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Old 04-07-2015, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,960 posts, read 3,451,255 times
Reputation: 10475

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Thank you vjday. I was just there today (moving in this weekend) but there are 2 huge hanging closets and a huge linen closet with enough shelves tot put canned goods.
I still have to go through my things as a lot has to go to Goodwill. I never realized the extent of my injuries and saved a lot of work clothes. Some I will keep for Church, but it makes me feel good that other women will be able to find quality work clothes at a decent price. The Lord provides for me and I want to pass that on.
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Old 04-07-2015, 07:43 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,743 posts, read 7,022,649 times
Reputation: 14219
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
I don't think so. Maybe. I'll have to look it up -- I'm probably wrong. LOL

Here -- maybe we're both right and both wrong:

Medicare - Long-Term Care Information

My mother was in a nursing home for more than 100 days -- she was going to have to start paying over $3000/mo. but she passed away before then. THEN does Medicaid kick in if the patient has no assets?? I'm asking you because I'm not sure.
Medicare pays for rehabilitation in a nursing home following a senior's hospital stay following an illness or surgery. There are time limits for this, though, following each hospital stay. Medicare does not pay for custodial or long term stays in a nursing home. Medicaid would pay for a patient who qualifies for it in a nursing home that accepts Medicaid, but the patient would need to apply for it, or have someone do it for him.
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Old 04-08-2015, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,967 posts, read 23,873,661 times
Reputation: 30810
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I got an even cheaper one that's a little smaller. If you get one, be sure and use a lot of lint catching socks and strainers - the lint that comes out is amazing. I just hang my clothes in the bathroom, turn on a big fan and a little heater in there, turn on the overhead vent fan, close the door and voila! They're dry in just a few hours and I didn't have to go to the laundry room and pay $3 per tiny load to wash and dry in their machines. I put it on a dolly with wheels, and it fits under my kitchen table (tall bistro height table).

Amazon.com: Panda Small Compact Portable Washing Machine(6-7lbs Capacity) with Spin Dryer: Appliances

I bought a Square Trade warranty on the washer, too, for 2 years. I think it cost around $30. That way, I know I'll have a working washer for at least 2 years.
That is just too cool!--or maybe warm.

Concerning the OP, my mother had a heart, lung problem for 15 years before she died. I don't think she would have handled hot hallways or elevators well.
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Old 04-08-2015, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,914,959 times
Reputation: 35196
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
But check first to make sure they are allowed. The senior subsidized apartments in MA that I know of would throw you out if you had one. There are scant closets to hide it in too so if anyone did have one they'd probably have to disguise it. Maybe put it in a box, cover it with a long tablecloth and pretend it's a table.

Those places have strict inspections either once or twice a year and they holler at people for having too much stuff. I had a friend.........they used to come around and scream at her and write her up and tell her to get rid of stuff. She did not have a lot of stuff either. My mother, in the place where they lived during the summer (snowbirds) had a stacking washer and dryer which I liked. It was in a laundry closet. But subsidized senior housing doesn't allow that either.
Whoa, if a manager ever screamed at me, the wrath of NoMoreSnowForMe would rain down upon her head! I'd be calling every possible senior advocate, HUD official, city official, you name it.

Yes, you have to hide these little washers. But that's not hard to do. I painted the box it comes in, and it fits under my little kitchen table. Just looks like extra storage box on wheels :-)

The reason these are not wanted in apt buildings, is probably mainly because of the lint that can get trapped in the pipes. I use a multi-layer lint catching system.

Plus, in subsidized housing, you can only get evicted for cause, and you have to be given the opportunity to fix any problems. So, if you get caught, you simply agree to get rid of it.

We're inspected every quarter, on average, by the different govt agencies that fund the apartments, and management. But, they're quick and not intrusive - at least not in the 2 buildings I've lived in so far. They just want to make sure things are working, so they'll pass the govt inspections - heaters, smoke alarms, stove, etc.

