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Old 03-28-2015, 07:56 AM
 
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Today's Washington Post article about how the baby boomer collectors are discovering the millennials don't want our stuff. This has been discussed here so much we could have written this.

Stuff it: Millennials nix their parents

I have one DS who fits this to the T but I discovered my other one does have some sentimental bones as he took more stuff than I expected. Of course he's also a starving student living in a high cost area so more likely it was practical needs won out over sentimental desires.
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Old 03-28-2015, 09:44 AM
 
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Can't say I blame them. Even I've stopped printing out photos. "Live for today" ~ my new motto.
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Old 03-28-2015, 09:49 AM
 
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Did we want our parents stuff when we were in our 20's. Be glad they consider it junk as for most of us it will only take on value when we are gone. Even pictures of our parents became precious when they were gone. So I am more than willing to defer them wanting memories and artifacts from our lives. Now what I did want was my baseball cards and comic books that my mother threw away. Yes Mantle, Aaron, Mays etc etc etc. She kept her junk for ever and threw away mucho bucks worth of real memorabilia.
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Old 03-28-2015, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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When my mother died 10 years ago my sister and I faced the problem of getting rid of her furniture, as well as her keepsakes. I was able to take some of the furniture because I had use for it where I live. But also I have a sentimental attachment to those items because they were hers over a long period of years, and this despite the fact that I didn't get along particularly well with my mother! Go figure.
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Old 03-28-2015, 10:43 AM
 
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I can see some humor in the current realization by boomers that the kids won't cherish our "stuff" at our passing. Years ago I was asking the grandkids if they'd like to have any of the American classic cars that were on display at the local car show in town, they didn't "get" the whole idea of old cars being worth anything, and that led me to wonder if those cars would ever be looked at in the same way we did, a hook to our past, but certainly not theirs. Their idea of a cool car is the four cylinder hotrod of a slammed down Honda sounding like an amped up sewing machine.

On a recent trip to California we noted the many near empty antique shops in small towns that once catered to the nostalgic boomers, we also couldn't help but note the age of those who were driving the fifties classics around town, definitely the gray haired set looking every bit the proud teen type on cruise night. In another ten years the nostalgia craze may well include the collection of music from the eighties and Hondas from the nineties. A visit to the local thrift store will definitely be an eye opener to those who think that time automatically bestows value on things, instead we see the same kind of sad sense of value displayed at the average estate sale.
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Old 03-28-2015, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Montana
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House? Maybe.
Newer car? Probably.
A specific heirloom or art peice? Probably.

Anything else, cash is king baby! Just like us, actually...
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Old 03-28-2015, 10:56 AM
 
29,774 posts, read 34,856,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by choff5 View Post
Today's Washington Post article about how the baby boomer collectors are discovering the millennials don't want our stuff. This has been discussed here so much we could have written this.

Stuff it: Millennials nix their parents

I have one DS who fits this to the T but I discovered my other one does have some sentimental bones as he took more stuff than I expected. Of course he's also a starving student living in a high cost area so more likely it was practical needs won out over sentimental desires.
The operative word is OUR, how much do we want somebody else's the same age old stuff?
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Old 03-28-2015, 11:01 AM
 
6,306 posts, read 5,049,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by choff5 View Post
Today's Washington Post article about how the baby boomer collectors are discovering the millennials don't want our stuff. This has been discussed here so much we could have written this.

Stuff it: Millennials nix their parents

I have one DS who fits this to the T but I discovered my other one does have some sentimental bones as he took more stuff than I expected. Of course he's also a starving student living in a high cost area so more likely it was practical needs won out over sentimental desires.
Sad that they didn't want the old photos or documents.

That is something I am trying to gather now. But then they didn't say what type of old photos - 70s? No thanks.

I like the old heavy black and white photos and the ones with the dates imprinted on the back.
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Old 03-28-2015, 11:05 AM
Status: "0-0-2 start!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,291 posts, read 15,342,559 times
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My son is 30, has his own house with his own furniture with his own style. Why would he want our stuff? Sure, he might take a piece or two (his father's favorite guitar, some of his father's tools, particularly those he likes and doesn't already have, my favorite of my mother's late 18th century clocks). Everything else he'd sell and with my blessing.
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Old 03-28-2015, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
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I bet they'll take the cash
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