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Old 04-23-2015, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,652 posts, read 3,235,973 times
Reputation: 11907

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red On The Noodle View Post
Better subsidized housing than homeless and living under a bridge. . .in the winter

Well said, Red On The Noodle.

I worked for many years for a large company, would have had a pretty decent retirement had I stayed put. However, I made some lousy choices, ended up without a job, life got turned upside-down for a while. But that is when I learned what I was "made of."

I am currently living in a "subsidized" apartment, newly built, very pretty, very nice. I have no issue with what I call home. I do plan to relocate in September but that is a whole different story.

I think if more people would pay attention to what he have and quit looking to see what their neighbor has they would be better off. For too many years I felt very jealous of other people who remained with the company I ended up leaving who received wonderful retirement money and can do a lot of great, fun things. But living with jealousy puts a hole in your soul and you become bitter and people really do not want to be around you anymore.

It's all about attitude and taking responsibility for the decisions we make. You have to re-invent yourself and stop brooding over what you "could have had."

Remember that old saying when life hands you lemons you make lemonade.

Try it. It works!
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Old 04-23-2015, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley
4,054 posts, read 9,102,887 times
Reputation: 3419
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
That's what a single person gets. And all the senior low income housing here that we have found comes with cable and internet. They are very nice apartments. I wouldn't mind living there.
Yes, a friend had one in AZ that I quite liked, it was small but beautiful!
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Old 04-23-2015, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Cochise County, AZ
1,316 posts, read 832,470 times
Reputation: 2864
Found this interesting article today: Health law brings growth in food stamps in some states
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Old 04-23-2015, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,723,738 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
.............
I think if more people would pay attention to what he have and quit looking to see what their neighbor has they would be better off. For too many years I felt very jealous of other people who remained with the company I ended up leaving who received wonderful retirement money and can do a lot of great, fun things. But living with jealousy puts a hole in your soul and you become bitter and people really do not want to be around you anymore.

It's all about attitude and taking responsibility for the decisions we make. You have to re-invent yourself and stop brooding over what you "could have had."
........................
Great post, NYgal2NC! You have shared some profound wisdom with us there. And for many (I include myself) it takes way too long to learn that lesson.

And I have a decent retirement - no complaints at all. But while I was working as a high school teacher, I compared myself to several cousins who were pulling in the big bucks and to my sister whose house was featured in the local paper and I felt like a failure in life.

We can look up above us and feel like a failure, or we can look down below us and feel fortunate. I also had some cousins who were life-long losers, but I compared myself to the ones "above". I now know that I am very, very fortunate to have the secure retirement I have; life is good, and I was a damn fool when younger.
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Old 04-23-2015, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,323,056 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
If #2 has her $200,000 in a retirement account, i.e. 401K, IRA, etc. she is more likely to be eligible for food stamps and other assistance.

Here's why: homes are not "countable assets" nor are funds in a retirement account. Folks older than 60 reduce their income when excess medical costs (over $35/month) are subtracted from the income, as are excess shelter costs (includes utility allowance of $406/month, home insurance, and real estate taxes), a standard deduction and if she is still working, an extra 20% deduction from her wages.

A final net income of $1200/month is well over the $973/mth maximum net income allowed for eligibility for food stamps. #1 would lose out in this scenario. However, because #2 is eligible for food stamps, she is also automatically eligible for a "free phone". Not so #1. A generous housing subsidy? It depends on where #1 and #2 live.

If #2 has $200,000 in taxable accounts, she could still move into subsidized housing depending on her state of residence or, more likely, she will receive a break on her property taxes. In my state, she could end up paying no property taxes and $0 in income taxes.

It's complicated. Only if you are uninformed (as most folks are in these matters) would you choose #1.
Well said!
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Old 04-23-2015, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,323,056 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
I might have done what a lot of people did whom my wife and I knew in Sacramento due to our profession as political and legislative analysts - also a potential career choice for someone with a political science degree. I would have moved to a capitol city and pounded the pavement to find a position as a legislative (well) paid intern or a field or capitol staffer for one of the members. I would also have sought work for one of the many lobbying firms/organizations as well as state offices of legislation, one of which almost every department has. Put all of those together and you're talking hundreds of possibilities in one state alone.
Really, until probably the late 1980s or early 1990s, many state governments were regularly hiring college grads with liberal arts degrees for various administrative positions like program managers or coordinators. When I started in IT, a lot of managers in data processing didn't have any kind of computer background at all but were the liaisons between users and the nerdy techy types who wrote computer programs.

This is just more ol' Freemkt's continual whiney excuse making.
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Old 04-23-2015, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,234 posts, read 7,261,054 times
Reputation: 6700
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
It's not what most of us want our senior years to look like but it's not tin cups, cat food, and street corners either. I've gotten a real education on this lately!

I will call my hypothetical person Dave. Dave lived in NYC and was of very moderate means. He could never afford to buy a home or an apartment so he rented all his life. He decides to move to Las Vegas because of the weather and lower cost of living. He has enough money to move all his stuff here with a few thousand left in the bank. Not a lot by any means. He is 65. He never married and has no children. He does have a disability. He fell when he was 62 and injured his knee then developed Traumatic Osteo-Arthritis. He walks with a cane but he is not in bad shape and can walk for miles. By trade, he was a restaurant server/manager, jobs he could no longer do after his injury.

