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Old 04-28-2015, 10:20 PM
 
Location: SoCal
6,066 posts, read 9,529,219 times
Reputation: 5800

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Y'all are now sounding like a pack of middle schoolers who are picking on someone who's different.

I'm not saying I agree or disagree with your opinions. I'm calling you all on your behavior.

Grow up some, please.
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Old 04-29-2015, 12:46 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,057,675 times
Reputation: 8970
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringwise View Post
I'll repeat: unless you were in a coma, it's all on you. Did you not know that your tags expired? Was your car up on blocks? Did you not receive mail at all when you were in the hospital? Did the person who owned the property turn you in?

I'm thinking there's much more to the story here......

Yes, I knew my tags were expired. WTF was I supposed to do about it from my hospital room? I had no money and couldn't get out of the hospital. Car was not on blocks, was operable with temporarily nobody to operate it. Nobody turned me in, as far as I am aware. (The homeowner next door would not have turned me in.) This was in a rental neighborhood where code police patrolled 24/7. During the day they looked for the laundry list of code violations, at night they looked for overnight parking violations.

The person who owned the property came to the property once a year, for the annual government rental inspection. (We mailed rent checks to the owner, and there were no maintenance issues other than outdoor stairs a few years earlier.) My rent was paid up for the month I went into the hospital, then my boss paid the landlord for the additional months and kept him up to speed. (I then gave my inventory to my boss to sell to a dealer, so he probably came out about $500 ahead.)

Last edited by freemkt; 04-29-2015 at 12:55 AM..
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:34 PM
 
718 posts, read 603,616 times
Reputation: 1052
Freemkt, I am not familiar with you or your situation, but what is stopping you from turning your situation around now? I am not talking about the past, I mean from this minute on.

You seem to be pretty intelligent and somewhat of a thinker, maybe what's stopping you is not owning that you can change your situation. I can't tell you how to do it, you'll need to figure it out for yourself, but I don't doubt that you can.

Everyday above ground is a good day and a chance to change.
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Old 04-29-2015, 09:20 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,932,349 times
Reputation: 18050
o get back to subject the Op brought up. Sure you can retire poor but for most the lifestyle change is just not agreeable. It really depends on what you are use to and want .To each their own as always.
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Old 04-30-2015, 12:00 AM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,592 posts, read 12,337,977 times
Reputation: 15493
The scenario described in the very first post is quite close to the situation my uncle in New York City has. He was in the food service business, didn't save a lot of money, and now lives on his SS check and also gets food stamps (EBT card).

The BIG difference between Dave my uncle is that my uncle "owns" a very valuable apartment in lower Manhattan near City Hall that originally belonged to his older brother, who passed away 30 years ago. By "own" I mean it is a very complicated housing scheme called Mitchell-Lama which has to do with the city of NY giving developers incentives to build high rise rental apartments in which the tenant puts up a deposit, rents over a number of years, but gains equity in the property eventually and can cash out when the building goes private. When my uncle chooses to sell the apartment 1/3 of the selling price goes to the developer.

My uncle claims his 1 bedroom apartment (which is on a high floor, has a terrace, and sweeping views of the midtown Manhattan skyline) is worth $500,000 on the open market. I confess it aggravates me that his modestly sized 1 bedroom 1 bath apartment is worth as much as my 6 bedroom 3 bath 3 story historic brick Victorian house with high ceilings, stained glass windows, 3 fireplaces, etc. Sheesh! You know what they say: LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION.

Living in New York City, my uncle takes advantage of free museum passes, very low cost tickets to plays and musicals (like 1/10 the actual price), free breakfasts, half price public transportation, etc. which are offered to seniors in that city.

Here in Philly, seniors ride public transportation absolutely free. It is paid for by the state lottery. If a senior wants to take the train outside Philadelphia County, the cost is greatly reduced. For example a train trip to Trenton, NJ, about 50 miles from my house, would cost $3 each way.

