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Old 08-30-2015, 10:44 AM
 
178 posts, read 179,625 times
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I was forced to retire as a police officer at age 53 when I broke my back and had surgery.
I was given a pension of 50% of base salary and tax exempt. Unable to work much due to my physical limitations now at age 58.
No one wants to hire a disabled retired cop at age 58 with my work experience as I couldn't even work as a security guard to supplement my income because I could not physically perform.

So, I try and stay busy each day to some degree. Always in pain. Take my pills and think of days gone by when I was healthy and strong. I wish I could be more productive and since I am unable to gain employment I may volunteer at the VA Medical Center.

Thank G*d I have my healthcare via VA because 1/3 of my police / state retirement income would have gone to healthcare! I always thought a retired and or disabled police officers should have free healthcare for their service such as a veteran - i.e. VA Health.
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Old 08-30-2015, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,852,811 times
Reputation: 6379
Quote:
Originally Posted by anjcohen View Post
I was forced to retire as a police officer at age 53 when I broke my back and had surgery.
I was given a pension of 50% of base salary and tax exempt. Unable to work much due to my physical limitations now at age 58.
No one wants to hire a disabled retired cop at age 58 with my work experience as I couldn't even work as a security guard to supplement my income because I could not physically perform.

So, I try and stay busy each day to some degree. Always in pain. Take my pills and think of days gone by when I was healthy and strong. I wish I could be more productive and since I am unable to gain employment I may volunteer at the VA Medical Center.

Thank G*d I have my healthcare via VA because 1/3 of my police / state retirement income would have gone to healthcare! I always thought a retired and or disabled police officers should have free healthcare for their service such as a veteran - i.e. VA Health.

Thank you for your service as a cop and veteran.
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Old 08-30-2015, 07:38 PM
 
2,742 posts, read 727,575 times
Reputation: 7096
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfingduo View Post
Thank you for your service as a cop and veteran.
Ditto. So sorry your retirement is painful. Hope you get some enjoyment.
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Old 08-30-2015, 08:42 PM
 
109 posts, read 103,830 times
Reputation: 185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
It's surprising to people outside of education but not to educators. Many of the reasons people entered the field are rapidily disappearing. It has become a much more regimented and inflexible job. At the same time, support of education, and teachers, has diminished as changes in the nature of work has tasked education to provide a solution to a global shortage of good-paying jobs for the masses. Education has become the focus of solving the job crisis and has resulted in driving adult skills and concepts down to younger students. It is no surprise to those who have been working with children for many years that children still need to go through the natural stages of growth and development. Few kindergarten teachers see a 5 year old as a global competitor needing to follow a rigid time line that demonstrate their ability to master reading rich literature and working with advanced mathematical algorithms. The reasons they entered the field were to help the children learn about the world around them, acquire critical listening and observation skills, cultivate curiosity, and develop personal interest. Education's goal is to provide students not only with foundational skills and concepts but to ignite a life-long love of learning.
Well said. Exactly the reasons I chose to leave the profession I felt I was called to, and from which I gained tremendous gratification and joy for 16 years. The reasons I entered the field were precisely those you stated. The school day became filled with so much paperwork, documentation and testing. Teaching became "following a regimented academic program."
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Old 08-30-2015, 09:07 PM
 
109 posts, read 103,830 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
As for teachers, there are lots of women whose husbands earn a good living in some other profession, which means they can just get out without worrying about maximizing their teaching pensions.
This was how I was able to leave teaching after 16 years. I got a late start on my career, getting my degree once my children were off to school, and began teaching at age 36. By the time I had completed 16 years of teaching, my husband's career was solid and he was making enough to support us (after we worked diligently the two years prior to my departure to pay off debt and put aside a reserve for the couple of years I expected to take off before beginning another job search.)

As it turned out, I never sought out a new career. I'm taking care of my grandchild three days each week now, and doing a bit of tutoring now and then, and couldn't be more happy or fulfilled. We were nervous about how things would work out financially, and my pension and SS will take a hit as a result of getting out when I did. We've adapted to a more frugal lifestyle, which will be good training for retirement. Despite the reduction in discretionary spending, we have found our lives more enjoyable, richer, and meaningful since I left. I don't regret quitting, but I do miss what teaching used to be. If the profession had not evolved into following scripted lesson plans, test administrations, and laborious documentation requirements, I'd probably still be teaching today.

But in the end, without my husband's moral and financial support, I would not be able to do what I'm doing today. In that regard, I know I am quite fortunate.
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Old 08-30-2015, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,259 posts, read 3,025,579 times
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I retired one week after I made our last mortgage payment. I was 63 and I am now 81.
So much for that rubbish of dying at 65.
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Old 08-31-2015, 04:45 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,852,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by engineman View Post
I retired one week after I made our last mortgage payment. I was 63 and I am now 81.
So much for that rubbish of dying at 65.

I hope that life begins at 65. Grats on 81.
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Old 09-01-2015, 10:12 AM
 
3,945 posts, read 3,266,434 times
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I'll throw in here by saying that the work you've done for most of your life has a lot to do with the decision of when to retire. If your work is physically demanding then it stands to reason you are going to be a lot more beat up than the accountant who had less exposure to muscle strains, toxic chemicals, or just the mind numbing tasks that make up the workday for so many.

When you wake up sore, fatigued, and dreading the day, you know it's time to hang it up. I ended my work days in 07 at age 62, never regretted the decision to move on, I do miss the people I liked at work but the company was sprinting toward the new age corp thinking of lean and mean. They were leveraging that BS to ridiculous levels, at 62 I wasn't thrilled to be in attendance at the various meetings wherein the upper command went to great lengths to explain that while we were going to lose our jobs it was for the betterment of the company and it's shareholders.

This type of thread has been labored on to the extent that many are now fully aware of the fact of retirement being a highly individualistic thing, it's not unlike choosing your clothing or color of your house. Most of us worked because we had to, period. Some loved their work and many didn't, but aging at the job allows little when one considers the fact of time being the essence of living life your way..
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Old 09-01-2015, 01:38 PM
 
284 posts, read 259,870 times
Reputation: 715
My husband retired at 55 from a 30 year job he grew to hate. He now works part time and loves what he does. I'll be eligible to retire in a year and will be pulling the trigger at either 56 or 57. We both feel very fortunate to be able to retire while still relatively young. There's lots of things we hope to do!
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Old 09-01-2015, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,136 posts, read 12,395,557 times
Reputation: 13986
I start retiring on January 1st when I take on a four day work week (every Friday off) while taking a 20% cut in pay.

On July 1st I will take on a three day work week (every Monday and Friday off) for another 20% cut in pay and during this time I will celebrate my 68th birthday. Three days will be my time on training wheels because what I receive after taxes working 3 days is about what I can expect from social security if I start drawing at 68.

On January 1st, 2015 I will start working one day a week, probably Wednesday when I feel like it, and live down a bit so I can put off drawing ss until I am 70 for the increased benefit. At this time the big question would be could my wife and I survive on $2,045/month which would be the amount left over AFTER we paid our Medicare Part B (it went up), our supplements and dental insurance? Can we live on the equivalent of $472 per week so I don't have to draw my ss benefit???
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