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Old 04-18-2015, 06:23 AM
 
72,088 posts, read 72,094,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
Absolutely! There seem to be a lot of people on this forum who have never had it hard at all and have never actually seen poverty. They talk like living on $500 a month with subsidized rent and Medicaid is somehow living in the lap of luxury.

It's just more demonizing of the poor.

you have to wonder then why so many then abuse the system and stay on all these programs if they really are not deserving of them and can work.

seems to me if all these things they get left them so bad off they would not wan't to go through what you say if they have that choice. yet many scam the system , don't attempt to work and are quite content.
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Old 04-18-2015, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,746 posts, read 4,230,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by momofvegasgirls View Post
Yellowsnow, I can tell you this, because I live in Henderson. My Mother moved here from Florida 18 months ago. She go into a brand new senior apartment NOT because any of the social services departments helped her (there is a big waitlist, section 8 is probably not taking any waitlist names for the next decade, either) but because I was nosy and saw the Tempo Apartment building being built (Off Boulder Hwy on Russell) and called the building company to ask what was being built. After a process that required a down payments, which I had to pay, we rented a brand new 1br/1bth sight unseen.

We applied her for SNAP, praying that would help her get over the hump of having ZERO retirement saving and only disability to live on (about $1,100/mo.) SNAP offered up a grand total of $15.00 per month. Nope, I didn't leave off any zeros or misplace a decimal point.....

In Florida, she got $200 per month. Welcome to Las Vegas.
It's not Las Vegas. It comes down to deductions for housing costs (mortgage/rent and utilities) and/or excessive medical expenses. I would bet she had more of these expenses while living in FL.

Many seniors are limited to $16/month in SNAP benefits.
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Old 04-18-2015, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,746 posts, read 4,230,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I was also very poor when I was going to college, but it wasn't so bad for the following reasons:

1. I knew it was a temporary situation, i.e., I knew that obtaining a college degree would allow me to find a decent job. (That was still true when I graduated in 1965).

2. I wasn't alone; there were lots of students working their way through college back then (1962-1965).

3. A rather intense focus on studying didn't leave much room for regretting being poor, i.e., my mental energies were on the goal of graduating.

4. Poor is relative, and although I had almost no discretionary money, I did not go hungry and I had a roof over my head (a bare-bones college dorm not even air-conditioned - I doubt if such a thing even exists now). So maybe some would argue that I wasn't really poor.

I think I did it in the right order in any case - poor from 18 to 21, but able to live in reasonable comfort, though not lavishly, at 71.
I just picked my jaw up off the floor.
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Old 04-18-2015, 07:03 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,935 posts, read 2,892,754 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
it isn't my job nor am i smart enough to propose anything . just stating the facts.
Actually you and I both state opinions, just differing ones. It is a fact that a large part of the population has displayed a lack of skill in retirement planning, or didn't place enough importance on saving, or truly didn't make enough money or just had bad luck. Where we differ is that I would like these people to still be able to retire, just not as well as those who prepared and didn't have anything happen to derail their plan.
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Old 04-18-2015, 07:10 AM
 
72,088 posts, read 72,094,203 times
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well good luck figuring it out for them . not my problem . my concern is making sure i can retire and that i am not part of the problem myself . my charity contributions are my extent of dealing with their issues .

our retirement system consists of the YOYO plan. you are on your own with the back stop of social security adding something in to the pot.

it is up to you to have a plan even if it means moving in with family ,roommates , etc. if you want to stop working it is up to you to find a way.

right or wrong those are the cards we are dealt and have to play them .

Last edited by mathjak107; 04-18-2015 at 07:28 AM..
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Old 04-18-2015, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,785,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
I just picked my jaw up off the floor.
Why is that? I described a common scenario for my age group - nothing unusual or jaw-dropping about it at all.
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Old 04-18-2015, 08:12 AM
 
15,229 posts, read 31,237,926 times
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As usual, there are viewpoints veering in both directions. Mine is somewhere in the middle. While I hate the outright "leeches", I am grateful there is a safety net in this country for people who truly need. My sister is in her 60s, on disability due to having MS and some other issues. Although most of her life she truly wanted to work, she had a hard time getting/keeping a job due to mental/emotional and physical issues.

