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Old 03-29-2015, 01:21 PM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
8,367 posts, read 8,586,137 times
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Of course a lot of this also has to do with "economics" and the particular 'demographic'. Naturally yuppie kids are always gonna expect "new" and the "latest & greatest". But I can also point 'ya to plenty of other, more "modest" communities, where "recycling" via thrift stores, flea markets, and 'estate sales' is pretty much the norm!
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Old 03-29-2015, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC
226 posts, read 284,520 times
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Fox Terrier - one thing I did forget to add! BOOKS! I have some beautiful built-in bookcases in my apartment (bottom floor of an older home). I have tons of my own - reading was a priority in my family. I miss living so close to family because my grandmother and I used to trade books like crazy. My mom and I used to when she lived nearby as well, but they go where the work is now as well (plus they're mostly in storage)! It scares me to think that books are becoming obsolete. I do love my Nook, but there is nothing like going into a used book store or library...that smell!

I think that these things go in cycles. I fully believe that as we age, we will become more sentimental (plus we will have more than tiny apartments probably) and will start taking some of these pieces of family furniture and that sort of thing. Maybe we'll have less 'stuff'. I don't know. I can't predict where or who or how I will be in 30 years...or even if I'll be around!
Every generation complains about each other, but in the end...most of us don't wield the power (only that top few %, which there are some Millennials, some Boomers, some Xers, etc), and all of us put our pants on one leg at a time.
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Old 03-29-2015, 01:32 PM
 
Location: UpstateNY
8,612 posts, read 8,297,923 times
Reputation: 7522
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
Maybe it's a case of not being educated?

A dear friend was expecting her first child and her husband's great Grandmother back on the family farm in Illinois wanted to send out a baby crib that had been in the family since the 1700's... my friend was horrified... she had already bought a crib from Costco made in China... (which later was recalled by the product safety commission)

When great Grandma died they and an antique estate appraiser sale and the crib sold for $3400...

She told me she only the heard the words antique and hand me down without looking into it any more.
Or not caring enough to find out........

Quote:
Originally Posted by 495neighbor View Post
The root of this is activity. The furniture of 30 and 40 years ago doesn't fit what we do today. If someone reads by Kindle, they won't value a bookcase. That once prized secretary desk won't work with an oversized monitor and today's computers and electronics. Televisions, once housed in huge pieces of furniture, are now displayed on walls.

I am curious how long the current clean-lined aesthetic will remain popular or if we will ever return to more ornamented style, at some point.
My mother's childhood secretary desk hold my business flat screen monitor and wireless keyboard perfectly. The cubbies in the top are perfect for shipping labels, envelopes, etc. Along side it is the solid oak vintage library file cabinet. It's a two drawer on a wheeled stand.

And I liked this stuff when I was 19 and furnishing our first apartment. I like old stuff. Hopefully I will reincarnate into some young person.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultrarunner View Post
The current clean line has actually been around for a long time in Europe...

Back when I was working there my friends would have almost extreme minimalist apartments and homes...

Funny thing is Flea Markets were just starting and old things like a coffee grinder, treadle sewing machine and old copper pots and pans were highly sought after if not to use... as decorator pieces or a place for flowers... old armoires from 200, 300 or older were highly prized too.

I will admit to being stuck in the past... my first car was a 1929 Model A and never lived in a home with Cable and don't own a Cell or have a flat screen... even have a rotary dial phone in the garage.
I'm with ya; thos rotary phones sell well on ebay! And '70's avocado and mustard, even better!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mateo45 View Post
Of course a lot of this also has to do with "economics" and the particular 'demographic'. Naturally yuppie kids are always gonna expect "new" and the "latest & greatest". But I can also point 'ya to plenty of other, more "modest" communities, where "recycling" via thrift stores, flea markets, and 'estate sales' is pretty much the norm!


Quote:
Originally Posted by kwarfield View Post
Fox Terrier - one thing I did forget to add! BOOKS! I have some beautiful built-in bookcases in my apartment (bottom floor of an older home). I have tons of my own - reading was a priority in my family. I miss living so close to family because my grandmother and I used to trade books like crazy. My mom and I used to when she lived nearby as well, but they go where the work is now as well (plus they're mostly in storage)! It scares me to think that books are becoming obsolete. I do love my Nook, but there is nothing like going into a used book store or library...that smell!

I think that these things go in cycles. I fully believe that as we age, we will become more sentimental (plus we will have more than tiny apartments probably) and will start taking some of these pieces of family furniture and that sort of thing. Maybe we'll have less 'stuff'. I don't know. I can't predict where or who or how I will be in 30 years...or even if I'll be around!
Every generation complains about each other, but in the end...most of us don't wield the power (only that top few %, which there are some Millennials, some Boomers, some Xers, etc), and all of us put our pants on one leg at a time.
It's subject to the individual. And background, upbringing, etc. So many variables.
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Old 03-29-2015, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 13,945,676 times
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Put it on Craigslist. I want it.
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Old 03-29-2015, 01:45 PM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,267,707 times
Reputation: 20410
Cycles... trends... what's old is new... all very normal.

