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Old 03-29-2015, 05:26 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,337 posts, read 10,327,920 times
Reputation: 28455

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I admire their priorities.


Memories over stuff.
I'm getting there.
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:16 AM
 
Location: NC
6,548 posts, read 7,961,421 times
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The space comment (not having enough) is quite appropriate. Young people have small apartments and condos and want to be able to move around for better salaries. They want to decorate in a trendy style which today means repurposing a few odd pieces that do not show a traditional vibe. They have been raised with access to cheap, disposable stuff. The idea of antiques, and the stories that they tell, is burdensome. While their parents saw antiques as 'grounding', younger folks will have none of it. There will always be something new and cheap they can latch on to.

The terms antiques and collectibles are totally subjective as well. As an older person, I only call valuable those premade items that are true, one-off, works of art. Most 'collectibles' certainly do not fall into that category. Yes, I have a lot of 'brown' furniture and old pottery/porcelain, but that is primarily because of my appreciation of nature (wood grain and color) and the color and shapes of what I use as decor.
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Florida
2,291 posts, read 4,943,964 times
Reputation: 5236
I am a boomer, I, being the only girl niece from my fathers side of the family, have been the lucky recipient of their treasured dishes, I now have 4 sets of china, also will be inheriting another set from my cousin and one from my mother, so that will make 6 sets, 5 sets are Norataki,
one is hand painted, by someone signed as S. Knight, the set is at least 70 years old.

To top all of this off, I have a set of my own, no longer have a formal dining room, and....no children, nor does my brother!

They are all stored in my shed, I must be nuts, I need to figure out what to do with all these dishes...so, yes, I do get why millennials don't want our "stuff", I don't even want my "stuff".
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Subconscious Syncope, USA (Northeastern US)
2,367 posts, read 1,634,678 times
Reputation: 3814
Depression era people had a hard time, so, they are great at saving everything. I remember my grandmother washing and reusing aluminum foil because it was 'expensive and still good', and other such practices that are long forgotten in society.

My mother-in-law, who also grew up in the Depression, cant even bring herself to throw out old food. She will wait till something is over-ripe, doesnt remember how long its been in the freezer, or almost stale, and seeing she herself isnt going to use it, will offer it to me. I must take it, and then I throw it away for her.

Her rationale is that, "its a sin to throw away food." I say nothing, but cant help but think, "so, you would like me to sin for you??" I have never been able to be a stay at home wife, always needed to work, and although I love cooking, just dont have the time to plan 'recycled food' dinners and desserts. The only recycling in that order I now do is turning last nights fresh mashed potatoes into potato cakes the next day. I guess I at least picked up one of my grandmothers habits, lol.

I thank God for my mother-in-laws saving ways though. Her son and I will have a decent old age retirement because of her ability to save money in an income bracket where others today would say they had none that could be saved. She has spent her life (from childhood to elderly) in the same neighborhood. Her now-deceased husband did the same. The few vacations they actually spent any kind of money on were in the same state they lived in, and that they drove to back when gas was still considered 'cheap'.

Her son and I are both Boomers. Im on the tail end of the Boom, lol. I can look back now and see how we were a lot more wasteful than they were. We have things from a past business venture, that although I dont use, I still keep. I even have a few old address books that although none of the addresses or phone numbers are still good. I can't bring myself to throw them out yet. Looking at them infrequently the best I can say is - they represent our past lives.

I need to start throwing things out myself (we have no children to take our memories, and they are not things that hold any value to anyone but ourselves for the most part), in preparation for a much smaller lifestyle - and, one I look forward to.

Today, we have a lot in common with the non-jet-setting Millinials. For whatever reason, young and old alike are looking to downsize. Just look at the 'boom' in transcient and Tiny House living. The reasons for this may differ by generation or individual, but both the Boomers and the Millinials, for the most part, seem to be moving in the same direction.

Part of me would like to retire to a small farmhouse, so I can live out a childhood dream of being a stay at home wife - growing, canning and cooking my own fresh foods. Another part of me realizes that the older my husband and I get, the less realistic maintaining a small farm gets.

I see examples of people retiring to McMansions, to realize a dream they could not obtain while young and working. One woman wanting a 4 bedroom home incase the kids want to visit and such. To me, that is someone who wants to spend their retirement cleaning and dusting.

I think if the economy ever recovers, Millinials will want the big house with lots of stuff too - but right now, that is hardly practical, especially for someone who is just starting out in life. They marry and start families much later in life than the Boomers and those before them did for the most part - IF they ever do at all.
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:24 AM
 
687 posts, read 693,938 times
Reputation: 2243
Quote:
Originally Posted by mateo45 View Post
Heck, most of 'em refuse to even repair anything anymore!
How exactly does one go about repairing cheap Chinese and Malaysian made trinkets?

Thanks Boomers for shipping all of our factories overseas. Don't blame us for being "lazy" it's you guys who wanted that cheap labor and allowed it to happen politically right before your eyes, under your watch, under your stewardship of this nation.

Why spend a couple hours repairing something when that item could be bought for less in wage time? It's a cost-benefit analysis for everything.

I'm only 28 and already trying to de-clutter and downsize my life. What does that tell me about you guys? So I often have no need of repairing "some...thing" when the best course of action may be to not replace it at all. I seldom buy "home goods" at all. I have plenty enough already (sorry Kohls, Sears, etc.).

