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Old 04-29-2015, 07:48 PM
 
1,188 posts, read 1,122,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burkmere View Post
I get such a kick out of some of the stuff that's posted here. I guess the problem is that there are some partial truths and you have to keep everything in context. Like the poster above who said you can eat on two dollars a day and it's very cheap to live in Costa Rica.

He mentioned $300 a month for an apartment. You can find many apartments in United States for $300 a month if your goal is just to get by for two years. Probably nicer than the ones you will find in Costa Rica. You just won't find them in a nice suburban areas. I mean you can find them in nice, small, safe, friendly towns in the Midwest of probably 10,000 and under if you look. Yes they may not be super nice, but they will be clean and you would be around friendly people. I mean you were only talking two years, right?

If you're trying to get by on two dollars a day to eat in Costa Rica you will be eating rice and beans and absolutely nothing else. In fact you might have to cut one of those out if you want any liquid at all.
Well... that is what I was challenging. Have you been to any small, midwestern towns recently? I have, because I am from one, and my sister and about a dozen aunts and uncles still live in one. There aren't really any places I know of where you can rent anything for $300/m. It's more like $800/m these days, for an apartment that sucks. It certainly isn't going to be any place with nice weather or near an ocean, like you can find in CR and Mexico. Food costs in small town midwest are surprisingly expensive, and of course you have to AC your home in the summer, and heat it all winter, which is also expensive.

I mean, if these small midwestern places were true retirement bargains they would be filled with retirees. But mostly the retired people there are just poor people who couldn't afford to get out. MANY are on supplemental forms of senior welfare. I believe there must be some place like you mention, but based on my experience, I'm a bit skeptical without any names of towns and links to inexpensive rentals.
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Old 04-29-2015, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,869 posts, read 14,377,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seasick View Post
I think many are bitter because there is no pension for them, no matter how hard they work or how little they work for, etc. Pensions are a thing of the past for most, except select government workers. The lower-level workers now for government are often "contract" workers. Just a way to cheat people. You'll see the U.S. standard of living tank for the elderly who don't have pensions. An IRA or any other retirement plan is a crock compared to a pension.
Yes, I agree with you. My kids don't have pensions! However I don't think of my small pension as a "gravy train" no more than I think of my social security the same way. I earned both.

I consider my retirement a precious gift which I was lucky enough to have been offered, and which I gratefully received. I don't deserve my pension more than anyone else. I am simply lucky to have qualified for it. However, I earned it. I really did.
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Old 04-29-2015, 07:56 PM
 
Location: rain city
2,958 posts, read 11,356,527 times
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No one here is paying attention to the important stuff: visas.

Using your example of the cost of living in Mexico is irrelevant to the fact that Mexico changed their pensioner visa requirements in 2012. Now to qualify for a pension visa in Mexico each applicant must have a verifiable income of $1950 per month, per person. So for a couple that is nearly $4,000 a month. Plus all the other document hoops to be jumped through, etc.

Arguing over a few bucks in costs between here and there is meaningless. To move to a foreign country you have to meet their visa requirements.

Please people, first things first.
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:28 PM
 
1,188 posts, read 1,122,651 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azoria View Post
No one here is paying attention to the important stuff: visas.

Using your example of the cost of living in Mexico is irrelevant to the fact that Mexico changed their pensioner visa requirements in 2012. Now to qualify for a pension visa in Mexico each applicant must have a verifiable income of $1950 per month, per person. So for a couple that is nearly $4,000 a month. Plus all the other document hoops to be jumped through, etc.

Arguing over a few bucks in costs between here and there is meaningless. To move to a foreign country you have to meet their visa requirements.

Please people, first things first.
good point
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Old 04-29-2015, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
21,539 posts, read 44,010,725 times
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Switzerland, last I looked a few years ago, required an annual income of $100k per retired couple, 30% of which automatically was taxed. Net to retirees - $70k/yr. I imagine a number of European countries are similar.

