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Old 05-10-2015, 09:03 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,064 posts, read 9,524,350 times
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This blog might give you some ideas, and links to other possibly useful blogs. These are a younger couple who are living/working full time out of their RV: Technomadia | Adventures in Nomadic Serendipity
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:10 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,546 posts, read 39,924,861 times
Reputation: 23663
Quote:
Originally Posted by greywar View Post
...

Of course the bad side of a larger rv is gas mileage. Truly truly amazingly bad gas mileage. ...
Although I will admit theres some discussion of going smaller for better gas mileage. Tradeoffs on it though.
Look into a skoolie (converted school bus) They get 10+ mpg, as do decent sized diesels. (up to 15... Sprinter class C up to 17)

With a diesel you can be a grease burner (conversion kit and extra 'heated' fuel tanks) , or brew your own. (direct diesel replacement, no engine or vehicle mods required)
Appleseed Processor Kit - Utah Biodiesel Supply

I like the idea of Transition to Teach, I come out of High Tech and many of my fellow exiles now teach STEM.
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Old 05-10-2015, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,886 posts, read 25,311,688 times
Reputation: 26372
Someone suggested you should take an extended vacation and try it before you buy it. Good idea! If you are living in a huge home that used to house 10 people, sell the monster and downsize into an apartment or a much smaller, cheaper home. That alone should save you buckets of money. And time. You don't have to clean and maintain what you don't have.

I like the idea of developing your own software and creating your own income stream. And that's something you can do from anywhere. You can even start working on it now. And you can do it till you drop dead as long as you keep your skills up to date.

Tech worships youth and right now you are close to the end of your mover and shaker years. I too retired relatively young from tech with the idea of just moving on to another job. After all I had experience. Wrong. No one wants to hire an old tech worker and it wasn't all that long before tech moved on and my experience was no longer relevant. That was a hard lesson to learn. Just know before you leave that big buck job this is very real!

$700 per month is not enough money. But there are steps you can start taking now to make retiring very doable in the pretty near future.
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Old 05-10-2015, 03:23 PM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,911 posts, read 2,876,920 times
Reputation: 6291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke Notaras View Post
It's possible to be a W-2 software engineer in your 50's, but it's not common.
Actually, I know of a few. Finding full time employment in your 50s can be harder than getting contract work. It's not all age discrimination, either. When looking for full time developers, we are usually looking for potential in entry level candidates. If we decide to farm out a piece of work, we want experience. "We" being my employer where I am working as a developer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
No one wants to hire an old tech worker and it wasn't all that long before tech moved on and my experience was no longer relevant.
I live in a medium sized city. There are dozens of COBOL/JCL openings. I don't do that kind of work, just an example of how there are still jobs for some time after tech marches on. There are also C/UNIX jobs, VB6 jobs and plenty of SQL, .Net and Java work that aren't cloud based. Yeah, it is easier to find jobs doing web, cloud and tablet/phone development, but there is still plenty of "old" tech out there.

Last edited by ReachTheBeach; 05-10-2015 at 03:32 PM..
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Old 05-10-2015, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,472 posts, read 5,143,862 times
Reputation: 3531
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
i suggest reading bob clyatt's book work less - live more . excellent guide for semi retirement.



Work Less, Live More: The Way to Semi-Retirement: Robert Clyatt: 9781413307054: Amazon.com: Books
Thanks for the recommendation. I picked it up at the library and I am enjoying reading it. I am planning to be semi-retired in 3 years at 55.
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Old 05-10-2015, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,325,793 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarvedTones View Post
Actually, I know of a few. Finding full time employment in your 50s can be harder than getting contract work. It's not all age discrimination, either. When looking for full time developers, we are usually looking for potential in entry level candidates. If we decide to farm out a piece of work, we want experience. "We" being my employer where I am working as a developer.

I live in a medium sized city. There are dozens of COBOL/JCL openings. I don't do that kind of work, just an example of how there are still jobs for some time after tech marches on. There are also C/UNIX jobs, VB6 jobs and plenty of SQL, .Net and Java work that aren't cloud based. Yeah, it is easier to find jobs doing web, cloud and tablet/phone development, but there is still plenty of "old" tech out there.
Agreed with all of the above. I'm an old (65) software developer currently. Recently moved into the brave new world of Groovy and Grails despite having a retirement target date of 2016. The demise of COBOL, predicted back in the 1990s, was a bit premature since the US banking industry operates on the principle of "don't fix what's not broke".
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Old 05-10-2015, 07:07 PM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,911 posts, read 2,876,920 times
Reputation: 6291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
Agreed with all of the above. I'm an old (65) software developer currently. Recently moved into the brave new world of Groovy and Grails despite having a retirement target date of 2016. The demise of COBOL, predicted back in the 1990s, was a bit premature since the US banking industry operates on the principle of "don't fix what's not broke".
And if it is broke, patching is usually a lot quicker and cheaper than a new implementation.

