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Old 03-28-2015, 12:23 PM
 
7,928 posts, read 5,042,332 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
Years ago I was asking the grandkids if they'd like to have any of the American classic cars that were on display at the local car show in town, they didn't "get" the whole idea of old cars being worth anything, and that led me to wonder if those cars would ever be looked at in the same way we did, a hook to our past, but certainly not theirs.
I've noticed the opposite. Cars from 1955-1972 remain as prized and almost hallowed classics, even amongst persons whose parents were toddlers when those cars were originally built. Why? Not for any fondness for a bygone age, or association with personal memories. It's because those cars are mechanical, simple, accessible. Their "technology" is readily palpable. It's not millions of transistors on a silicon wafer, invisible even under a microscope. Oh, and they're rear wheel drive!

It's also worth distinguishing between quotidian and contrived "collectibles", of the type bought from a catalog in the 1970s, from hand-crafted articles of genuine historical value. One supposes that even a jaded Millennial would appreciate a hand-carved ebony and ivory chess-set from the 18th century, but not say an injection-molded plastic one from the mid-20th century. So many of the things "collected" by the American middle-class in the 20th century are just well-marketed mass-produced trinkets.

Having recently gone through the estate of a relative who passed away, I was surprised by the mishmash of impressive and memorable photos, with piles of AAA maps from the 1980s. There was rare and valuable silver, together with made-in-Taiwan (remember when Taiwan made the cheap stuff, and China still didn't make anything?) dinnerware and knickknacks. It took time to rifle through all of that stuff... a good bit was of archival value, but the dumpster was also full. Perhaps what ails Millennials isn't so much disregard for physical evidence of the past, as lack of time (real or perceived) to separate wheat from chaff?
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Old 03-28-2015, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,492,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
I've noticed the opposite. Cars from 1955-1972 remain as prized and almost hallowed classics, even amongst persons whose parents were toddlers when those cars were originally built. Why? Not for any fondness for a bygone age, or association with personal memories. It's because those cars are mechanical, simple, accessible. Their "technology" is readily palpable. It's not millions of transistors on a silicon wafer, invisible even under a microscope. Oh, and they're rear wheel drive!

It's also worth distinguishing between quotidian and contrived "collectibles", of the type bought from a catalog in the 1970s, from hand-crafted articles of genuine historical value. One supposes that even a jaded Millennial would appreciate a hand-carved ebony and ivory chess-set from the 18th century, but not say an injection-molded plastic one from the mid-20th century. So many of the things "collected" by the American middle-class in the 20th century are just well-marketed mass-produced trinkets.

Having recently gone through the estate of a relative who passed away, I was surprised by the mishmash of impressive and memorable photos, with piles of AAA maps from the 1980s. There was rare and valuable silver, together with made-in-Taiwan (remember when Taiwan made the cheap stuff, and China still didn't make anything?) dinnerware and knickknacks. It took time to rifle through all of that stuff... a good bit was of archival value, but the dumpster was also full. Perhaps what ails Millennials isn't so much disregard for physical evidence of the past, as lack of time (real or perceived) to separate wheat from chaff?
Millennial chiming in, your post is closest to the truth. Perhaps all of this is perceived as insulting to the older generations, but it really shouldn't be. The fact is that people living in their own home generally will have things occupying that space, and not everyone has the space to take on a large item like a leather sofa without simply throwing away their own beloved sofa, one they perhaps chose with care that matches the rest of the space and style. A piece of furniture they perhaps have an attachment of their own to. I don't think it's that Millennials don't care about the past or don't want anything that belonged to their parents, it's just that we don't want to live cluttered lives with homes full of junk we don't really need. That doesn't mean things that truly matter or are truly valuable aren't wanted, but maybe 4 or 5 things is all I can accept. I am young and do not have a large home, and this is true of most people in my stage of life. I must recognize that I don't need, or have space for, everything, so I am obligated to be picky. That doesn't mean I don't love and care about my family, far from it, I'm simply being responsible about what I can realistically take. I am very grateful when something is offered, it saddens me when I cannot accept in the spirit in which something is given, but sometimes I can and I am very happy to fave a family heirloom to decorate a wall or use in the kitchen.
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Old 03-28-2015, 12:59 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,896 posts, read 42,133,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Millennial chiming in, your post is closest to the truth. Perhaps all of this is perceived as insulting to the older generations, but it really shouldn't be. The fact is that people living in their own home generally will have things occupying that space, and not everyone has the space to take on a large item like a leather sofa without simply throwing away their own beloved sofa, one they perhaps chose with care that matches the rest of the space and style. A piece of furniture they perhaps have an attachment of their own to. I don't think it's that Millennials don't care about the past or don't want anything that belonged to their parents, it's just that we don't want to live cluttered lives with homes full of junk we don't really need. That doesn't mean things that truly matter or are truly valuable aren't wanted, but maybe 4 or 5 things is all I can accept. I am young and do not have a large home, and this is true of most people in my stage of life. I must recognize that I don't need, or have space for, everything, so I am obligated to be picky. That doesn't mean I don't love and care about my family, far from it, I'm simply being responsible about what I can realistically take. I am very grateful when something is offered, it saddens me when I cannot accept in the spirit in which something is given, but sometimes I can and I am very happy to fave a family heirloom to decorate a wall or use in the kitchen.

