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Old 04-11-2015, 06:02 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,472 posts, read 5,142,736 times
Reputation: 3528

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
I find it interesting way more educators are posting about their early retirements here than you'd find in the general population.
It's surprising to people outside of education but not to educators. Many of the reasons people entered the field are rapidily disappearing. It has become a much more regimented and inflexible job. At the same time, support of education, and teachers, has diminished as changes in the nature of work has tasked education to provide a solution to a global shortage of good-paying jobs for the masses. Education has become the focus of solving the job crisis and has resulted in driving adult skills and concepts down to younger students. It is no surprise to those who have been working with children for many years that children still need to go through the natural stages of growth and development. Few kindergarten teachers see a 5 year old as a global competitor needing to follow a rigid time line that demonstrate their ability to master reading rich literature and working with advanced mathematical algorithms. The reasons they entered the field were to help the children learn about the world around them, acquire critical listening and observation skills, cultivate curiosity, and develop personal interest. Education's goal is to provide students not only with foundational skills and concepts but to ignite a life-long love of learning.
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Old 04-11-2015, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
It's surprising to people outside of education but not to educators. Many of the reasons people entered the field are rapidily disappearing. It has become a much more regimented and inflexible job. At the same time, support of education, and teachers, has diminished as changes in the nature of work has tasked education to provide a solution to a global shortage of good-paying jobs for the masses. Education has become the focus of solving the job crisis and has resulted in driving adult skills and concepts down to younger students. It is no surprise to those who have been working with children for many years that children still need to go through the natural stages of growth and development. Few kindergarten teachers see a 5 year old as a global competitor needing to follow a rigid time line that demonstrate their ability to master reading rich literature and working with advanced mathematical algorithms. The reasons they entered the field were to help the children learn about the world around them, acquire critical listening and observation skills, cultivate curiosity, and develop personal interest. Education's goal is to provide students not only with foundational skills and concepts but to ignite a life-long love of learning.
I was a high school teacher in public schools for 34 years, between 1971 and 2005. You hit the nail squarely on the head in the above post, Lincolnian. I took the liberty of bolding your sentence which, for me, expresses the crux of the matter. That was my experience too - the experience of a job which was becoming more and more regimented and inflexible.

I started my teaching career late in life - at age 27. So my 34 years brought me to age 61. Retiring earlier than age 61 would have resulted in a large hit to the pension. I don't know how many people reading this will consider retiring at 61 "early" - I consider it early in retrospect - but I was ready to call it quits.

I don't know how so many people manage to afford to retire at age 55 or even younger unless their pensions are structured more generously than mine, or unless they were not in education and earned big bucks. As for teachers, there are lots of women whose husbands earn a good living in some other profession, which means they can just get out without worrying about maximizing their teaching pensions.

Last edited by Escort Rider; 04-11-2015 at 06:47 AM..
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Old 04-11-2015, 07:01 AM
 
8,181 posts, read 11,902,987 times
Reputation: 17929
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Right. I am just the average submariner. During most of my working career, I lived underwater on average 7 months per year. Rotating shift-work, most of my 'off-crew' days were spent in 'trainers' [schools].

Everyone says they hate servicemembers using so much military jargon. So I try to avoid and speak in 'civilian'. Is that offensive too?
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheShadow View Post
I think the jargon people hate is when people say something like..."Well I worked in AWACS on a SAC base in OKC, I spent all day at CBPO and I didn't have time to make it to the BX and my wife went AWOL with the BAQ/BAS."

I think most everybody can handle the word "Navy" or "the military". ;^) (wink)
LOL. Exactly.

Saying that you retired from the Navy is not speaking in "military jargon."
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Old 04-11-2015, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,472 posts, read 5,142,736 times
Reputation: 3528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I was a high school teacher in public schools for 34 years, between 1971 and 2005. You hit the nail squarely on the head in the above post, Lincolnian. I took the liberty of bolding your sentence which, for me, expresses the crux of the matter. That was my experience too - the experience of a job which was becoming more and more regimented and inflexible.

I started my teaching career late in life - at age 27. So my 34 years brought me to age 61. Retiring earlier than age 61 would have resulted in a large hit to the pension. I don't know how many people reading this will consider retiring at 61 "early" - I consider it early in retrospect - but I was ready to call it quits.
I started later as well. I am looking at early retirement in 3 years at 55 with 24 years even though it would be much more financially prudent to go to 60 since my pension would be nearly double. I am a life-long learner and enjoy learning about new things that students are interested in as much as they do. Now, education has become very homogeneous and everyone is expected to be reading from a similar script (driven by outside special interests) so that all students receive a "common experience." I moved into education from industry for the creative aspect of the job and took a big pay cut at the time which took me 10 years to match my exit salary. I have maintained many diverse interests and connections and am preparing myself financially to move on to the next stage.
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Old 04-11-2015, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Virginia
8,113 posts, read 12,679,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
I started later as well. I am looking at early retirement in 3 years at 55 with 24 years even though it would be much more financially prudent to go to 60 since my pension would be nearly double. I am a life-long learner and enjoy learning about new things that students are interested in as much as they do. Now, education has become very homogeneous and everyone is expected to be reading from a similar script (driven by outside special interests) so that all students receive a "common experience." I moved into education from industry for the creative aspect of the job and took a big pay cut at the time which took me 10 years to match my exit salary. I have maintained many diverse interests and connections and am preparing myself financially to move on to the next stage.
My target is age 55 with 33 years. I can get unreduced state pension at age 52 with 30 years, which provides 51% of my highest three years' salary. We have an additional county plan that provides 25%, but it's not unreduced until age 55.
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Old 04-11-2015, 08:45 AM
 
