U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-04-2018, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,244 posts, read 12,495,497 times
Reputation: 19379

Advertisements

We've done a couple. My in-laws were tasteful antique collectors from the 1940s on. We hired an agent to do the estate sale, and after her fees we cleared $50k just on the contents of the house, after we took everything we wanted and gave away some stuff to family friends. In addition to the bucks, her father brought back antiques and art from France after WWII.

My mom didn't want to dump stuff on her heirs, so held multiple yard sales about 10 years before she died. We did a yard sale estate sale and cleared about $13k in 2 days. It was a lot of work, even though the house was pretty spare.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-04-2018, 12:21 PM
 
1,641 posts, read 563,626 times
Reputation: 3099
I've moved four times (not counting the move from my parents house to house #1) and did a garage sale twice and a tag sale twice. Both by me/us, not hiring anyone. The tag sales included furniture but the garage sales didn't (except for small occasional tables, etc, that are easily moved.)

My feeling is that I don't want to lose (by paying a fee) even more money than I have to on whatever I'm selling. People generally know how much they're willing to spend on an item, which is always pathetically little compared to its original cost. Doesn't matter whether it's an estate company or the homeowner who is setting the price.

Whatever didn't sell went into the garage and I called Vietnam Veterans to come pick it all up, then took a tax deduction for a charitable contribution the following April.

I don't plan to move again after this, so the whole tag sale/estate sale thing will one day be my son's problem, not mine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2018, 02:28 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,907 posts, read 1,585,473 times
Reputation: 7941
Mom is 92 (& still relatively lively) but she is in a house that is crammed with mid-market stuff from all those years ago & she doesn't like to throw things away. (She regularly takes out old batteries & put them back in the drawer with the new ones, etc...)

Thinking on the inevitable I was considering yard sales, but an estate sale would be the way to go if it were possible. I wonder that some may not do it anymore, or charge an exorbitant fee, for middle class houses full of old department store furniture & prints of sunsets & flowers. There's just no buyers for most of the stuff, even my mother's treasured Waterford Crystal collection is now a buyers market I think, are there any folks with loose $$$ that are interested in traditional styled crystal anymore? I've never heard anyone under 66yo express the slightest interest in it. It's a shrinking market when all this similarly dated stuff get dumped but few buyers are interested.

Solid wood mid-century modern furniture... sure. Early-american style dark brown wood furniture... nope.
I'm sure this will happen to all of our "fashionable" possessions too when the time comes for our kin to liquidate our estates too & piles of Pottery Barn -esque stuff gets trundled out . A glut of now out of fashion merch, I wonder if estate sales/liquidators would even bother now, worth their effort for small return?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2018, 03:09 PM
 
Location: northern New England
2,444 posts, read 1,062,526 times
Reputation: 9537
I don't know if this was mentioned before, but a somewhat common tactic of "estate sale" people is to overprice the items, then when they don't sell, they'll offer to "take them off your hands" for a lowball amount. Never hire someone to do an estate sale if they also have an antique store.
__________________
Moderator posts will always be Red and can only be discussed via Direct Message.
C-D Home page, TOS (Terms of Service), How to Search, FAQ's, Posting Guide
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2018, 04:56 PM
 
1,641 posts, read 563,626 times
Reputation: 3099
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hefe View Post
I wonder that some may not do it anymore, or charge an exorbitant fee, for middle class houses full of old department store furniture & prints of sunsets & flowers. There's just no buyers for most of the stuff
My DIL's parents had to settle a relative's estate and it was 3 floors full of just what you described. Most of the furniture was from the late 1940s and early 1950s, and tons of small stuff, plastic dishes, old pots, musty books. Mostly the exact same Woolworths stuff that I grew up with in my parents' house, LOL. Knicknacks that probably cost 25 or 50 cents during the fifties and sixties.

Once in a great while, on a whim, I might stop into an antique store (or what passes for them nowadays) and inevitably after walking up and down all the aisles and vendor sections I think "This is at least 90% junk; do they really think anyone will buy this stuff?" I have a feeling most of it probably came from scenarios just like @VTsnowbird is describing.