It depends, the couch example, yes.

I watched my WW II generation relatives break the handles off 100 year old Belgian china coffee cups and break the plates when my grandmother died. They didn't want anyone to have the set, which was a full service for 16, which had been brought over when she immigrated to the US. The same with a Prussian Army officer's sword, broken in half in a shop vise. Antique tools from that shop were thrown into a 55 gallon drum piled with wood, doused with gasoline and set on fire. Hand blown German Christmas ornaments used as target practice with .22s.

I tried to tell them that some of the individual items were worth hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars. All to the landfill and the bony pile at a local coal mine.
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:01 PM
 
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I don't like owning a lot of stuff because it sucks moving it.
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
It depends, the couch example, yes.

I watched my WW II generation relatives break the handles off 100 year old Belgian china coffee cups and break the plates when my grandmother died. They didn't want anyone to have the set, which was a full service for 16, which had been brought over when she immigrated to the US. The same with a Prussian Army officer's sword, broken in half in a shop vise. Antique tools from that shop were thrown into a 55 gallon drum piled with wood, doused with gasoline and set on fire. Hand blown German Christmas ornaments used as target practice with .22s.

I tried to tell them that some of the individual items were worth hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars. All to the landfill and the bony pile at a local coal mine.
That's horrific. I guess I'd take more on then I otherwise would if I knew that would be the result. I guess I can't really understand the aversion to selling old items to the point of destroying them so no one else could possibly enjoy them. It just sounds like an extremely selfish act.
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:05 PM
 
Location: in here, out there
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Do you really want your children to grow up to be hoarders like you?
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:06 PM
 
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It's because most have been raised in the era of plenty compared to my oldest of friends.

Many were children of the Depression and passed this on to their Boomers... my Grandparents were dairy farmers and all of their mementoes fit in a suitcase including some family heirlooms like deeds, marriage certificates and old photos.

Kids today are very different... last weeks smart phone is already dated as is much of technology... besides many don't stay in one place like past generations.

I've got 50 vehicles and there is little to no interest from the next generation and the parents are driving that... my God Daughter has asked for my 1961 all original Corvette and her parents have told her it's fine to look at... too dangerous to drive... same for my Mustang Convertibles, Model T and A's etc.

Still have my Apple //e computer that cost several months wages with all the packing material and original box...

Keep some things long enough and they become collectable...

A friend had no idea to do with a wall of family photos when her mom died... I suggested a couple of her Mom's suitcases could be used for the interim... he daughter is really into history and is so very glad these items were preserved 18 years ago...

Think about it... a couple of old suitcases is enough to hold most family treasures and easy to store... I did the same for my Great Grandmother's China... part of the key to sorting is to be forward thinking.