It wasn't all that long ago that every stitch of hardwood had to be covered over with wall to wall carpet.

Not that long ago and dark kitchen cabinets were trashed or painted white... now at least in my area cherry cabinets are very much in again...

Bought my second home from the original owner that bought it new in 1922... they never had children and her husband was quite a bit older... anyway... that home was like going back in time... all the fixtures, stove, everything was from 1922.

My friends couldn't wait for the demolition party to rip out the blue and yellow kitchen tiles, trash the high leg stove and plumbing fixtures... etc.

I chose a different path... I went room by room cleaning and restoring... even took apart and polished all the door lock hardware, refinished the matchstick hardwood floors and built in cabinets and kept the push button light switches.

Spent very little money... mostly time.

When I was done the home really looked like a brand new 1922 Craftsman Bungalow right down to the double hung windows.

Here's the kicker... when it came time to sell... I also got the highest price at that time and much higher than similar homes that had been "Updated"

It taught me that chasing the trends is folly because today's trend is already on the way out.

It also taught me to appreciate simplicity and good design and just how much can be done on a shoestring budget...

If a person can afford to buy a home and rip everything down to the studs and it makes them happy then who am I to say no... just don't kid yourself that everything new is an improvement...
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Old 03-29-2015, 01:46 PM
 
2,429 posts, read 3,222,625 times
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I getting LESS sentimental about material possessions. Only thing I'm into keeping -- for now -- is photos.

I've played the mind game of what would I grab in a fire?
My computer, home mortgage paperwork, and some bills (which are all together in a "grab and go bag")...and as many photos as I could...which are also mostly in one place.
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Old 03-29-2015, 01:53 PM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,267,707 times
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In the Oakland Fire Storm several of my friends escaped with the clothes on their back... nothing more.

All had good insurance and because of the nature of the devastation... they all eventually were satisfied with the settlements.

Even today, almost 25 year later, most will tear up thinking about what was lost and only one said it was a new beginning or a cleansing...

The reality is many of us do form strong ties to material things and we just need to realize others may not feel the same.

One of my oldest friends told me... it's a good feeling to have what you need and need what you have.
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Old 03-29-2015, 02:05 PM
 
9,678 posts, read 15,855,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Did we want our parents stuff when we were in our 20's. Be glad they consider it junk as for most of us it will only take on value when we are gone. Even pictures of our parents became precious when they were gone. So I am more than willing to defer them wanting memories and artifacts from our lives. Now what I did want was my baseball cards and comic books that my mother threw away. Yes Mantle, Aaron, Mays etc etc etc. She kept her junk for ever and threw away mucho bucks worth of real memorabilia.

Realize, such only becomes valuable after a generation or two passes. My grandmother kept her sewing stuff in largeNew Era potato chip cans, they were metal, with lids, fairly large---not like a Pringles can---GM covered them with leftover fabric and they made nice displays as well. Ok, but, they were just old cans, Grandpa tossed them when she passed. Many years later, I saw the exact same cans in an antique shop, going for $50!

We can't know what will be tomorrow's treasures, we simply have to do what's best for us today!
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Old 03-29-2015, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,371 posts, read 9,859,230 times
Reputation: 10243
The millennials don't want our "stuff"?

Heck that makes sense..I don't want our "stuff" either.

Trying to pare down the extraneous.

But somehow books and thrift store clothing finds keep creeping back into the house. It's a mystery.

I think this happens while we sleep....
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Old 03-29-2015, 02:23 PM
 
9,678 posts, read 15,855,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john620 View Post
It's not just that they don't want it but that stuff isn't worth much anymore, if it even was at one point. I would blame ebay for this most of all of this. Because of ebay there is so much supply that made it onto the marketplace, prices were driven down. Over the last 50 years people realized to keep some items because they would become collectable. Problem is if every one does it they are not collectable.

Nowadays after the crisis, there is less focus on traditional house Goodall more focus on lifestyle and experiences whether it's startbucks or skydiving. Sure jewelry and coach or lv bags will sell but things like Lennox bone china or Hummel figurines don't attract that much interest. Even coins, unless they are in great shape and certified aren't worth that much more than their metal content.

Yep, I've noticed that!

We are moving, and also downsizing pre-retirement. I have a Lenox clock that I use, its a mantel clock, and looks great where it is! However, I have at least 10 more lenox items I never use, they are in their boxes in the closet. I figured to make a little money and get rid of them....a little money is about all they would fetch! Seems that stuff has just lost its appeal.

Back in the 80's, certain pottery and glassware was very popular. I have an old cookie jar, belonged to my Grandmother, the exact same jar at one time went for $800+. Now, it doesn't even attract bids! However, I'm glad I kept it for the sentiment, but....if I had sold it, invested the $800 in mutual funds.....well, ok, just in time for the big stock market crash! Live for today! I'm still glad I have a touchpoint from my childhood ad my grandparents, you can't buy that on Ebay!
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