Last edited by Clark Park; 04-30-2015 at 12:08 AM..
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Old 04-30-2015, 06:46 AM
 
4,481 posts, read 4,743,078 times
Reputation: 9940
Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
Y'all are now sounding like a pack of middle schoolers who are picking on someone who's different.

I'm not saying I agree or disagree with your opinions. I'm calling you all on your behavior.

Grow up some, please.

Yes, amazing isn't it, that it just goes on and on and on.
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Old 04-30-2015, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,329,858 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kay Effzee View Post
Freemkt, I am not familiar with you or your situation, but what is stopping you from turning your situation around now? I am not talking about the past, I mean from this minute on.

You seem to be pretty intelligent and somewhat of a thinker, maybe what's stopping you is not owning that you can change your situation. I can't tell you how to do it, you'll need to figure it out for yourself, but I don't doubt that you can.

Everyday above ground is a good day and a chance to change.
Since Freemkt hasn't yet figured out how to get a job that pays more than minimum wage, despite claiming to have graduated from college in the 1970s, don't hold your breath on him turning his life around at this point.
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Old 04-30-2015, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,581 posts, read 17,567,761 times
Reputation: 27662
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
The scenario described in the very first post is quite close to the situation my uncle in New York City has. He was in the food service business, didn't save a lot of money, and now lives on his SS check and also gets food stamps (EBT card).

The BIG difference between Dave my uncle is that my uncle "owns" a very valuable apartment in lower Manhattan near City Hall that originally belonged to his older brother, who passed away 30 years ago. By "own" I mean it is a very complicated housing scheme called Mitchell-Lama which has to do with the city of NY giving developers incentives to build high rise rental apartments in which the tenant puts up a deposit, rents over a number of years, but gains equity in the property eventually and can cash out when the building goes private. When my uncle chooses to sell the apartment 1/3 of the selling price goes to the developer.

My uncle claims his 1 bedroom apartment (which is on a high floor, has a terrace, and sweeping views of the midtown Manhattan skyline) is worth $500,000 on the open market. I confess it aggravates me that his modestly sized 1 bedroom 1 bath apartment is worth as much as my 6 bedroom 3 bath 3 story historic brick Victorian house with high ceilings, stained glass windows, 3 fireplaces, etc. Sheesh! You know what they say: LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION.

Living in New York City, my uncle takes advantage of free museum passes, very low cost tickets to plays and musicals (like 1/10 the actual price), free breakfasts, half price public transportation, etc. which are offered to seniors in that city.

Here in Philly, seniors ride public transportation absolutely free. It is paid for by the state lottery. If a senior wants to take the train outside Philadelphia County, the cost is greatly reduced. For example a train trip to Trenton, NJ, about 50 miles from my house, would cost $3 each way.
The fact that he has this apartment and this much equity means he's wealthier than he appears to be. He is far from poor and can probably live fairly frugally.
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Old 05-01-2015, 02:24 PM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,592 posts, read 12,337,977 times
Reputation: 15493
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
The fact that he has this apartment and this much equity means he's wealthier than he appears to be. He is far from poor and can probably live fairly frugally.
Oh, he is living frugally because his SS check is only about $750 a month. He needs his EBT card. On the other hand, he lives a very comfortable lifestyle by going to free lectures, free film screenings, free breakfasts and free lunches, low cost theater tickets, street festivals, free ferry rides, etc. His philosophy is to be as active as possible for an 81 year old who had to have his bladder removed a few years ago. He does miss dining out in really nice restaurants and taking cruises; but every couple of months I go to NYC and treat him to a fine meal.

BTW, I joke that I, too, am "house rich but cash poor." Officer Clark does not make a great salary and it seems the bills never go away. But when I decide to retire in about 5 or 6 years the house will nearly be paid off.
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Old 05-01-2015, 03:21 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
7,629 posts, read 14,379,886 times
Reputation: 18706
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Sorry but I think government has no right to force minimum wage workers to save.
If that is your opinion, I hope you will understand when that SAME government you feel has no right to make you prepare to support yourself REFUSES to do it for you when you are without....the old saying is "waste not, want not".
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