I would like to add something from the other prospective.

My Great Aunt had been a widow three times... no children or step children... first husband died in WWI, second in WWII and the third back in 1960...

She was a very sweet person and kept her modest home immaculate... when it was time to move to a retirement home she was really sad not knowing what to do with her belongings...

I had an empty one car garage and offered to store anything she wanted... it was a huge weight lifted and she readily agreed to move... over the years she only asked for two small items... now the interesting part is I would tell her of a young family starting out that could use a kitchen table or a book case and similar... she was thrilled to give them to someone that could use and appreciate...

It did her heart good to know even at 94 she was helping people and I was glad to put her mind at ease...

Have a little empathy and realize that small gestures can mean a lot...

Last edited by Ultrarunner; 03-28-2015 at 01:17 PM..
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:13 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,304,137 times
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OMG NorthBeachPerson, how awful.

Not having any heirs sans two stepkids and some friends, I always thought of my collections as my retirement plan, valuables that I would sell if I needed cash.

I guess after we move I should do an inventory and valuation to leave behind. The kids and friends know our stuff has value.
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:23 PM
 
26,591 posts, read 52,303,280 times
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Going a step further...

I have income property that I wanted to set up in trust for my nephews and nieces... it was a no starter for various reasons...

Why subject the kids to the headaches of income property, why tie them down, why put them in less desirable parts of town... giving them property will deprive them the joy of making their own way... etc.?

When my Grandmother passed and my Uncle was liquidating... I made an offer to the Estate to buy her home at full value... others thought it strange I would want the old place and I said in part because of all the good memories... funny thing happened when Real Estate Values started to go up I was the one who "Got" Grandma's house... no one seems to remember I paid 360k for it.
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Old 03-28-2015, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,562 posts, read 1,352,029 times
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When my parents moved out of their home and into an apartment, they offered me pretty much anything we wanted, I took very little. Some tools, perhaps one or two small pieces of furniture (lamp, mirror, lazyboy recliner etc...) When my mother-in law passed away, my wife also took very little out of her home for us to keep. Again, one or two small pieces of furniture, maybe a couple things from the garage and that was about it.

Fact is, we've been prosperous in life, we have what we need already for the most part and don't want to clutter our home up with "nostalgic" furniture and other things we don't really need and don't fit out lifestyle. I can only imagine our kids will be the same way when our time comes to downsize.

I have all my parents photo albums in our basement in two large rubbermaid plastic totes. I have no idea what to do with them. I'm not a large picture taker myself. I take a few digitals here and there to remember special events by, but have no intention of printing 99% of them or ever putting them in albums.

Just the other night I was actually looking at some of my parents old picture albums....and it was fun, yes, but all I could think of was that It had been quite a number of years since I'd looked at them and I have no idea if I should carry these two totes around as we move, or if my kids will ever even want any of these pictures. I've thought of digitizing them all....but oh my god, that would be a job that would take a hundred hours to scan every one of them.....anybody have any ideas here ? I'm all ears !

My siblings have never even mentioned these albums and I've had them for over 12 years now....in the basement, sitting in plastic totes.

When Mom moved the last time out of her apartment and into assisted living 12 years ago, my siblings mentioned wanting to come to town (they live a long distance away) and go through the things and take some stuff. So I put all of it into storage and paid 80 bucks a month for almost two years. I reminded them several times, but they never actually came to look, so we had a garage sale and sold everything in there for something in the neighborhood of 500 bucks total. So I paid almost $2000.00 to store stuff that was worth $500.00 at garage sale prices. That was when the light finally came on for me. Living leaner is a better way to go !

Perhaps our kids have learned a lesson that our generaltion didn't.....you don't need all kinds of crap surrounding you to live a good life. I've heard said, "less is more". Plus....it's sure easlier to move if your home isn't bursting at the seams with "stuff".

Last edited by jasper1372; 03-28-2015 at 02:25 PM..
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