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Old 04-08-2015, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,685 posts, read 49,455,573 times
Reputation: 19134

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
That's the key...if you are happy working, there's no need to retire.
I agree.

All things being equal, and assuming that you are allowed to do it, then stay in a career that you enjoy.



Most of my former co-workers were between 18 and 24 years old. After working 4 to 6 years most of them leave to find other careers. A surprisingly high rate of them will have some form of disability after working just 4 years. Keep working into your mid-to-late 30's and you might be the oldest man on-site.

To stay after your mid-30s, is normally a matter of if you can continue to work, at the same pace, with your particular combination of disabilities.

My employer has a High-Year-Tenure [HYT] policy. How high you ascend up in pay-grade determines how many years you can stay. I made my way 'up' to a pay-grade that allowed me to stay for 20 years. Had I ascended one more pay-grade than the HYT policy would have allowed me to stay a couple more years [but I am not sure if my body would have allowed me to do that].

Due to my pay-grade I was forced onto pension when I reached 20 years of service. HYT is a way of ensuring that it remains a career of mostly young people, even if you can work for 20 years without showing any disabilities, HYT forces you onto pension because of your age.

At my last location, some of my co-workers were really struggling with their combinations of disabilities, as they tried to keep up the pace to serve a 'full' 20 years.

My career became who I was. It became my identity. The long hours, years of training, sacrifice of personal life and so much time-zone leaping can wear on a person [not to mention the focus on killing people].

I am glad I retired when I did.

I was not a happy camper. 2/3 through my career, I had became very dis-enfranchised with employer policies [I handled a lot of stuff that like Edward Snowden the public really needs to know about. But to tell the public is a felony. The burden of knowing and working with so much data about bad things my employer was doing, wore on me].

If anyone can find a career they are happy with, I can see staying in that career. But I am glad that I retired.
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Old 04-08-2015, 09:16 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,896 posts, read 42,133,814 times
Reputation: 43304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I agree.

All things being equal, and assuming that you are allowed to do it, then stay in a career that you enjoy.



Most of my former co-workers were between 18 and 24 years old. After working 4 to 6 years most of them leave to find other careers. A surprisingly high rate of them will have some form of disability after working just 4 years. Keep working into your mid-to-late 30's and you might be the oldest man on-site.

To stay after your mid-30s, is normally a matter of if you can continue to work, at the same pace, with your particular combination of disabilities.

My employer has a High-Year-Tenure [HYT] policy. How high you ascend up in pay-grade determines how many years you can stay. I made my way 'up' to a pay-grade that allowed me to stay for 20 years. Had I ascended one more pay-grade than the HYT policy would have allowed me to stay a couple more years [but I am not sure if my body would have allowed me to do that].

Due to my pay-grade I was forced onto pension when I reached 20 years of service. HYT is a way of ensuring that it remains a career of mostly young people, even if you can work for 20 years without showing any disabilities, HYT forces you onto pension because of your age.

At my last location, some of my co-workers were really struggling with their combinations of disabilities, as they tried to keep up the pace to serve a 'full' 20 years.

My career became who I was. It became my identity. The long hours, years of training, sacrifice of personal life and so much time-zone leaping can wear on a person [not to mention the focus on killing people].

I am glad I retired when I did.

I was not a happy camper. 2/3 through my career, I had became very dis-enfranchised with employer policies [I handled a lot of stuff that like Edward Snowden the public really needs to know about. But to tell the public is a felony. The burden of knowing and working with so much data about bad things my employer was doing, wore on me].

If anyone can find a career they are happy with, I can see staying in that career. But I am glad that I retired.

Well, yeah. Your specialty is noted for people having issues. I know several like yourself and they all have something wrong directly connected to what you did.

I'm being circumspect because I don't know how many realize what you're talking about.
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Old 04-10-2015, 04:54 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Well, yeah. Your specialty is noted for people having issues. I know several like yourself and they all have something wrong directly connected to what you did.

I'm being circumspect because I don't know how many realize what you're talking about.
His user name tells what he is talking about, and he has not been secretive when asked about it. Still, I have often wondered why he doesn't just say "the Navy" instead of "my employer".
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Old 04-10-2015, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,685 posts, read 49,455,573 times
Reputation: 19134
Since retiring, I have been told many times to speak in civilian terms.
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Old 04-10-2015, 07:14 AM
 
8,204 posts, read 11,915,499 times
Reputation: 17999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
His user name tells what he is talking about, and he has not been secretive when asked about it. Still, I have often wondered why he doesn't just say "the Navy" instead of "my employer".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Since retiring, I have been told many times to speak in civilian terms.
LOL. It's not as if you were working for the CIA or NSA.
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Old 04-10-2015, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,685 posts, read 49,455,573 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
LOL. It's not as if you were working for the CIA or NSA.
Right. I am just the average submariner. During most of my working career, I lived underwater on average 7 months per year. Rotating shift-work, most of my 'off-crew' days were spent in 'trainers' [schools].

Everyone says they hate servicemembers using so much military jargon. So I try to avoid and speak in 'civilian'. Is that offensive too?
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Old 04-10-2015, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Right. I am just the average submariner. During most of my working career, I lived underwater on average 7 months per year. Rotating shift-work, most of my 'off-crew' days were spent in 'trainers' [schools].

Everyone says they hate servicemembers using so much military jargon. So I try to avoid and speak in 'civilian'. Is that offensive too?
It is not at all offensive to me, but "the Navy" is hardly a military jargon term and is understood and used by all civilians. I don't blame you for avoiding military jargon. Most professions have jargon, to a greater or lesser extent, and in general it's a good thing to avoid the jargon when talking to civilians.
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Old 04-10-2015, 11:36 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,896 posts, read 42,133,814 times
Reputation: 43304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
His user name tells what he is talking about, and he has not been secretive when asked about it. Still, I have often wondered why he doesn't just say "the Navy" instead of "my employer".
There are people on here who would think he made sandwiches at Subway. Well, maybe not in the Retirement Forum, but you know there are dummies roaming the rest.
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Old 04-10-2015, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,785 posts, read 4,838,667 times
Reputation: 19463
I think the jargon people hate is when people say something like..."Well I worked in AWACS on a SAC base in OKC, I spent all day at CBPO and I didn't have time to make it to the BX and my wife went AWOL with the BAQ/BAS."

I think most everybody can handle the word "Navy" or "the military". ;^) (wink)
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Old 04-10-2015, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,691 posts, read 33,695,295 times
Reputation: 51914
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
I have encountered the same thing. Most of the people that I am hanging with are 10-12 years older than me. There is just not much that I can do about that other than listen to all their stories of love, sex and rock and roll, all of which I pretty much missed. I don't think that much will change for a while.
I think, in my case, it may have to do with being on the front end (first 5 years) of the generation waiting for the rest of the baby boomer generation (1946 - 1964) to "catch up" and retire. So, when I was 55 and retiring, the 65 year olds and older who were retiring (most retirees) at that time were from the generation before mine. We don't have the same shared experiences, music, movies, ways of communicating, traditions, etc...as it turns out, I'll be the 65 year old retired baby boomer when the 55 year old baby boomers retire. I'm thinking it will be easier for them than it was for me because of shared generational experiences.

I suspect I'll start to meet more people like me in 2 years when they start retiring at 65. I do activity based things with the people older than me now but they aren't "hang-out"/social type friends.
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