U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-24-2015, 08:44 AM
 
1,579 posts, read 2,206,809 times
Reputation: 2762

Advertisements

Well, this is a retirement forum. My ex graduated in 1984 with his bachelors. He did have an interest in computers and worked a second part-time job for 6 years on the weekends at a retail computer store, selling computers and showing customers how to operate them. He went to college in Arizona and came to Los Angeles after graduation with the full-time job at the restaurant. Didn't know anyone at the time in CA. He just kept applying for jobs with companies in the computer field until he got hired by one a year later.

Last edited by smpliving; 04-24-2015 at 09:02 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-24-2015, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,651 posts, read 17,632,423 times
Reputation: 27754
Quote:
Originally Posted by rigizug View Post
Well, this is a retirement forum. My ex graduated in 1984 with his bachelors. He did have an interest in computers and worked a second part-time job for 6 years on the weekends at a retail computer store, selling computers and showing customers how to operate them. He went to college in Arizona and came to Los Angeles after graduation with the full-time job at the restaurant. Didn't know anyone at the time in CA. He just kept applying for jobs with companies in the computer field until he got hired by one a year later.
That's the thing - current and near current retirees had this level of flexibility and strength in the labor market that's since evaporated.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2015, 09:39 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
12,764 posts, read 7,837,169 times
Reputation: 13083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
That's the thing - current and near current retirees had this level of flexibility and strength in the labor market that's since evaporated.
In this particular case, I don't think it was flexibility and strength of the labor market.

Computing was a new technology. There were 'some' classes; teaching computer languages, etc., but no one could foresee how computer use would virtually explode world-wide. When it did, there were very few people who could understand it.

Young people should keep their eyes out for whatever the latest, relatively unknown tech is and get in on the ground floor. Never know when that 'obscure' knowledge will come in handy!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2015, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,342,827 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
How long ago was this? People with liberal arts degrees are going to struggle to get into IT roles now, unless they have prior experience, and at some point someone had to take the plunge on them for them to be able to get experience.
Freemkt claims to have graduated in the 1970s, so he could have made the transition like I did in the 1980s. I took 4 ( count 'em, 4!) computer courses at one of the local universities while teaching full time. I took a civil service test for a state job as a computer programmer, which I passed. I was hired because I could actually speak in front of a group and I wrote well, skills that were not necessarily plentiful among computer programmers who came out of CS programs but which were needed in IT.

Fox Terrier is absolutely correct. There were few computer science programs in the 1970s and early 1980s, and most of those were preparing computer scientists for academia. Most people who went into commercial/business computing (IT, data processing, etc) were either math majors or people with other degrees who sort of "fell into it". My first supervisor started working for NYS as a clerk out of HS, and showed an aptitude for computers, so they taught her to program in COBOL. I took my first computer course because I read an article in a woman's magazine that included computer programmer as "a good job for women, especially those who like puzzles".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fox Terrier View Post
In this particular case, I don't think it was flexibility and strength of the labor market.

Computing was a new technology. There were 'some' classes; teaching computer languages, etc., but no one could foresee how computer use would virtually explode world-wide. When it did, there were very few people who could understand it.

Young people should keep their eyes out for whatever the latest, relatively unknown tech is and get in on the ground floor. Never know when that 'obscure' knowledge will come in handy!
Exactly. They might also consider expanding their knowledge of new technology via community college (especially credit free short courses) or other night school offerings or use some of the on-line training sites like lynda.com.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2015, 12:33 PM
 
14,267 posts, read 24,025,211 times
Reputation: 20101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
How long ago was this? People with liberal arts degrees are going to struggle to get into IT roles now, unless they have prior experience, and at some point someone had to take the plunge on them for them to be able to get experience.

As a liberal arts graduate, you are better off developing a particular set of skills that are marketable to a wide variety of businesses. More importantly, you must be able to clearly communicate that you have those skills to potential employers.

As for getting experience, there are a lot of opportunities out there. For example, there are a lot of nonprofits looking for some IT assistance and will provide some training to someone who shows ambition. I work at a non-profit where we have several college students working with an experienced volunteer setting up and perfecting an EBay sales strategy. That is the type of things that many employers will give you credit for.

I send high school graduates interested in culinary programs to soup kitchens to give them experience or broader experience in that industry. (It also convinces them that maybe a career in the culinary arts in not what they are watching in FoodTV.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2015, 02:14 PM
 
Location: in the miseries
3,302 posts, read 3,585,481 times
Reputation: 3810
If I have a choice, I pick rich
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,627 posts, read 9,701,047 times
Reputation: 11017
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
the saying , those who want to succeed will find a way , the rest will find an excuse has never been more truer than in freemkt's case
What I have never understood is some people's seemingly total lack of desire/ambition/want to get ahead. Just because someone is a waitress, hotel clerk, retail or convenience store worker doesn't mean they can't move up. I never aspired to stay where I was at when I started a job. I aimed for management, etc.. I don't understand people who don't do that. They'd rather just sit where they're at and complain I guess. And throw excuses out there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 11:39 PM
 
10,819 posts, read 8,079,355 times
Reputation: 17034
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZDesertBrat View Post
What I have never understood is some people's seemingly total lack of desire/ambition/want to get ahead. Just because someone is a waitress, hotel clerk, retail or convenience store worker doesn't mean they can't move up.
This was arguably true for our generation but it's a whole nother thing to say it's true for today's generation. It has nothing to do with desire or lack of ambition. There's no guarantee or reason to think they can ever "move ahead". There's a genuine lack of security, much less opportunity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 03:17 AM
 
71,831 posts, read 71,919,037 times
Reputation: 49380
job security -yes , that goes for all of us. but opportunity is still a personal and location thing just as it always was.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,342,827 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by biscuitmom View Post
This was arguably true for our generation but it's a whole nother thing to say it's true for today's generation. It has nothing to do with desire or lack of ambition. There's no guarantee or reason to think they can ever "move ahead". There's a genuine lack of security, much less opportunity.
That's just nonsense.

There has never been all that much "job security" except perhaps for unionized white males working in industry in the period between 1945 and about 1970 or among public sector workers protected by civil service laws, and in most of those jobs, there was no real ability to "move ahead" unless you were bold enough to step out of your niche. Pretty much everybody else was in the same "insecure" position that they are in today.

There's a real lack of opportunity for the uneducated and unskilled today, but that's nothing new either. In the 1800s, people without the ability to read and write and without skills had few options except manual or farm labor. In the 1950s through the 1970s, people without high school educations (and there were a lot of them) suffered from limited opportunities, too. Since the 1980s and 1990s, people without some college or without some in-demand skills have seen restricted opportunities, and that's gotten worse in the 21st century.

In earlier times, many people simply didn't have the opportunity to gain the skills they needed, usually because of poverty. Now, too many people who face a lack of opportunity brought it on themselves by refusing to accept the rules of the modern economy, which is that good paying jobs for barely literate, unskilled workers have largely disappeared as those jobs have been automated. You need to have a degree or a marketable skill more than ever, and if you don't, you need to get off your butt and acquire one or the other.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top