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Old 04-05-2015, 08:05 AM
 
10,355 posts, read 9,382,296 times
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The change for me has been positive because retirement has afforded me emotional and physical freedom which was not available while working.

It is important to note that, for me, working outside of my home was nothing I ever wanted to do; but needing the paycheck, I worked full time for nearly 50 years. Therefore, I am now living the life I dreamed of during those years.
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Old 04-05-2015, 08:45 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
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I love what you said, Katie45 - that's me, only I was "lucky" that I could stay home to raise my child for 20 years, and worked about 20 around that. I say "lucky" in parenthesis because my husband died so early, when she was only a year old, so I had the SS to help us and some investment and insurance money.

I've been reading these retirement threads, looking for info mostly, I am 62 and retiring this month. I have my home paid off, car paid off, plenty of money, and have never been bored in my life. My grandson is 20 months old and I look forward to spending lots of time with him, also my aging Mother needs help, so between those two, I will have to find time for all my interests, like learning about nutrition, gardening, traveling, reading, movies, sewing, decorating, all sorts of things I love to do and learn about. I intend to live very healthy so I won't need much healthcare going forward, hope to get an affordable care act plan, so I can be insured for the big stuff, like breaking a bone. Heaven forbid.

It's been interesting to read the different takes on what retirement means to different folks, I think if you enjoy life in general, then retirement will also be enjoyable. I Love ME TIME too - sleeping in, leisurely breakfast, some online time, some time to walk and enjoy family and friends and nature … what could be better than that? Why wait till 70 and be old and who knows in what kind of shape? I have some savings to draw on, but hope to get along on SS and small pension, happiness does not hinge on money, that much I know for sure. As long as you have enough for a safe and content life, all the rest is just overload.
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Old 04-05-2015, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Cape Elizabeth
425 posts, read 387,495 times
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Retirement for me meant freedom. After working 35 years at a stressful job, I was fortunate enough to be able to retire with a pension and health care. It meant moving to Maine (from NJ) which is much more of "a fit" for me. It meant being able to be near my daughter, SIL and now two grands, who are a huge part of our life. I was always active in my community (10 years on the school board, plus 8 years hospice volunteer- the big one's) so when I moved to Maine I knew I wanted to do something, but also knew I wanted something without the stress of a school board type commitment. So, I was appointed to the town's Recycling committee, which has been perfect. Got involved in a federal retiree group and became the legislative liaison, which is also up my alley. Do lots of gardening. We watch the grands 3 days a week, which really is a job, but hubby is just as involved, so we can get our rest or time outs during the day. The grands feed your soul. The love is unconditional and the joy of seeing them grow and delight in life's adventures is something we treasure.

I do have a feeling of a ticking time bomb, however. I know how fortunate we are to have our health, but each day brings news of others with major life crisis, and of all ages. Right now, we have hubby's cousin's daughter (41) with stage 4 breast cancer, my first cousin's granddaughter (turning 18) with a rare leukemia for children, an older cousin just called with his diagnosis of colon cancer, spread to his liver, friends with Parkinson's - I could go on, but you just have to thank your lucky stars every day for your health, and sometimes I feel guilty for having (knock on wood) healthy kids, healthy grands, healthy hubby etc. So, I guess my day, or maybe my makeup in retirement is a mixture of contentment, dread and always gratitude.
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:23 PM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,679 posts, read 2,227,048 times
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We have both been retired for a year. Haven't been able to travel much because of my elderly mother. Now that she has passed, we can get back on track to deciding on where we are going to move to for our next chapter. Heading to Ohio (my wife was raised there and has family) and then Tennessee for our first trip.

Our regular days are pretty quiet. Up at 7 AM to go walking, then breakfast so that I can be ready for the opening of the stock market. The rest of my day is following the market mixed in with working on clearing things out of the house (three piles, take with us; donate; throw away), yard work and anything else that comes up. My wife loves to read, so she can often be found in the recliner with the iPad.

Not exciting, but it works for us. Both very happy to be out of the rat race!
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Old 04-05-2015, 12:37 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,759 posts, read 7,038,572 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katie45 View Post
The change for me has been positive because retirement has afforded me emotional and physical freedom which was not available while working.

It is important to note that, for me, working outside of my home was nothing I ever wanted to do; but needing the paycheck, I worked full time for nearly 50 years. Therefore, I am now living the life I dreamed of during those years.

So you can look at your retirement as your well earned reward. I heard retirement referred to as "the dessert of one's life" onetime, and I have never forgotten that. I think that is what I would wish for anyone retiring, even though we know things happen that make it not so much dessert!

