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Old 04-19-2015, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,872 posts, read 13,554,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CSRSJim View Post
1) ... I didn't think about the temporary need for a one-story, such as an injury or surgery recovery. Thanks to those that posted that idea.
Nobody likes to think about either of those things, but life-changing events happen when we least expect them. I've never had bursitis in my life, yet one day I woke up with what turned out to be a nasty case of it in my right hip. I'm really glad I'm in a one story house ... but now I even wish it was smaller!

When the doctor said to me, "You're going to need a walker," all I could think was "I already have a walker, but my mother uses it 24/7. Now I have to find a place to park another one?!" In that respect, I don't wish my house were smaller. We're running out of room for orthopedic equipment.
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Old 04-19-2015, 02:47 PM
 
1,831 posts, read 2,137,902 times
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I would consider a bedroom/full bath on the main floor essential because you will at some time have that anyway, ether because you plan ahead or because you did a hasty makeshift conversion due to injury or illness. You should also consider the ease of stretcher access, plan poorly and spend time and money on repairs after an illness.
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Old 04-19-2015, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,740,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mortpes View Post
I would consider a bedroom/full bath on the main floor essential because you will at some time have that anyway, ether because you plan ahead or because you did a hasty makeshift conversion due to injury or illness. ........
Well, no, that is so obviously not the case. Many people die before they reach that point - die in their sleep, etc. Heart attacks and strokes can drop us in our tracks without warning.

Now what would be interesting to know is what percentage of people who reach, say, age 70, end up unable to negotiate stairs at some time before their death. You are claiming it's 100% - at least that's what you just wrote - and that's what I am disputing.
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Old 04-19-2015, 06:11 PM
 
Location: Northern VA
512 posts, read 632,640 times
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I'm only 50 now but my knees and back are already in bad shape. The ortho doc already told me I'll need both knees replaced down the road. We thought we built our retirement home 5 years ago but both mine and my wife's health have gone downhill faster than we expected.

Now we're looking at building another house with everything on the main floor. The community is marketed as "age in place" rather than 55+. The difference is that it doesn't exclude people younger than 55 but it offers amenities for the older and health challenged individuals. Along with all the outside maintenance being taken care if, the house plans include standard things like wider hallways and doors for possible wheel chair needs and options like zero threshold showers.

I've been healthy and active my entire life, but reality dictates that I need to plan for limited mobility in the not too distant future.
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Old 04-19-2015, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Grove City, Ohio
10,134 posts, read 12,387,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bkk1057 View Post
We are a 50+ couple headed toward retirement in the next 8 years or so. My wife is concerned that our current home does not have a bedroom/ bathroom in the main floor. I don't see this as a problem for the next 15 to 20 years (perhaps because of a severe lack of imagination) and after that who knows. My questions to the esteemed forum are as follows:
  1. Will a bedroom/ bath in the main be a main consideration in choosing your retirement residence?
  2. If so at what age do you think that climbing up or down the stairs 2-3 times a day becomes a chore or worse? I understand this will be dependent on the individual. I guess my question pertains to a person of average health.
I would like to downsize to a townhome and I don't see many of these in our area with bath/bed in the main. In the area where I live bedroom/bath in the main is hard to find even in the detached homes.

Curious to see what everyone thinks.

Thanks.
Toying with the idea for now we've been sort of looking and for us laundry facilities, main bathroom, master bedroom with full bath all on the first floor is an absolute must.

No basement whatsoever. I will not have either of us having to negotiate stairs when we're 85.

There is one we both really liked, has everything on the first floor exactly like we want but there's a very large bedroom with full bath upstairs in a loft. This bedroom is HUGE taking up the entire second floor and for now it would serve as a second bedroom for company and when company isn't around it can be her hobby room and my "office". She'll get 80% of the space and I'll have a desk in the corner. Sounds fair to me.

Come to think of it I will no longer have a "man cave" but a "man corner".
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Old 04-19-2015, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Florida
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You don't get advance notice of when disability will strike. When it does happen you will not be able to face moving. Listen to your wife, get a one story dwelling.
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Old 04-19-2015, 09:14 PM
 
10,817 posts, read 8,065,019 times
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We've lived in a 3-story house since ca 1993. Our master bedroom is on the 3rd level. It's a dream layout and not a problem so far at ages 66 and 64.
Should one of us suffer something like say a broken ankle or leg, we have a plan in place as to how we'll handle it.
I've known several seniors who lived in their 2-story homes, MBR upstairs, well into their 80s.
Eventually we'll sell but not because of the multi-levels, rather because we'll be tired of the maintenance that goes along with a house, regardless of where the MBR is.
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Old 04-19-2015, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,587 posts, read 17,574,904 times
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I live in a second floor apartment. I am 28, but do not want to be hauling anything up or down the stairs again, nor do I want to be scaling stairs hauling laundry, food, etc, like I did in my parents' home. It's best if you can get a one level ranch, perhaps with a basement for optional and infrequent storage access.
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Old 04-20-2015, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,351 posts, read 7,829,685 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetana3 View Post
Thought we would never need it and then fell and damaged my leg in my 50s. Could not get up the stairs to bed. Thankfully we had a bath on the first floor so I slept on the sofa until I could crawl up the stairs.

Then husband tore up his knee in exercise class. Again, thankful for the first floor bathroom. He was 63.

A friend is having knee replacement surgery and she is about 65. They have a bathroom on the first floor so they are going to push forward installation of a Murphy bed.

Anyone can have an accident or illness that makes stairs difficult or impossible. Better to be prepared.
While I agree that it is wise to make plans, it is impossible to plan for every eventuality so we do our best. Many of us are not in a position to build a new home to specifications or to relocate to a single floor-plan layout. We do what we have always done; when change comes, we change the Game Plan.

Life is like a pair of shoes - there's no one-size-fits-all.
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Old 04-20-2015, 09:52 AM
 
950 posts, read 714,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Well, no, that is so obviously not the case. Many people die before they reach that point - die in their sleep, etc. Heart attacks and strokes can drop us in our tracks without warning.

Now what would be interesting to know is what percentage of people who reach, say, age 70, end up unable to negotiate stairs at some time before their death. You are claiming it's 100% - at least that's what you just wrote - and that's what I am disputing.

I would disagree.

I am in great health ( going on 70) and have recently had a hip replacement ( turned out great)

Amazing how many of my friends/relatives have had either hip replacement, kneed replacement .....or both.

It seems most people who had any kind of a physical job ends up with some replacement in their late 60's.
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