Interestingly enough, I have heard the inside scoop on why Windows is going from 8 to 10 (and it is actually relevant, bear with me). Back when Windows 95 and 98 were out, they had significant internal differences in operation from NT, 2000, XP and the more recent releases. But 95 and 98 were largely the same in how they differed from the others. Anyway, a lot of code (mostly 3rd party products and internal corporate applications) was written that would request the name of the OS as a string of text and then test to see if it began with "Windows 9". If it did, then it ran operations that would only work on 95 or 98. In early testing of what is now Windows 10, it was called Windows 9 and it caused these applications to crash. Thousands of applications, many of which are mission critical, are running code written 20 years ago.

Kudos on learning the new stuff and staying current. I started in the early 80s as a FORTRAN programmer and most of the languages and platforms I have worked on I moved to when needed without formal training. It's just what you do if you want to stay in demand and be appreciated.
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Old 05-11-2015, 07:59 AM
 
761 posts, read 637,648 times
Reputation: 2229
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarvedTones View Post
Actually, I know of a few. Finding full time employment in your 50s can be harder than getting contract work. It's not all age discrimination, either. When looking for full time developers, we are usually looking for potential in entry level candidates. If we decide to farm out a piece of work, we want experience. "We" being my employer where I am working as a developer.

I live in a medium sized city. There are dozens of COBOL/JCL openings. I don't do that kind of work, just an example of how there are still jobs for some time after tech marches on. There are also C/UNIX jobs, VB6 jobs and plenty of SQL, .Net and Java work that aren't cloud based. Yeah, it is easier to find jobs doing web, cloud and tablet/phone development, but there is still plenty of "old" tech out there.
Cobol and JCL?
How about TSO, IMS and DB2?

I found work as a database administrator employing Oracle on an IBM mainframe.
Never even knew that was possible.

All my years of TSO and JCL came in handy.
I had worked with Oracle on most O/S's but never mainframe.
I'll be with my company 5 years come March, 2016.
Started as a contractor and was added full time a few months later.

Sadly, mainframe has fallen out of favor here and we will be moving to Exadata on Oracle configured appliances in the near future.
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Old 05-11-2015, 05:08 PM
 
26,304 posts, read 12,839,724 times
Reputation: 12550
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Someone suggested you should take an extended vacation and try it before you buy it. Good idea! If you are living in a huge home that used to house 10 people, sell the monster and downsize into an apartment or a much smaller, cheaper home. That alone should save you buckets of money. And time. You don't have to clean and maintain what you don't have.

I like the idea of developing your own software and creating your own income stream. And that's something you can do from anywhere. You can even start working on it now. And you can do it till you drop dead as long as you keep your skills up to date.

Tech worships youth and right now you are close to the end of your mover and shaker years. I too retired relatively young from tech with the idea of just moving on to another job. After all I had experience. Wrong. No one wants to hire an old tech worker and it wasn't all that long before tech moved on and my experience was no longer relevant. That was a hard lesson to learn. Just know before you leave that big buck job this is very real!

$700 per month is not enough money. But there are steps you can start taking now to make retiring very doable in the pretty near future.
The 700/month is based upon me not creating a revenue stream. I have some thoughts on increasing that revenue stream even higher. But the 700/mo is whats used to supplement the cash I will enter with as I change my life. I will invest the cash I have after the house sale into some revenue generating ideas (no not nonsense scam based ones....but in all honesty ones that require some work on my part), and any software I create. I think there are some excellent possibilities in being among the first to create content for things like the Hololens that will create some good income. Right now theres not much out there in the way of visualization tools, and other things.
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Old 05-11-2015, 06:14 PM
 
71,511 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49088
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
Thanks for the recommendation. I picked it up at the library and I am enjoying reading it. I am planning to be semi-retired in 3 years at 55.
great. i intend to use his method of withdrawal through retirement. i like the idea of having a dynamic budget that is governed by the real world conditions.
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