In any case, enjoy the dessert of your life.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Chicago area
14,407 posts, read 7,926,626 times
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Retirement is something that I'm reluctant to do. When John retired nearly two years ago I became an even bigger workaholic. He does everything around the house now so I have more time to pursue my biggest hobby. Working. I don't know what's wrong with me or how to fix it. I'll probably drop dead at work from a heart attack. I just worked a double shift from pm's to nights, slept only 5 hours and I'll soon be off for a 12 mile bike ride. How in the heck am I ever going to be able to retire with this high octane mentality? I think the boredom might kill me in a month or two, or I'll kill John in a month or two, or maybe he'll just kill me. I can't retire.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:54 PM
 
30,120 posts, read 47,344,680 times
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I retired at 55 and my husband worked for about another 10. My being retired wasn't an issue with him although I had more time to visit our daughter who was married and living in another state, and when she had our first grandchild, I could go there when she or the baby were really sick. She teaches and her husband has to travel for work half the time, so they don't have a fall back really.

Before he retired, we bought house in Fl but could only make fly-in visits of week or so. Now we drive, take our pets and stay 6-8 weeks at time which is much nicer. He has his interests but hasn't really gotten back into golf which was his stress reliever/enjoyment for decades.
He got nice camera for retirement present from work but hasn't turned that into a real hobby like he though. He has been doing some garage work, adding shel ins and rubber flooring and lately has started working on guns his dad left him. He is watching more television than I ever thought he would--History channel and some reality TV--but we will also go to afternoon movie during the week...

He lost his closest friend about time I retired and didn't really bond w/anyone from work so he doesn't have anyone to really be a guy with. Sometimes he will go to movie w/our son who lives about 45min away but not often. I have good friend I can shop with and talk to and she goes out to eat with us or to movies regularly, so I am not really lonesome. But I do wish my husband had someone he could spend time with. But we have always said we are each other's best friends so maybe he is ok. I never get lonesome by myself...
We go visit his sister who lives 4 hrs away more often and sometimes she comes to us.

We are both in good health but starting to slow down...need to exercise more but my knees sometimes make walking difficult...haven't seen specialist because don't want to have surgery. We really enjoy spending time with our grandson. This summer in FL we will have him for week or so while his mom and dad take vacation and we normally see a good bit of him anytime we are there.

right now think we are both pretty happy with situation.
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Old 04-05-2015, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Sugarmill Woods , FL
6,235 posts, read 5,903,542 times
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Since I retired 4 years ago, I have gotten very used to having NO schedule. Sleep late, have late breakfast/brunch (which I am now making) every day. We moved to Florida and hit the pool almost every day, stay up until after midnight almost every night, and enjoy the night air on our lanai with a bourbon and cigar. Life is good!
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Old 04-05-2015, 03:18 PM
 
30,120 posts, read 47,344,680 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
Retirement is something that I'm reluctant to do. When John retired nearly two years ago I became an even bigger workaholic. He does everything around the house now so I have more time to pursue my biggest hobby. Working. I don't know what's wrong with me or how to fix it. I'll probably drop dead at work from a heart attack. I just worked a double shift from pm's to nights, slept only 5 hours and I'll soon be off for a 12 mile bike ride. How in the heck am I ever going to be able to retire with this high octane mentality? I think the boredom might kill me in a month or two, or I'll kill John in a month or two, or maybe he'll just kill me. I can't retire.
Don't know you but I was always the person who was nuts about bringing stress of work home--especially after I went back to teaching and was grading all the time. But I was also the "housekeeper" even when working full time. My husband has no interest in cooking or cleaning although he will do grocery shopping and has always done all bill-paying/bookkeeping. And he can do laundry if necessary.
Could it be that you don't feel that you have a place at home if you retire?
Or that you subconsciously don't rate taking care of house that high? Personally I don't either. I have a great cleaner who comes once a week when we are at our TX house and basically don't do much other work except laundry, ironing (which I love), and some cooking.

Some articles I have read about men retiring is that they fear being alone with their wives for so much longer than when working and not having anything to talk about.
If you want purpose in your life, I am sure you can find many volunteer opportunities that would make a difference...
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Old 04-05-2015, 03:27 PM
 
1,574 posts, read 581,532 times
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Hello! I am an early retiree, RIF'ed and then took early retirement. Due to multiple health issues I had used up all vacation time being sick and in hospital off and on for about 10 years, and gone to work and stayed at work sick, hanging on to my health insurance. Being retired, one of the great joys is waking up and knowing I do not have to go to work! However, I am a full-time care-taker at home, too. So what we do, is try to continually be frugal and stretch our money. The health insurance takes all but a fraction of my pension, so there is not much to live on. We live on interest and dividends and scrape by, never touching the principal of our investments. We are grateful for what we do have -- it is a tremendous blessing to be able to do this! So, for me -- the biggest Retirement change has been the reduction in income combined with the huge increase in health insurance costs and rising cost of living [groceries, utilities, and medicines], and figuring out how to stretch-out income, along with being able to stay home.
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