125 posts, read 198,984 times
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55. I'm single so it was much easier to prepare for retirement with a lot less variables in life. If you love your job you're very fortunate and in the minority. But for most people that's not the case. Retirement is the grand prize after many years in the rat race. Its wonderful to stop and smell the roses..daily!
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Old 04-11-2015, 10:34 AM
 
2,744 posts, read 987,380 times
Reputation: 3203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I was a high school teacher in public schools for 34 years, between 1971 and 2005. You hit the nail squarely on the head in the above post, Lincolnian. I took the liberty of bolding your sentence which, for me, expresses the crux of the matter. That was my experience too - the experience of a job which was becoming more and more regimented and inflexible.

I started my teaching career late in life - at age 27. So my 34 years brought me to age 61. Retiring earlier than age 61 would have resulted in a large hit to the pension. I don't know how many people reading this will consider retiring at 61 "early" - I consider it early in retrospect - but I was ready to call it quits.

I don't know how so many people manage to afford to retire at age 55 or even younger unless their pensions are structured more generously than mine, or unless they were not in education and earned big bucks. As for teachers, there are lots of women whose husbands earn a good living in some other profession, which means they can just get out without worrying about maximizing their teaching pensions.
Very well said by both of you. I'm also a similar case moving from the private field to education 31 years ago. I also gave up financially but the education field back then was a joy in itself. Now a days it's become more bureaucratic, preparing students for exams that do little to expand their knowledge but are used to trash educators. I love teaching the kids but it's no longer enjoyable seeing money siphoned off to prop up companies that do not care about education and are more interested in making a buck out of it and politicians getting their hands on it. I will be retired in 5 years at 62 and I'm ready to move on. Sadly that's the case with many of the best teachers I know and few if any of the new ones will be around past their 5th year
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Old 04-11-2015, 11:47 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,875 posts, read 42,085,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
I started later as well. I am looking at early retirement in 3 years at 55 with 24 years even though it would be much more financially prudent to go to 60 since my pension would be nearly double. I am a life-long learner and enjoy learning about new things that students are interested in as much as they do. Now, education has become very homogeneous and everyone is expected to be reading from a similar script (driven by outside special interests) so that all students receive a "common experience." I moved into education from industry for the creative aspect of the job and took a big pay cut at the time which took me 10 years to match my exit salary. I have maintained many diverse interests and connections and am preparing myself financially to move on to the next stage.
I could have gone at 55 with 25 years (like you, I didn't start until I was 30) but, like you, the pension accrual between 55 and 60 was too large to give up.

And, when I was 55, I was still having fun. Not so the last couple years so I went on extended sick leave at the end of this past October. Common Core, FfT, canned lesson plans, pacing guides and near constant informal observations (FfT) finally got to me. Having to prepare a lesson plan for a formal observation under FfT was a minimum of 8 hours.

I had just under 2 years of sick leave when I left. When I officially retire in June I'll have a year remaining. I'll be leaving $70K or so on the table.

It's worth it.
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Old 04-11-2015, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,767 posts, read 4,825,615 times
Reputation: 19387
Wow Laura, I could have written that (post #80) myself. As one of the late boomers (born in '59) I am retired but most of my same age friends will be working until they are 65. So for now, since we moved away from our old friends, we seem to be friends with people at least 10 years older than me and I like them for doing activities with, but they are just not the folks that "hang out" well with us. (What!?? What do you mean you don't like Led Zeppelin??!!) Many seem more like our parents' friends than our friends.

We were able to retire pretty early due to many years with our pension-paying employers. The pension formulas were pretty standard, 2%@55 times your years of service. Hubby had 34, I only had 24 years but had a very good final compensation rate for the last 3 years, so it all worked out well. A bigger pension would have been nice, but really wasn't necessary, so we live in "comfort" rather than "luxury". We're happy and still sane, so it was worth it.

Last edited by TheShadow; 04-11-2015 at 01:39 PM..
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Old 04-11-2015, 05:32 PM
 
Location: On the road
5,922 posts, read 2,883,413 times
Reputation: 11308
I retired at 46, it was fairly recent so still getting into the groove of it.

Observation #1 = There sure are a lot less people at the lake fishing during the day on weekdays, and a heck of a lot of MILFs with strollers at the grocery store.

Observation #2 = I like having more time to fix lunch at home, eating a lot more salads and healthy things
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