One of our posters lives in Portugal and has done for many years. I believe COLA isn't all that high, weather is lovely, medical facilities adequate and nearby, large expat community. Not sure if $2k/mo. per couple would do it, however.
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Old 04-29-2015, 09:15 PM
 
2,294 posts, read 1,561,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjasse View Post
Well... that is what I was challenging. Have you been to any small, midwestern towns recently? I have, because I am from one, and my sister and about a dozen aunts and uncles still live in one. There aren't really any places I know of where you can rent anything for $300/m. It's more like $800/m these days, for an apartment that sucks. It certainly isn't going to be any place with nice weather or near an ocean, like you can find in CR and Mexico. Food costs in small town midwest are surprisingly expensive, and of course you have to AC your home in the summer, and heat it all winter, which is also expensive.

I mean, if these small midwestern places were true retirement bargains they would be filled with retirees. But mostly the retired people there are just poor people who couldn't afford to get out. MANY are on supplemental forms of senior welfare. I believe there must be some place like you mention, but based on my experience, I'm a bit skeptical without any names of towns and links to inexpensive rentals.
I grew up in a small Midwestern town for 22 years and lived in two more in college and 4 years beyond. There are tens of thousands like this with many in larger places with airports, bus lines, near downtown and shopping in mid sizes cities of 50-100k. There's tons more in smaller towns. The OP isn't asking to live in Manhattan. 24k a year ain't gonna let you rent a 10k a month apt.

https://siouxfalls.craigslist.org/apa/4955782565.html
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Old 04-29-2015, 09:23 PM
 
2,294 posts, read 1,561,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjasse View Post
Well... that is what I was challenging. Have you been to any small, midwestern towns recently? I have, because I am from one, and my sister and about a dozen aunts and uncles still live in one. There aren't really any places I know of where you can rent anything for $300/m. It's more like $800/m these days, for an apartment that sucks. It certainly isn't going to be any place with nice weather or near an ocean, like you can find in CR and Mexico. Food costs in small town midwest are surprisingly expensive, and of course you have to AC your home in the summer, and heat it all winter, which is also expensive.

I mean, if these small midwestern places were true retirement bargains they would be filled with retirees. But mostly the retired people there are just poor people who couldn't afford to get out. MANY are on supplemental forms of senior welfare. I believe there must be some place like you mention, but based on my experience, I'm a bit skeptical without any names of towns and links to inexpensive rentals.
My point is when you factor everything in, unless they want a wild adventure for two years I HIGHLY HIGHLY doubt it would work out very well. Most of the idyllic sounding places in CR or Thailand near a beach with nice ( Thailand is scorching a lot ) weather will get boring and old after a month not knowing the language , dealing with visa issues, spending more than you thought, hating the local food of rice and rice for $2 a day, having trouble figuring out where to go to pay what, etc, not getting good internet connection or TV or streaming shows...

I've covered about 1% of the possible frustrations when all they really want is to live "somewhere" for two years on 2k a month.

At 22 this might sound fun. At 60 and as a couple who have never even been to these places and prob don't have the time or resources or patience to spend a few months in each to try it out, I doubt it. But go for it!!!!
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Old 04-29-2015, 09:30 PM
 
Location: NYC
2,910 posts, read 1,588,036 times
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That's why they need to rent for a few months to see if they assimilate, I think you are probably right in that most don't have a real concept of "culture shock". $400/mo would get you a very nice place in Chiang Mai, if you have an open mind.
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Old 04-29-2015, 09:34 PM
 
2,294 posts, read 1,561,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hefe View Post
That's why they need to rent for a few months to see if they assimilate, I think you are probably right in that most don't have a real concept of "culture shock". $400/mo would get you a very nice place in Chiang Mai, if you have an open mind.
True. If they are open to adventure it can work. I'd test drive it for a few months first.
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Old 04-29-2015, 09:41 PM
 
Location: rain city
2,958 posts, read 11,356,527 times
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I don't have any special knowledge, but I have read in various conversations of late that Thailand too is tightening up their residency visa requirements.

Anybody looking to retire in a foreign country first needs to look at the visa regulations to see what requirements are and whether they qualify.

After that you can argue the cost bread and rent.
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