that belongs to me that means as much as these items meant to her. I guess I probably should put them on consignment somewhere, but I doubt there's a market. So what to do?
Reminds me of all the other "collectibles" that I and many of my contemporaries have also squirreled away… the cabinets & shelves full of "Elvis" memorabilia, salt-n-pepper shakers, tourist snow globes, vintage toys, license plates, comic books, whatever. Just like folks have been doing for generations before us.

So maybe what we're seeing is the first generation where everything is now considered "disposable", simply because so much "stuff" has finally become so ubiquitous, cheap and easily available (and if it isn't, soon we'll just 3D print it)!
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Old 04-04-2015, 10:02 AM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,320 posts, read 15,371,647 times
Reputation: 9506
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmartMoney View Post
For two decades I have been saddled with an antique chia cabinet with curved glass. Anyone going near the beast must be careful ("don't play with the dog in there!"). In that cabinet is the mother of all Hummel collections with Bee marks dating back to WWII. I've got the entire orchestra. In another cabinet (closed door) is my grandmother's china.

I have two boys (Gen y'ers or millenials?) that have no interest in this stuff.....oh, I forgot to mention all the boxes of cotume and rhinestone jewelry....anyway, these boys ha no interest. My first grandchild, a girl, will be here in July. I don't think she will have an interest in this stuff.

So why do I had it all? Because I know what it meant to my mother. Oddly enough, there's nothing I can think of that belongs to me that means as much as these items meant to her. I guess I probably should put them on consignment somewhere, but I doubt there's a market. So what to do?
After 3 moves, I finally sold the heavy or large pieces and the china collections (my mother liked chintz, not collectable figurines) because they had become both a burden and mismatched standouts in my house, because my own taste runs to cleaner, simpler pieces (semi-shaker lighter cherry). Every move I struggled with damage to the increasingly fragile pieces, many of which were from the 18th and 19th century.

Finally I cut the collection back to my 3 favorite clocks, a single chintz tea pot and 4 cups and a marquetry music cabinet from around 1800.

The jewelry I finally went through, offered things to my son, who gave his girlfriend a necklace or two and then I sold what was valuable and gave what I could to a preschool for dress-up (no brooches or pins or things that might come unstrung).

For the larger pieces, you want to take a lot of pictures and go around and talk to antiques dealers. For a couple pieces, I actually took pictures to an Antiques Roadshow event to get an idea when the pieces were made, what the exact style was (one of the pieces I thought was Federal was better described as American Empire, for instance). For some of the pieces they were able to give me a rough value and then a likely "wholesale" value).

Once I had a list of what I had and pictures, I actually was able to get several dealers to come to the house and look at what I had. I got about 20% less than the "wholesale" price I was given, but then they came to my house and packed it all up, too.

For the semi-collectable stuff, like the Hummels, you are going to want to do a similar thing - take pictures, drive around and talk to collectables stores. You may not get much for them, but the money isn't really the point.
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Old 04-04-2015, 11:46 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,893 posts, read 18,900,996 times
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For Hummels, you can put them on ebay. You can look up the names of each piece if you don't know. Do some ebay research in Completeds to see what they sell for (not that much anymore, sadly. It's the marking on the base that you need to know as well as the name of the figure) and price yours accordingly. Do a fixed price rather than an auction. Pack well with bubble wrap.

For furniture I called an auction house and they came and took it, bit by bit. They couldn't take it all at once because I couldn't get everything ready and out into the living room at once. I didn't get a lot of money but I felt that it went to people who wanted it enough to bid on it and it helped a lot that the auction house people came with a truck and just moved it OUT.
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Old 04-04-2015, 12:34 PM
 
1,835 posts, read 2,601,862 times
Reputation: 1793
Thanks for the link. This is also something we need to get rid of eventually too.
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Old 04-04-2015, 01:09 PM
 
10,532 posts, read 8,452,687 times
Reputation: 19278
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmartMoney View Post
For two decades I have been saddled with an antique chia cabinet with curved glass. Anyone going near the beast must be careful ("don't play with the dog in there!"). In that cabinet is the mother of all Hummel collections with Bee marks dating back to WWII. I've got the entire orchestra. In another cabinet (closed door) is my grandmother's china.

I have two boys (Gen y'ers or millenials?) that have no interest in this stuff.....oh, I forgot to mention all the boxes of cotume and rhinestone jewelry....anyway, these boys ha no interest. My first grandchild, a girl, will be here in July. I don't think she will have an interest in this stuff.

So why do I had it all? Because I know what it meant to my mother. Oddly enough, there's nothing I can think of that belongs to me that means as much as these items meant to her. I guess I probably should put them on consignment somewhere, but I doubt there's a market. So what to do?
Certain brands of rhinestone costume jewelry are doing very well on today's market, so look carefully for makers' marks before you pitch or give away any of the jewelry. Your local library or bookstore may have books on collectible costume jewelry that would be helpful in identifying what you have.
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