I can see being told you need to get rid of stuff if it's a hoarding type of situation. But, if a manager is harassing a tenant, there are plenty of advocates out there to put a stop to that nonsense. I'd be blowing up the phones and emails of the corporate office, too.
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Old 04-08-2015, 01:27 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,824 posts, read 18,826,487 times
Reputation: 33711
Nomoresnow, you have it all figured out. Smart. What I observed though was that there was no one for these people to turn to. They had a manager, usually incompetent. The manager was the enemy. I don't think the manager answered to anyone above them. But maybe it's changed now, something did change because it got so bad.

Sad thing is that a lot of these people are so old and so sick that they are unable to advocate. One poor guy got hollered at by maintenance because his apartment happened to have a garbage disposal. Not his fault--you get assigned to an apartment, there is no choice. A woman I know had so much mold in her leaky apartment that the shoes in her closet were covered in it. The place smelled and the roof leaked. Most of these people moved to other subsidized housing although they aren't supposed to as it causes too much trouble. In other words, they are treated like ****. I think maybe the New England states have some of the most run down subsidized housing that exists. By the sounds of it other states have it better. Not ALL other states because I've read articles about mistreatment of people in elderly subsidized housing elsewhere. People are "entitled" to decent humane treatment.
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Old 04-08-2015, 03:22 AM
 
26,589 posts, read 52,257,058 times
Reputation: 20397
Often the numbers don't pan out for smaller properties...

I'm responsible for a number of medical emergency generators and they may be automatic in terms or starting and stopping and that is where it stops.

Generators are only as reliable as the maintenance they receive.

Also, sensitive equipment could very well require surge protection or ups with batteries for surge and to bridge the 10 second startup that also need to be changed out on schedule.

I'm all for generators realizing they are expensive...

If Diesel, they need to be filled and precaution taken so it does not go stale... and then just how much should be kept... 8 hours, 24 hours 7 days?

If gas... either natural or propane... Natural may or may not be available in a disaster... Propane stored on site is less prone but more expensive...

Generator Electricity is expensive all around.

A true medical setting requires multiple backups... and these places are called skilled nursing facilities with bottle Oxygen, backup power, egress lighting, alarm panels, monitors and onsite engineering...
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Old 04-08-2015, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,964,817 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Sad thing is that a lot of these people are so old and so sick that they are unable to advocate. One poor guy got hollered at by maintenance because his apartment happened to have a garbage disposal. Not his fault--you get assigned to an apartment, there is no choice. A woman I know had so much mold in her leaky apartment that the shoes in her closet were covered in it. The place smelled and the roof leaked. Most of these people moved to other subsidized housing although they aren't supposed to as it causes too much trouble. In other words, they are treated like ****. I think maybe the New England states have some of the most run down subsidized housing that exists. By the sounds of it other states have it better. Not ALL other states because I've read articles about mistreatment of people in elderly subsidized housing elsewhere. People are "entitled" to decent humane treatment.
A woman I met at the senior gym had to move recently from one high-rise senior apartment in a crappy part of the next town over because of an infestation of bed bugs, traced to the old man living just under her apt. They fumigated numerous times to no avail. Luckily she found another senior apt in a nice part of town. Moving at her age (73) was really difficult with arthritis. She had help in the move but had to pack up her 3 room apt by herself.
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Old 04-08-2015, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,914,959 times
Reputation: 35196
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Nomoresnow, you have it all figured out. Smart. What I observed though was that there was no one for these people to turn to. They had a manager, usually incompetent. The manager was the enemy. I don't think the manager answered to anyone above them. But maybe it's changed now, something did change because it got so bad.

Sad thing is that a lot of these people are so old and so sick that they are unable to advocate. One poor guy got hollered at by maintenance because his apartment happened to have a garbage disposal. Not his fault--you get assigned to an apartment, there is no choice. A woman I know had so much mold in her leaky apartment that the shoes in her closet were covered in it. The place smelled and the roof leaked. Most of these people moved to other subsidized housing although they aren't supposed to as it causes too much trouble. In other words, they are treated like ****. I think maybe the New England states have some of the most run down subsidized housing that exists. By the sounds of it other states have it better. Not ALL other states because I've read articles about mistreatment of people in elderly subsidized housing elsewhere. People are "entitled" to decent humane treatment.
This sounds like a nightmare. There are so many advocates, though. There's adult protective services, HUD housing authorities, the city, state, the corporate offices, et. I just don't have much sympathy for anyone with a victim mentality.
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