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Old 05-05-2015, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,969,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heidi60 View Post

Be thankful we are fortunate enough to be here to share our experience.
Yes. I never expected to live till this age, really. It's amazing.
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Old 05-05-2015, 08:07 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,471,910 times
Reputation: 29071
There is much posted on the Retirement Forum about waiting to retire until you reach the optimal Social Security age to do so. I've always felt that for many that's really bad advice. I'll use myself as an example.

I retired at age 62 because I could. The average age of death for men in my family is 71 to include my father, his father and his younger brother and only sibling. Had I waited until 66 to retire that status may well have been limited to five years presupposing that no event hastened my assumption of room, temperature. As it now stands, I'll be 69 in three months. Supposing I follow the familial pattern, at least I will have had at least nine years of retirement to experience. That certainly beats five.

At age 65, three years after retirement, I was stricken with a neurological disorder that left me partially paralyzed. The following year, just six months before that magical FRA I underwent hours of neurosurgery. It helped but I'll never be "right" again. Had I waited to retire until my 66th birthday to retyire I'd have had to do so as work would have been impossible and ultimately, I would have had no "abled body" retirement years whatsoever.

In the end, delaying retirement to reach a certain age, status, financial goal, etc. can end up being nothing more nor less than a crap-shoot. You win some. You lose some. Glad I didn't wait!
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Old 05-05-2015, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,845 posts, read 14,356,798 times
Reputation: 30697
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post

In the end, delaying retirement to reach a certain age, status, financial goal, etc. can end up being nothing more nor less than a crap-shoot. You win some. You lose some. Glad I didn't wait!
That is how I feel about it too. I am so grateful for my retirement.

In retrospect, I wish we had done more traveling when we were healthier. We did some, but not to really exciting places. We did do London on our 40th anniversary, and that was a very nice trip. But, five years later, I dread the long plane trips. I agree with others who recommend treating yourself to some things while you still work.

But I also think that you need to save as much as possible, and invest it wisely, for retirement.

We strove for balance before we retired. It is foolish to go overboard with frugality, or prodigality before retirement. And no matter your age, every single day you are alive is a gift.
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Old 05-05-2015, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,763 posts, read 7,695,901 times
Reputation: 14995
I knew a guy who worked as a maint. manager for years, 6 days a week in a large factory. Retired, bought a condo in Florida. 1 month after retirement, he's sitting out on the patio. His wife goes inside to get him lemonade. She brings him his lemonade and he's gone. His last words were, I wonder what the guys in the shop are doing today?
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Old 05-05-2015, 09:58 PM
Status: "I am Blessed." (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Spurs country. "Go, Spurs, Go!"
3,400 posts, read 3,963,274 times
Reputation: 8776
So many sad stories, y'all have my sympathy if you have been affected by the sudden loss of a loved one, whether family or dear friend.

I heard this story on the news many, many years ago, and it has stayed with me. I don't remember all the specifics but the picture I had has stayed in my mind.

A bus driver, Greyhound, I think, of 30 years, took his wife and son on his farewell drive on the day before or day of his retirement. He was parked on the side/shoulder of the road/freeway (I don't know why) when a truck (semi?) left the road and hit the bus from the rear. He, his wife and son were all killed. IIRC, he had never had an accident in his 30 years of driving the bus.
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Old 05-05-2015, 10:28 PM
 
10,812 posts, read 8,058,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
Maybe it's just me, but it seems useless to worry that you might die before you retire or before you take that special trip. Once you are gone, you certainly don't care.

On the other hand, the survivors are the ones who are missing out on the companionship they could have had for that special time. So really, this post is more about the survivors than the ones who died suddenly. Of course if you are stricken ill or become disabled, that is certainly a tragedy, and it could happen to any of us.
I agree. Someone dying close to their retirement is at worst a horror story for their survivors. For the occasional survivor, it's a blessing. That would be true if someone passed 5 years before or 5 years after retiring, generally speaking, so I don't consider such to be a "retirement horror story". There's the occasional oddball financial misfire that adversely affects surviving financial dependents, but again that can just as easily happen at any age.

