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Old 07-03-2018, 07:43 PM
 
14 posts, read 5,221 times
Reputation: 80

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I have been skipping around reading posts on this thread and it's very motivating.

I have a large closet and nearly a whole basement stuffed to the gills with stuff.

My older son passed away last year and now I have a lot of his things here too. It was too painful at first to let much of it go, but I think as time goes by, I will be able to whittle it down to a few meaningful items.

My other son helped me clear his brothers house and I don't want him to someday have to move all that same stuff, plus more,when I leave this earth.
He is basically a minimalist...a bachelor.He will not want much of anything.

My goal used to be to have a house like the one in the movie "Home Alone". Filled with an excessive amount of beautiful, good quality things.
Luxurious comfort.
Now I feel like more empty space is the way to go.

I will be working on it!
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Old 07-03-2018, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Texas
202 posts, read 141,044 times
Reputation: 417
Wow. I need this thread right now. I am doing two separate projects right now.

We recently moved from a 3000 SF house with tons of built ins and lots of closets into a 2300 SF house with no built ins (well there is a wet bar that is fairly useless but does have one lower cabinet) and small closets. We sold the first house before buying this one. We knew we were going smaller but didn't know what the house would be like. So, we did so quite a bit of purging while we were packing. But, in some cases we weren't sure what to purge in that we didn't know what space we would have in the new house.

Now that we are here I realize we need to cut down on some things. For example, the old kitchen was very large. We purged stuff a couple of years ago and had lots of almost empty cabinets. But, in this house, we have much less storage space in the kitchen. So, maybe we really don't need to keep the baking dishes that we haven't used in 10 years but thought maybe we might need them someday if I were to actually start baking stuff.

We did get rid of some books. We've mostly moved to Kindle books but these are all books that aren't available on Kindle. Most of these I don't want to get rid of. However, there are some books that I've had for years that I want to reread and just haven't done it. I got rid of some that I finally decided I was never going to reread. As for the others, my project is to reread those before buying any new books and get rid of anything I don't really want to read.

The other thing I am doing is taking some things over to my mom's. And, that is the second project. My mom recently died and I am cleaning out her house. It is just me. I've actually learned a lot in that process. My mom had a very neat house and wasn't a hoarder. That is, she didn't have more stuff than she had space for. And, she had a very small house. That said, every drawer and closet was jammed full of stuff. She didn't buy a lot of stuff but she kept things forever. For example, she had a ton of blankets, most of which she never used. She had blankets from when I was a child (and I'm in my 60's!). She had towels from when I was a child. And, the new towels DH and I gave her over 20 years ago were unused in a drawer.

She had a mix of things that were really not any good (lots of used old makeup, threadbare towels, worn dresses) and new never used things (clothes with tags on them, new towels, several tablecloths). Cleaning her house out is inspiring me to be more careful about mine. I also found she saved certain things probably for sentimental reasons but she didn't really look at them. For example, she saved all of the greeting cards she received. I understand this as I save many I receive. But, I occasionally go and look through them. Hers were stored in a way that made it clear she didn't look at them. What I realize from that is to only keep sentimental stuff if you are actually going to look at it or use it or do something with it. Just having it on a dusty shelf that you never look at doesn't do much...

Why am I taking stuff to her house? We will ultimately have an estate sale of her stuff. So I am taking unused stuff of mine over there to add to the sale....
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Old 07-04-2018, 06:34 AM
 
6,313 posts, read 5,053,602 times
Reputation: 12820
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koshka2 View Post
Wow. I need this thread right now. I am doing two separate projects right now.

We recently moved from a 3000 SF house with tons of built ins and lots of closets into a 2300 SF house with no built ins (well there is a wet bar that is fairly useless but does have one lower cabinet) and small closets. We sold the first house before buying this one. We knew we were going smaller but didn't know what the house would be like. So, we did so quite a bit of purging while we were packing. But, in some cases we weren't sure what to purge in that we didn't know what space we would have in the new house.

Now that we are here I realize we need to cut down on some things. For example, the old kitchen was very large. We purged stuff a couple of years ago and had lots of almost empty cabinets. But, in this house, we have much less storage space in the kitchen. So, maybe we really don't need to keep the baking dishes that we haven't used in 10 years but thought maybe we might need them someday if I were to actually start baking stuff.

We did get rid of some books. We've mostly moved to Kindle books but these are all books that aren't available on Kindle. Most of these I don't want to get rid of. However, there are some books that I've had for years that I want to reread and just haven't done it. I got rid of some that I finally decided I was never going to reread. As for the others, my project is to reread those before buying any new books and get rid of anything I don't really want to read.

The other thing I am doing is taking some things over to my mom's. And, that is the second project. My mom recently died and I am cleaning out her house. It is just me. I've actually learned a lot in that process. My mom had a very neat house and wasn't a hoarder. That is, she didn't have more stuff than she had space for. And, she had a very small house. That said, every drawer and closet was jammed full of stuff. She didn't buy a lot of stuff but she kept things forever. For example, she had a ton of blankets, most of which she never used. She had blankets from when I was a child (and I'm in my 60's!). She had towels from when I was a child. And, the new towels DH and I gave her over 20 years ago were unused in a drawer.

