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Old 07-24-2015, 10:50 AM
 
8,871 posts, read 5,145,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
At ages 20-30, I was a mother of two, wife, full time office worker, housekeeper, cook, etc.

Was I really supposed to be thinking of retirement then? At that age, it looked like a very long time away. Of course, I also thought I'd be married forever, too. LOL

My ex must have done some thinking about it, tho. Hid money from me and let me think we didn't have a lot. I felt a ton of pressure back in those days.
I was thinking of retirement back then, but I was more focused on the mountain of consumer debt that I learned existed after saying "I do". About 12k. It doesn't sound like a huge amount now, but at the time, for our income, it was overwhelming.

I started saving for retirement at age 31, and for several years, it wasn't much at all, $20 per paycheck. It does add up over time.

I don't expect to well-off in retirement, but I do expect to be modestly comfortable. I will still need to budget carefully. I have lived that way most of my life though, so that's fine. You really can enjoy quite a bit on a modest income if you plan carefully and choose the splurges/luxuries/indulgences which really matter to you and forego the rest.

I enjoy reading about how others manage on their modest means, because if I can get my living expenses low enough, I can pull the trigger on retirement much sooner than FRA.
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Old 11-28-2015, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,890 posts, read 25,343,932 times
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Someone else posted about this same issue and someone quoted this thread. So I will update it.

'Dave' did get his apartment. A great 1 br, almost brand new, about 800sf. Completely adequate for a single person. It's in a great area of town and it's well maintained. Has a community center, pool, gym, and it's right on the bus line. It's better neighborhood than where I live. He is doing great. Vegas is so much cheaper than NYC, he is better off retired here than he was working full time there.
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Old 11-29-2015, 01:23 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,890 posts, read 25,343,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
If Dave applies for Section 8, provided it's actually open and taking applicants, his wait will be at least 5 or more years.

If he applies for low income housing, he just has to wait until someone else dies or moves out. It could be a couple months to a couple years. When I applied for housing where I'm at, I was told it would take at least a year, however, I got a room in just three months. Otherwise, if Dave doesn't find housing right away, he can continue living with his relatives or live like the rest of us do, in our vehicles or on the streets until something becomes available.
Actually it only took 6 months. Part of that time was trying to figure out where to apply. He ended up here. Ovation Property Management And this is really what it looks like too!
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Old 11-29-2015, 02:53 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,265 posts, read 6,356,923 times
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I'm only reading up to half this thread. I don't know if I have the stamina to go through with the whole thread. Maybe I get there eventually but I want to chime in and said freemkt gave me some good LOL moments. I think he missed his calling, should have been a comedian.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 11-29-2015 at 03:09 PM..
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Old 11-29-2015, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,614 posts, read 17,606,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Someone else posted about this same issue and someone quoted this thread. So I will update it.

'Dave' did get his apartment. A great 1 br, almost brand new, about 800sf. Completely adequate for a single person. It's in a great area of town and it's well maintained. Has a community center, pool, gym, and it's right on the bus line. It's better neighborhood than where I live. He is doing great. Vegas is so much cheaper than NYC, he is better off retired here than he was working full time there.
A person can live reasonably well on relatively small amounts of income in many parts of the country. This is a cute condo is a well-maintained complex in the most affluent town in Indiana, and only over $100k.

11750 Glenbrook Court #205, Carmel, IN For Sale | Trulia.com
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Old 11-29-2015, 07:35 PM
 
635 posts, read 405,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
you have to wonder then why so many then abuse the system and stay on all these programs if they really are not deserving of them and can work.

seems to me if all these things they get left them so bad off they would not wan't to go through what you say if they have that choice. yet many scam the system , don't attempt to work and are quite content.
If you were to look at the numbers and statistics [and Mathjak, I am fairly certain that you do...extensively] I can see how it would APPEAR that many more are abusing the system by the fact that there is a significantly higher percentage of individuals receiving assistance than a few decades back. Starting with my own story, and some of my peers, I would like to explain how those figures might lead to deceptive conclusions.


When I first started working, minimum age was somewhere around $1.30 an hour. I lived in a crappy little apartment,[ which I LOVED] and my rent, utilities, and healthcare came to about $75 a month. I worked in the food industry and most jobs there included free meals [ rarely the case now] I lost a lot of jobs because "Vicky, I have never met anyone who TRIES as hard as you do, but it is just not working out." Financially, this did not cause me problems because I made enough money on minimum wage that I was able to save enough money to last between jobs. It was EASIER to get by back then for ANYONE on minimum wage. Also, despite the fact that I was not considered intelligent enough to work those menial jobs, most of them were much less complex than now.