She lives in Wisconsin, gets maybe $1,200 per month SSI. She rents a regular apartment, no senior or subsidized housing and the rent and utilities take half her income. She does get a sort of "meals-on-wheels" meal once per day, and a small amount of food stamps. She also can get food from a food pantry occasionally. She can no longer drive, but there is a senior/disabled car service that can take her where she needs to go with advance scheduling a a minimal charge.

Bottom line, she is OK. She uses every $, and when emergencies come up it can be hard, but I am glad she is at least basically taken care of. Wisconsin is a very good state when it comes to things like this, and I am grateful. I myself live in Florida with my husband, and while we won't be rich, he at least will have a pension when he retires from his government job, and we do own our home which we can sell if we need to.

Last edited by gypsychic; 04-18-2015 at 08:24 AM..
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Old 04-18-2015, 08:31 AM
 
1,981 posts, read 2,737,574 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
that is their issue to figure out . retirement is where you reach a level where you can have your money work for you.

if they don't achieve that requirement then retirement is not an option until they can or qualify for aid.

retirement in this country is not a right it is something you are rewarded with. .

No, it's not just a personal issue to be figured out. It is a societal problem to be solved. And the solution starts in our earliest years.

Denmark doesn't have a retirement problem (and it's not the only First World country that doesn't have this problem). It's citizens retire at a certain age (sorry, don't remember what is it), Denmark has socialized medicine for all (including retirees), and the amount of money given to retirees each month by the government is more than enough to live decently on.

In Denmark, also, you can also go to school, up through a doctorate (as long as your grades qualify you) for free. Those who don't qualify learn a good trade.

I'm not a socialist (altho' I'm getting there) nor a communist; but there is something wrong with this country when the man next door, in his 50s, who lives on public assistance, can afford alcohol and a smart phone -- oh, I forgot to mention that this man spent almost 10 years in prison for A&B -- and there is an old lady who comes around with a shopping cart and goes through the neighborhood dumpsters, picking out aluminum cans.
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Old 04-18-2015, 08:56 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,138,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
you have to wonder then why so many then abuse the system and stay on all these programs if they really are not deserving of them and can work.

seems to me if all these things they get left them so bad off they would not wan't to go through what you say if they have that choice. yet many scam the system , don't attempt to work and are quite content.

I have a general theory about this

People with fulfilling work/career will seek to return to work and exit an assistance program (e.g. unemployment) as soon as possible.

People with unfulfilling work/job will seek to avoid returning to work as long as possible, and will tend to milk assistance programs as long as they can.

If my theory is correct, it should be easy to predict at program entry the prospects for an individual to exit the program timely, and perhaps to adjust policy.
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Old 04-18-2015, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,125 posts, read 8,182,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
I'm not a socialist (altho' I'm getting there) nor a communist; but there is something wrong with this country when the man next door, in his 50s, who lives on public assistance, can afford alcohol and a smart phone -- oh, I forgot to mention that this man spent almost 10 years in prison for A&B -- and there is an old lady who comes around with a shopping cart and goes through the neighborhood dumpsters, picking out aluminum cans.
This is something I point out often, and people just look at me as if I have 3 heads or something.

Do an online search for Depression-era photographs of bread lines, soup lines. Notice that all the people in those lines are MEN. What happened to the women, the children? Truth is, they had to rely on church charity, and many of them slept outdoors all night. Many of them became ill, and died.

Women and children are the "hidden poor", the people that everybody assumes are being taken care of by men. Usually, they are not. They are the ones bravely trying to look "normal" at school, at work, in public. More $$$ are spent on helping men, while the women and kids run around trying to make ends meet in whatever manner possible. Often, they succeed, while their men lie around drunk all day and all night.
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