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Old 04-05-2015, 10:28 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
7,629 posts, read 14,394,556 times
Reputation: 18712

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[quote=Cleveland_Collector;39104725]It's fairly simple, if you don't like the terms of what the military contract entails, don't sign it. Unless you get drafted, you really have no room to complain as it was your choice. There is also plenty of information out there for you to properly gauge your conscription.

Which brings this conversation full circle, IF you had information, and IF you decided to join the military service based on the retirement plan/benefits that were promised you, YOU should be able to expect to RECEIVE those benefits. IF changes are to be made, it should be those who join knowing the changes will affect them, not once they have served 18 yrs and all of a sudden, the changes are being forced on them.

If I rent a house from you for $1,000 per month on a 12 month "contract", you can not 5 months later jack the rate up to $1,500 because the house next to yours just rented for that much....you have to abide by the CONTRACT and raise the rate when the contract is no longer effective.

EACH person that enlists in the military signs a "contract" and it should be legal and binding, in both directions.
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Old 04-05-2015, 10:58 PM
 
950 posts, read 716,719 times
Reputation: 1615
Quote:
Originally Posted by VJDAY81445 View Post
........."Don't like the terms ? Your own damn fault"......

and if any civilian employer offered the exact same contract as the military, it would be thrown out of court if the employer refused to accept the 2 weeks notice for quiting.

I never heard of a civilian employee being locked up for attempting to quit his job.
Many military people served brig time for attempting to.

Hard to have a conversation with some one who keeps argueing yet can not give me one example of a similar civilian employment contract that would hold up in court.

I'm still waiting !


still waiting for at least one example
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Old 04-06-2015, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Northern VA
513 posts, read 635,017 times
Reputation: 621
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
You are right. There can be no real comparison and I've always thought to argue otherwise is silly.

No other employer can throw your butt into jail because you decided to sleep in one morning. No other employer can order you to return to work for them long after you have left that job for another.

Civilian employees do not surrender any significant individual rights upon accepting employment. Members of the military do. IMO, that sacrifice alone is sufficient to entitle our service members to better pay and benefits than that offered to civilians.
Lenora, thank you. I've been retired for just over 3 years now after serving for 22. Your statement I bolded sums it up perfectly. There are no civilian occupations that compare to what we ask our military to endure. By that statement I certainly don't mean to disparage police officers, firefighters, and other professions that certainly have their own hardships. However, I don't think any of those professions can require their employees to pack their bags on a moment's notice and deploy to some austere, third world country leaving their family behind for months on end. And then ask them to do the same thing over and over.

When I first got home from Desert Storm my daughter didn't even recognize me. Unless you've gone through something like that you'll never understand how hard that is.

Thankfully my deployments slowed down in my later years and I retired with all my body parts intact. Many others were not as fortunate. We should be looking for ways to help and reward service members for their sacrifice instead of trying to cut costs and providing benefits commensurate with civilian occupations.
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Old 04-06-2015, 07:03 AM
 
1,332 posts, read 2,703,918 times
Reputation: 1023
Quote:
Originally Posted by djplourd View Post
Lenora, thank you. I've been retired for just over 3 years now after serving for 22. Your statement I bolded sums it up perfectly. There are no civilian occupations that compare to what we ask our military to endure. By that statement I certainly don't mean to disparage police officers, firefighters, and other professions that certainly have their own hardships. However, I don't think any of those professions can require their employees to pack their bags on a moment's notice and deploy to some austere, third world country leaving their family behind for months on end. And then ask them to do the same thing over and over.

When I first got home from Desert Storm my daughter didn't even recognize me. Unless you've gone through something like that you'll never understand how hard that is.

Thankfully my deployments slowed down in my later years and I retired with all my body parts intact. Many others were not as fortunate. We should be looking for ways to help and reward service members for their sacrifice instead of trying to cut costs and providing benefits commensurate with civilian occupations.
Thank you for your service. My husband retired 3 years ago after 29 years and our story is similiar. It is laughable to compare civil service to military service, for all the reasons mentioned. I actually boggles my mind that people say "you volunteered" blah, blah. I say what if we hadn't volunteered? Where would this country be? We sure wouldn't have the freedom to spend hours on some forum discussing the finer points of whatever. Rant over! Sorry this is off topic, but I just couldn't take it anymore.
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Old 04-06-2015, 02:11 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 84,044,795 times
Reputation: 18051
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
I have a military pension. you retire with the pension you agreed to on your contract.

They have been changing the pension plan for years. This is nothing new.

I missed the straight 50% pension by a few months. When I retired it was the average of your last three years base pay.

When I left 10 years ago, I think it was at 40% and you had to decide at your ten year mark if you wanted a regular pension or savings plan. I might have the details wrong cuz it was so long ago, but like I said, nothing new.
Yep;even with private most do not attempt retroactive as that brings suits for breaking terms of employment which is considered a contract on compensation. Most often they change it for new. government tho maybe different has they exempt from a lot of laws on labor.
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Old 04-06-2015, 03:02 PM
 
950 posts, read 716,719 times
Reputation: 1615
Quote:
Originally Posted by VJDAY81445 View Post
........."Don't like the terms ? Your own damn fault"......

and if any civilian employer offered the exact same contract as the military, it would be thrown out of court if the employer refused to accept the 2 weeks notice for quiting.

I never heard of a civilian employee being locked up for attempting to quit his job.
Many military people served brig time for attempting to.

Hard to have a conversation with some one who keeps argueing yet can not give me one example of a similar civilian employment contract that would hold up in court.

I'm still waiting !

Still waiting for even one example
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Old 04-08-2015, 10:20 AM
 
9,232 posts, read 9,300,397 times
Reputation: 28940
Quote:
Originally Posted by LookingatFL View Post
We have a military pension and Tricare. I need to read this and will respond later.
I have a question about military retirement.

1. I know military retirees receive Tricare. Do they continue to receive Tricare after they reach the age of 65 when Medicare eligibility kicks in?

2. If so, why not simply have military retirees place on Medicare. Of course, they could choose a supplement or advantage plan if they wish.
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Old 04-08-2015, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Northern VA
513 posts, read 635,017 times
Reputation: 621
At 65 it transitions to Tricare for Life. I'm not sure of the specifics but I'll find out in 15 years.

TRICARE For Life is Medicare-wraparound coverage for TRICARE-eligible beneficiaries who have Medicare Part A and B.

Available worldwide:
TRICARE pays after Medicare in the U.S. and U.S. Territories
TRICARE is the first payer in all other overseas areas
Meets requirements for minimum essential coverage
Enrollment not required
Coverage is automatic if you have Medicare Part A and B
You must pay Medicare Part B premiums
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Old 04-08-2015, 11:17 AM
 
130 posts, read 101,620 times
Reputation: 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by djplourd View Post
At 65 it transitions to Tricare for Life. I'm not sure of the specifics but I'll find out in 15 years.

TRICARE For Life is Medicare-wraparound coverage for TRICARE-eligible beneficiaries who have Medicare Part A and B.

Available worldwide:
TRICARE pays after Medicare in the U.S. and U.S. Territories
TRICARE is the first payer in all other overseas areas
Meets requirements for minimum essential coverage
Enrollment not required
Coverage is automatic if you have Medicare Part A and B
You must pay Medicare Part B premiums
I went on Tricare for Life last June. Basically, Tricare is your "supplement" for Medicare. Outside of Medicare Part B premiums, I haven't had any out-of-pocket expenses. Rising medical expenses as we age are always a fear. As things currently stand, I think that is one area I won't need to worry about, and that is a huge burden off my shoulders.
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