I can't think of nor have I seen anything posted here that qualifies as a retirement horror story. When we reach retirement age, we're looking at our own mortality. That doesn't faze me. What does scare me is the idea of living a long time (with or without $$ resources) with a crippled mind or body. But again that's not a retirement thing, it's just an aging thing.
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Old 05-05-2015, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,165 posts, read 8,689,130 times
Reputation: 6166
Smile Never even made it

When I hear stories - for example, about Dave Goldberg (Survey Monkey CEO, husband of Sheryl Sandberg) and while on vacation, he passed away at 47!! Two young children.

So much to live for and no matter how much money they have/had, it just makes you think how things can change in minutes.

Just a definite wake up moment.
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Old 05-06-2015, 01:04 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,043,990 times
Reputation: 8970
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Does a single person in their 70's need to live in a house that is big enough for two or more people? If they are living on the edge, then moving in advance might make sense. Also either of them could consider working.

As much as I oppose in principle single people (or empty nester couples) living in houses built for more occupants (on the ground it is an inefficient use of housing resources when many others are renting single rooms or are overcrowded), I think that staying in their larger home is usually the best and a necessary strategy for those with both limited resources (e.g. SS only) and a mortgage.

Assuming they acquired the mortgage before the bubble, they're not going to find rent today cheaper than their mortgage payment. As long as they are making their mortgage payments, they are increasingly paying down the principal, plus enjoying appreciation in almost all markets today.
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Old 05-06-2015, 01:17 AM
 
71,500 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
There is much posted on the Retirement Forum about waiting to retire until you reach the optimal Social Security age to do so. I've always felt that for many that's really bad advice. I'll use myself as an example.

I retired at age 62 because I could. The average age of death for men in my family is 71 to include my father, his father and his younger brother and only sibling. Had I waited until 66 to retire that status may well have been limited to five years presupposing that no event hastened my assumption of room, temperature. As it now stands, I'll be 69 in three months. Supposing I follow the familial pattern, at least I will have had at least nine years of retirement to experience. That certainly beats five.

At age 65, three years after retirement, I was stricken with a neurological disorder that left me partially paralyzed. The following year, just six months before that magical FRA I underwent hours of neurosurgery. It helped but I'll never be "right" again. Had I waited to retire until my 66th birthday to retyire I'd have had to do so as work would have been impossible and ultimately, I would have had no "abled body" retirement years whatsoever.

In the end, delaying retirement to reach a certain age, status, financial goal, etc. can end up being nothing more nor less than a crap-shoot. You win some. You lose some. Glad I didn't wait!
it is usually monday morning quarter backing with this stuff. when something happens health wise most go thank god i retired earlier rather than later.

but if you frequent retirement forums the number 2 regret for those who turned out healthy is they wish they waited longer to take ss as they could use the money . number 1 was usually do more travel.

my own opinion is there are some cases waiting to file is worth the risk but to make it worthwhile you need to live at least to 90 if you are spending down your own investments waiting.

working and waiting is a different story.

in the Nationwide Financial Retirement Institute survey 38% said they wished they waited to file for ss. while 62% are happy they filed early , 38% not to be is a pretty high number.

Last edited by mathjak107; 05-06-2015 at 02:17 AM..
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Old 05-06-2015, 02:30 AM
 
71,500 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
There is much posted on the Retirement Forum about waiting to retire until you reach the optimal Social Security age to do so. I've always felt that for many that's really bad advice. I'll use myself as an example.

I retired at age 62 because I could. The average age of death for men in my family is 71 to include my father, his father and his younger brother and only sibling. Had I waited until 66 to retire that status may well have been limited to five years presupposing that no event hastened my assumption of room, temperature. As it now stands, I'll be 69 in three months. Supposing I follow the familial pattern, at least I will have had at least nine years of retirement to experience. That certainly beats five.

At age 65, three years after retirement, I was stricken with a neurological disorder that left me partially paralyzed. The following year, just six months before that magical FRA I underwent hours of neurosurgery. It helped but I'll never be "right" again. Had I waited to retire until my 66th birthday to retyire I'd have had to do so as work would have been impossible and ultimately, I would have had no "abled body" retirement years whatsoever.

In the end, delaying retirement to reach a certain age, status, financial goal, etc. can end up being nothing more nor less than a crap-shoot. You win some. You lose some. Glad I didn't wait!
my mom died at 52 and my dad 67 . first cousin just died at 58 , longevity sure didn't run in my family. all cardiac issues

so far at 62 all is well except for some diabetic neuropathy . still running almost 4 miles every other day non stop so all seems to be well but i got my fingers crossed.
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