That said, about 15 years ago I would regularly visit a particular antique store about a half hour away. The owner would go on buying trips to Europe a few times a year, so the stuff they had was not the same old same old (literally!) that you normally see. It was mostly furniture but also some art, glassware, antique light fixtures, etc. I bought an oil painting there that I absolutely love, plus a very small antique side table that has a beautiful pink veined marble top. Both from the late 1800s. Sadly the store closed in 2010 and all the others seem to be either wildly overpriced designers-resource places or multi-vendor ones that sell mostly "chaff."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2018, 05:11 PM
 
6,878 posts, read 7,276,074 times
Reputation: 9786
I had one. Hired a company to sort, price, stage, advertise and promote the sale.
Overall, I had a positive experience.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2018, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Location: Happy Place
3,689 posts, read 1,867,595 times
Reputation: 11306
Should I outlive my husband, I would certainly have an estate sale - all his saws and garage junk, big furniture, etc.

I would just remove items I wanted to keep, enough for a one bedroom apartment and a few wall prints, nick nacks, etc, linens, my clothes.

The rest would be sold. I've been to estate sales where even the pantry items, can goods, etc., were sold. Underwear, clothing, bathroom toiletries, etc. All would be sold.

Not interested so much in how much money I would receive, but that it would all be gone asap....

I would put the house up for sale, move to extended hotel, rent a place to live. End of story.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2018, 11:01 AM
 
1,040 posts, read 484,865 times
Reputation: 1435
we are going through this now.Given my mom doesn't have a ton of stuff and nothing worth that much I am just selling through craigslist and it's actually been pretty decent as we've sold a few items
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2018, 03:13 PM
 
189 posts, read 68,948 times
Reputation: 485
Quote:
Originally Posted by VTsnowbird View Post
I don't know if this was mentioned before, but a somewhat common tactic of "estate sale" people is to overprice the items, then when they don't sell, they'll offer to "take them off your hands" for a lowball amount. Never hire someone to do an estate sale if they also have an antique store.
We had an estate sale when my mom moved to assisted living. The company we hired seemed very professional, had been in business for a while, had a website, and lots of glowing customer reviews. The deal was that he would run everything and take a large %. Leftover items were to be donated, and I'd receive a tax letter.

It was over a weekend and he was supposed to leave the unsold items in the house until Tuesday so I could take anything I still wanted out of the house. On Monday, my husband called me at work to let me know he had driven by the house and they were emptying everything out.
When I rushed over there, I saw that many of the "good" items, still left, had been priced so high that only an idiot would have purchased them.
It turned out that the "charity" that got the leftover items was some sort of a children's fund I had never heard of, that had a charity shop run BY HIS WIFE!
I managed to take some of the items at that point to keep. But, I have no idea how much the guy stole before I got there. It took several weeks of my calling to get a check and a tax letter from him. He did not provide a detailed account of what had been sold, and the descriptions on the tax letter were very generic.

To make me a bigger idiot, he offered to take some of the overpriced items and try to sell them at his next estate sale and I let him. I saw my items at that sale, but then he cut off contact and I had to sue him. I won a judgement from the court, but he declared bankruptcy and I never saw the items or any money.

Do not agree to a sale unless you get an itemized accounting of what was sold and for how much. Make sure you are there, even though they tell you not to be.

Another friend of mine caught her estate sale person ripping out the landscaping from in front of her dad's house as it had been sold and he thought no one would care if he took a few plants.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2018, 04:15 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,202 posts, read 1,342,982 times
Reputation: 6333
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschrief View Post
Should I outlive my husband, I would certainly have an estate sale - all his saws and garage junk, big furniture, etc.

I would just remove items I wanted to keep, enough for a one bedroom apartment and a few wall prints, nick nacks, etc, linens, my clothes.

The rest would be sold. I've been to estate sales where even the pantry items, can goods, etc., were sold. Underwear, clothing, bathroom toiletries, etc. All would be sold.

Not interested so much in how much money I would receive, but that it would all be gone asap....

I would put the house up for sale, move to extended hotel, rent a place to live. End of story.
This. Except that I am single. I would do it when ready to go to an Assisted Living facility.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top