[Side note: there is going to be steady downward pressure on prices for everything going forward because our society has hit "peak junk" and there's more junk existing than people who could possibly use or even want it all; no need to blame it on e-bay, it's existence merely a manifestation rather than the cause of this trend.]

And as for furniture I buy off of Craigslist so that whatever I truly cannot haul away or what I simply don't feel like taking along either gets resold on craigslist or, failing that donated. I don't even take the tax receipt because I'll never have enough to itemize (which I understand is the only reason boomers donate anyway: for the tax write off).

I work in the trades, so I go around repairing a lot of things and am certainly not lazy. I fix everything to the wiring in your walls to old Lamps (which is actually kind of a neat thing to repair) and light fixtures...and not just the electrical side, but often the purely physical parts as well. There's a lot more to electrical work than just twisting on wire nuts. We require nearly every tool a carpenter has in addition to our own.

-mapmd.

Last edited by mapmd; 03-29-2015 at 07:45 AM.. Reason: Formatting, Grammar.
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,337 posts, read 10,327,920 times
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if the original hand made item was fixed, there wouldn't be a need to buy foreign made junk.


Some times, it's not about cost. It's about using your hands, and creating. It's about respecting and acknowledging the time, effort, and material used by the person who made the item to begin with. Not talking factory made stuff.
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:48 AM
 
4,728 posts, read 4,471,617 times
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My mother has pieces that her mother had that were passed down since before the Civil War. These pieces are large, but beautiful. I will keep what I can. I hope to be able to keep my parent's home. If I can, I will keep the furniture too. It is furniture that is appraised high, but you can't get the value of it in today's market. People just don't want it, but I do because it has been in my family forever.
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Old 03-29-2015, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,469,891 times
Reputation: 27565
Quote:
Originally Posted by mapmd View Post
How exactly does one go about repairing cheap Chinese and Malaysian made trinkets?

Thanks Boomers for shipping all of our factories overseas. Don't blame us for being "lazy" it's you guys who wanted that cheap labor and allowed it to happen politically right before your eyes, under your watch, under your stewardship of this nation.

Why spend a couple hours repairing something when that item could be bought for less in wage time? It's a cost-benefit analysis for everything.

I'm only 28 and already trying to de-clutter and downsize my life. What does that tell me about you guys? So I often have no need of repairing "some...thing" when the best course of action may be to not replace it at all. I seldom buy "home goods" at all. I have plenty enough already (sorry Kohls, Sears, etc.).

[Side note: there is going to be steady downward pressure on prices for everything going forward because our society has hit "peak junk" and there's more junk existing than people who could possibly use or even want it all; no need to blame it on e-bay, it's existence merely a manifestation rather than the cause of this trend.]

And as for furniture I buy off of Craigslist so that whatever I truly cannot haul away or what I simply don't feel like taking along either gets resold on craigslist or, failing that donated. I don't even take the tax receipt because I'll never have enough to itemize (which I understand is the only reason boomers donate anyway: for the tax write off).

I work in the trades, so I go around repairing a lot of things and am certainly not lazy. I fix everything to the wiring in your walls to old Lamps (which is actually kind of a neat thing to repair) and light fixtures...and not just the electrical side, but often the purely physical parts as well. There's a lot more to electrical work than just twisting on wire nuts. We require nearly every tool a carpenter has in addition to our own.

-mapmd.
Factory jobs started to get offshored in the 60's to Japan.
Boomers were kids then so you can't blame them.
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Old 03-29-2015, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
226 posts, read 284,443 times
Reputation: 203
As a late-twenties Millennial, I always take the photos and old documents. Always. My husband is less sentimental. I save cards and all of that in a big box, and have birthday cards from when I was little. These things don't take up much space, and are carefully stored in our apartment.
But Furniture? Old plates? Nope. Not unless they are extremely old/family heirlooms. I grew up in a house full of clutter and collections, always going every weekend to the 'junk stores' (thrift shops) and antique stores looking for new things (more clutter).
My parents and grandparents were not hoarders, but had lots of little things everywhere. Every shelf was full of nick-knacks. I don't want to dust all of that stuff, I don't want to have to worry about packing it to move again - because we move where the work is and that can be often- and I don't want my home to be cluttered. Less stuff to me is just more relaxing.
Just like the article, I want to pay for experiences. Memories. Not stuff. I would rather take my grandparents or parents on a trip than take my grandparents' (Baby Boomers) set of 10 Asian women fishing nick-knacks. Or my mom's (Gen Xer) set of china when I don't even formally entertain.

Last edited by kwarfield; 03-29-2015 at 08:08 AM.. Reason: grammar
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Old 03-29-2015, 08:21 AM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,453 posts, read 3,751,922 times
Reputation: 9592
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
Factory jobs started to get offshored in the 60's to Japan.
Boomers were kids then so you can't blame them.
Sure they can and some of them will and some of them won't.

"To make matters worse, young adults don’t seem to want their own college textbooks, sports trophies or T-shirt collections, still entombed in plastic containers at their parents’ homes."

I am a 'boomer' merely by the time frame I was born in. I have never been a collector of anything, or a hoarder. Not necessarily because I am above it but simply because I have always lived efficiently and in smaller apartments or homes.

I will say this though, I'm still in possession of some of my children's things because they have not found the time (nor have the space themselves) to retrieve their belongings.

Oh well, those things will be the things they will have to come to terms with when I leave this earthly plane, and they will probably dump them (as I have wanted to do all these many years).
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