I am also Autistic. I was not diagnosed Autistic as a child. Most Autistic people were not diagnosed back then. A HUGE amount of us were institutionalized though, being considered "retarded," "insane," or both. They are rarely being institutionalized now . Many of the people on assistance are homeless. Among adults, there are estimates that between 30 to 35% of them are Autistic[ or some other developmental disability.[ if you throw in our veterans, we are talking a combined % of WAY over 50% of this nations homelessness.


When I got married the first time, it was during a period of time that most women did not work outside the home. Most women were not "gold-diggers' but they did want a man who worked hard to support his family, even if it was as a ditch digger.


I AM a feminist, though what I am about to say will sound non-feminist. There are so many receiving assistance who are mentally ill. I am constantly hearing people berated for receiving assistance because of extreme anxiety, depression and similar mental disorders that are often trivialized. Yes, it is true that a higher % of Americans are claiming that they are not capable of working because of extremes in these illnesses than in the past. One reason for this though, is that these disorders are often greatly intensified by the stress of complete overwhelmnent. Most guys back then went to work, made enough money even at low level jobs to provide for their family, came home, and relaxed. Women tend to have most of the same responsibilities that they had in the past, except now [ and many men as well] they are expected to also bring in good money [ not some cute little side job] look better, have a house that looks better, overschedule their children [ lest they are accused of negligence] "balance their lives" with enrichment programs, etc. These overflowing responsibilities and societal expectations, are literally "driving people crazy." [ and yes, I am aware that the word crazy is not a psychiatric term]


Throw in other hurdles that were not in existence a few decades ago [ loss of union power, outsourcing, minimum wage not keeping up with inflation,etc] and It makes sense that many good, hardworking people are needing help. So, really, why not just help them?
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Old 11-29-2015, 07:46 PM
 
2,742 posts, read 728,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
A person can live reasonably well on relatively small amounts of income in many parts of the country. This is a cute condo is a well-maintained complex in the most affluent town in Indiana, and only over $100k.

11750 Glenbrook Court #205, Carmel, IN For Sale | Trulia.com
Nicely illustrated, SC. I lived in a similar condo in Georgia for 20 years. We did feel compelled to move because we lived on the top floor and the condo below us became a rental. The owner rented to people who didn't work and had parties at 3 a.m. and domestic violence that we could hear, as well as loud music. Had the renters been more considerate (one time when we called the police, they said if we didn't like it we should move to a single family house!) we'd still be there. It's very possible to be happy in a small, unpretentious place.
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Old 11-30-2015, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,614 posts, read 17,606,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post
Nicely illustrated, SC. I lived in a similar condo in Georgia for 20 years. We did feel compelled to move because we lived on the top floor and the condo below us became a rental. The owner rented to people who didn't work and had parties at 3 a.m. and domestic violence that we could hear, as well as loud music. Had the renters been more considerate (one time when we called the police, they said if we didn't like it we should move to a single family house!) we'd still be there. It's very possible to be happy in a small, unpretentious place.
As people age, stairs and environmental hazards are important. If one was retired, there are towns within an hour of Indianapolis that have sound (though a bit dated) condos for under $50k. It could be a relatively easy retirement, even for someone of limited means.
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Old 11-30-2015, 10:27 PM
 
1,734 posts, read 1,951,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
A person can live reasonably well on relatively small amounts of income in many parts of the country. This is a cute condo is a well-maintained complex in the most affluent town in Indiana, and only over $100k.

11750 Glenbrook Court #205, Carmel, IN For Sale | Trulia.com
Wow! Is that EVER a cute condo! Thanks for sharing!


I'd love to live in a place like that, now that I've gotten over my ill-conceived "back to the land" pretenses. However, I'd be isolating myself away from kidz - none of whom will have the time or means to hop on a plane to come see me even as frequently as we see one another now.


The coast to coast hurdle is the biggest one - the others are sustainable. My Mom moved to FL in her 50s once she hung it up. Because I was working full time with two small children (and one large one, in the case of my first husband) I rarely saw her after she moved. I am NOT signing up for that.
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Old 12-01-2015, 01:08 PM
 
6,325 posts, read 5,069,672 times
Reputation: 12850
Quote:
Originally Posted by vicky3vicky View Post


I AM a feminist, though what I am about to say will sound non-feminist. There are so many receiving assistance who are mentally ill. I am constantly hearing people berated for receiving assistance because of extreme anxiety, depression and similar mental disorders that are often trivialized.


It makes sense that many good, hardworking people are needing help. So, really, why not just help them?
Vicky3 - You know I see this first hand - the undiagnosed disorders. I have three older sisters that I know suffer from extreme anxiety but have never been treated for it or even think they have it. They just go on, but I wonder how much more or what more they could have accomplished if they knew they had something that was just not "right".


Not that they are struggling financially - that I know of - just the things they do and how they see things.


Afraid of so many things. Never being able to change due to some fear. Wanting to do things, but unless someone drives them - they don't go. They do drive locally. One has passed on the anxiety to daughter and grand-daughter, but they don't call it that.
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