She had a mix of things that were really not any good (lots of used old makeup, threadbare towels, worn dresses) and new never used things (clothes with tags on them, new towels, several tablecloths). Cleaning her house out is inspiring me to be more careful about mine. I also found she saved certain things probably for sentimental reasons but she didn't really look at them. For example, she saved all of the greeting cards she received. I understand this as I save many I receive. But, I occasionally go and look through them. Hers were stored in a way that made it clear she didn't look at them. What I realize from that is to only keep sentimental stuff if you are actually going to look at it or use it or do something with it. Just having it on a dusty shelf that you never look at doesn't do much...

Why am I taking stuff to her house? We will ultimately have an estate sale of her stuff. So I am taking unused stuff of mine over there to add to the sale....
I got rid of a lot of kitchen items once. I put everything in boxes. If I used it, it stayed. If I never used it and just sat in the box - it was out.

I still have some cookie sheets. Cake pans etc - I will just buy the disposable ones. They can be used more than once. I bake a cake maybe twice a year.

Christmas cards? After watching people hang on to them for years just "because" - I toss mine out after a few days. Has never bothered me.
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Old 07-04-2018, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Earth
238 posts, read 84,757 times
Reputation: 1013
I think I posted my story earlier, so I'll add new examples. I live with a few dogs, and by default I've inherited a generation or two of family stuff, It's been a subcareer turning my house into a very streamlined place. The other day I dumped lots of old plates and glassware. I'm very big on paper plates now. My only rule was not to toss anything less than five years old (I hate tossing new stuff), or it has exceptional sentimental value. Still, 90% ended up at the curb. I've also recently gotten rid of an old sofa.

My only indulgences are books and DVDs/Blurays. I keep them very neat and organized.
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Old 07-04-2018, 07:02 AM
 
6,313 posts, read 5,053,602 times
Reputation: 12820
Quote:
Originally Posted by westegg View Post
I think I posted my story earlier, so I'll add new examples. I live with a few dogs, and by default I've inherited a generation or two of family stuff, It's been a subcareer turning my house into a very streamlined place. The other day I dumped lots of old plates and glassware. I'm very big on paper plates now. My only rule was not to toss anything less than five years old (I hate tossing new stuff), or it has exceptional sentimental value. Still, 90% ended up at the curb. I've also recently gotten rid of an old sofa.

My only indulgences are books and DVDs/Blurays. I keep them very neat and organized.
yes - lots of paper plates in use here also.
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Old 07-04-2018, 08:44 AM
 
7,801 posts, read 4,387,974 times
Reputation: 11589
Again (since more people are reading and commenting on this; great thread), even if you're the gutsy, throw-away type, please save out your blankets, quilts, towels, and bathrobes with buttons removed for animal shelters. Often it's all these poor creatures have to separate them from cold, hard, concrete cell floors and give them some comfort. I saw some sticking out of my neighbor's trash can, and it was all I could do not to go over and fish them out.
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Old 07-04-2018, 09:22 AM
 
7,801 posts, read 4,387,974 times
Reputation: 11589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
yes - lots of paper plates in use here also.
I don't use paper plates (pollution), but I use only ONE -- from Goodwill -- plate, cup, glass, bowl, knife, fork, and spoon. Immediately wash and set to dry in sink rack (no dishwasher). It's the monk's way!
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Old 07-04-2018, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Earth
238 posts, read 84,757 times
Reputation: 1013
I admire that. My problem is even though it's just me, I've gotten too lazy to wash even one item in a sink (other than rinsing out what glassware and mugs I still have). I like paper plates suitable for microwaves. and I often have takeout entrees from delis and supermarkets, so i still have plastic trays to discard. I just hope I'm not adding that much to landfill.
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Old 07-04-2018, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Texas of course
563 posts, read 266,430 times
Reputation: 2897
Quote:
Originally Posted by westegg View Post
I admire that. My problem is even though it's just me, I've gotten too lazy to wash even one item in a sink (other than rinsing out what glassware and mugs I still have). I like paper plates suitable for microwaves. and I often have takeout entrees from delis and supermarkets, so i still have plastic trays to discard. I just hope I'm not adding that much to landfill.
Paper plates aren't a problem, they break down. Generally, if a paper plate is placed in a commercial compost facility, it will take less than 180 days to completely decompose. However, it can take as little as 45 to 60 days, depending upon the unique make and style of the paper plate. You can add most paper including bills to a compost bin, paper towels, paper napkins, paper plates, toilet paper rolls, paper cartons from eggs and berries, and even the grease-free part of your pizza boxes.
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Old 07-04-2018, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Earth
238 posts, read 84,757 times
Reputation: 1013
Thanks for the info.
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