Just to make the math easy, he makes $1000 per month, including SSD and a small union pension. When he gets to NV, he applies for low income senior housing. It will be an apartment on the bus line. 1BR, 1BA and there will be a pool, clubhouse, and all the usual apartment amenities. The apartments are actually quite nice and pretty new. His rent, utilities included, will be 1/3 of his income. $333 per month and it includes cable, internet, and he can keep his apartment set on 70 all summer long and not get a $400 electric bill. If he gets an apartment in the most likely complex, he will probably be able to do most everything on foot. Not bad. Remember, Dave never owned anything so apartment living is just fine. It's all he knows.

He gets $200 in SNAP every month(actually $194 but we are making the math easy) to use for food, effectively bringing his income up to $1200 per month. He worked enough to get get Medicare A and B. Medicaid pays his monthly premium and provides his part C/D services for free. So he has complete coverage and pays nothing. Medicaid also gives him a free landline phone and a cellphone. And if Dave ever needs a nursing home it will be free. And most likely it will be the same nursing home where we could end up.

Dave does not drive. He can chose to pay $30 per month for a senior bus pass or $2 per day for 24 hour passes. To make it easy we'll give him the monthly pass.

He gets $1200 per month and his expenses total $363. Assuming he spends the SNAP money on food as he is supposed to do, he is left with $637 in completely disposable income, $7600 per year. And because he has a Medicaid card, he could go to several food pantries each month to supplement his income. He just has to sign up. For something to do he does volunteer work at those food pantries every month.

Dave already has all his household goods. We have great thrift stores here and you can dress well almost for nothing. Maybe once a year he will have to buy underwear or a new pair of jeans. Clothing he can get by with $100 per year.

It's not a grand lifestyle but it's not bad either. And if he saves a lot of his disposable income, he can afford a couple trips a year. Or something like new furniture or a TV. Really if you account for the difference in rent, he will do much better here than in NYC. And the waiting list for low income senior housing is years long in NYC and chances are it would be in an area that was not safe.

There are some drawbacks. He can never have more than X dollars in the bank so if he wants to save for something, he has to save cash. And it will take several months to get his low income housing so he has to stay with relatives till that comes through. Dave would actually prefer to continue working but he can't. Even if he was able to find a job, he would lose his benefits. And chances are any job he could find here would not pay enough to make up for what he would lose.

When Dave turns 66, FRA, his SSD will convert to SS and he may get a bit of a raise. But since he will have Medicaid, he still won't be able to work.
A lot of how happy you are in retirement depends on what kind of activities you pursue. I have a couple hobbies that actually bring in a bit of income some months. I enjoy my time in the shop and I don't spend much on tools unless I know they will pay for their cost. I love to read and books and DVDs are free at my Library. I don't smoke or drink with the exception of a cocktail or bottle of wine with a meal once or twice a month. I am a good cook and when I get tired of my cooking I have three or four lady friends that are great cooks. I don't get S.N.A.P but I have gone to local Food Net distributions several times to get groceries when money was tight. Food Net is also a great place to meet interesting but broke ladies but don't tell anyone LOL.
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Old 04-24-2015, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
Reputation: 27573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Great post, NYgal2NC! You have shared some profound wisdom with us there. And for many (I include myself) it takes way too long to learn that lesson.

And I have a decent retirement - no complaints at all. But while I was working as a high school teacher, I compared myself to several cousins who were pulling in the big bucks and to my sister whose house was featured in the local paper and I felt like a failure in life.

We can look up above us and feel like a failure, or we can look down below us and feel fortunate. I also had some cousins who were life-long losers, but I compared myself to the ones "above". I now know that I am very, very fortunate to have the secure retirement I have; life is good, and I was a damn fool when younger.
Yes, if most of us compare our lifestyles to that of the 1%, we'll feel inadequate. Still, I prefer not to look at some lifelong loser and compare myself to "better than that." If I'm doing better than the bottom of the barrel, that's still not doing very well.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:02 AM
 
1,579 posts, read 2,198,274 times
Reputation: 2746
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
Really, until probably the late 1980s or early 1990s, many state governments were regularly hiring college grads with liberal arts degrees for various administrative positions like program managers or coordinators. When I started in IT, a lot of managers in data processing didn't have any kind of computer background at all but were the liaisons between users and the nerdy techy types who wrote computer programs.

This is just more ol' Freemkt's continual whiney excuse making.
This. My ex and a few of his colleagues started out with liberal arts degrees working in the defense/aviation industry as the go between engineering groups. Actually after college my ex first worked as a restaurant manager for a year until he found an opening at a large private defense firm. After several years of hard work his salary is well over six figures. As for his family background, his father was a drunk and two brothers in and out of jail. He did it all on his own with debt that we slowly paid off over the years. Went for his MBA part time that his company paid for while working full time. It sounds like Feemkt has other issues going on.
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Old 04-24-2015, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
Reputation: 27573
Quote:
Originally Posted by rigizug View Post
This. My ex and a few of his colleagues started out with liberal arts degrees working in the defense/aviation industry as the go between engineering groups. Actually after college my ex first worked as a restaurant manager for a year until he found an opening at a large private defense firm. After several years of hard work his salary is well over six figures. As for his family background, his father was a drunk and two brothers in and out of jail. He did it all on his own with debt that we slowly paid off over the years. Went for his MBA part time that his company paid for while working full time. It sounds like Feemkt has other issues going on.
How long ago was this? People with liberal arts degrees are going to struggle to get into IT roles now, unless they have prior experience, and at some point someone had to take the plunge on them for them to be able to get experience.
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