U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-19-2015, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,747,361 times
Reputation: 32309

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
..........................
I'm hoping achievements involving other people count for something.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
You are the one who decides what counts. In my opinion helping others ranks pretty high.
I second Jrkliny's motion on this one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-19-2015, 11:03 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,856 posts, read 18,874,270 times
Reputation: 33780
I don't know. I think a lot of the good things that we have done are things that we'll never know how the results turned out. I know I taught a lot of first graders to read and write. I took a special interest in those who had a harder time learning and I did see huge progress by the end of the year. Probably if I had stayed at that same school I might have had kids or parents come back and tell me. But I moved on.

One time I got a family off welfare. I had become friends with the woman and there was no reason why she and her husband weren't working. They really loved their kids so I said to the husband, "What kind of example are you setting for your kids? They don't see their dad getting up and going to work in the morning. It's up to you or else they are going to end up on welfare too. They both got volunteer jobs that turned into real jobs. I moved away so I don't know how their kids turned out but I bet they had a pretty good chance of getting off welfare.

I helped my Viet Nam vet ex husband with all my heart. I got out of bed from surgery to drive him to a VA hospital. They said he had really bad PTSD and would never work again. I got SSDI for him, I went to food pantries for us since I was too sick to work. I helped him work on his military disability pension. He then proceeded to cheat me out of all the money we had earned but I forgive him. It wasn't really him. He has more money than I do but I think I helped him although he will never really be happy.

I took care of my aging parents and helped with my ex's parents. For a while all my friends' parents were dying and I hope I was a source of comfort and of information for knowing what to do. I helped a few of them by appraising the value of their parents' possessions and telling them what to keep and what to throw away.

I've taken care of my little corner of the earth by organic gardening and recycling. There are people I would like to help but I don't know how. One important thing I did was to join focus groups, participate in videos, and advocate for breast cancer surgery in my state and it paid off. No acknowledgement, as usual, but I'm so glad it got done. Three hospitals here now offer it.

So I don't feel like I've done very much. But I'm not dead yet and there is more to accomplish.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.

Last edited by in_newengland; 05-24-2015 at 04:54 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2015, 04:35 AM
 
6,294 posts, read 4,740,348 times
Reputation: 12902
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
.........

So I don't feel like I've done very much. But I'm not dead yet and there is more to accomplish.
I would disagree. Your list of accomplishments deserves a gold star. I hope along the way you have found time to focus on yourself and what makes you happy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2015, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,693 posts, read 33,704,884 times
Reputation: 51924
Quote:
Originally Posted by jghorton View Post
As we get older, I think many of us ask the question/s: "What have I accomplished in my life?"
I keep asking that question to others about a candidate who is running for President. Maybe if she thinks of something it will give the rest of us some ideas.

I recall that at work we used to have to write up our accomplishments every year at evaluation time. Are any of them, any at all, worth putting on your tombstone (er, headstone)? I ask this when people put work ahead of family.

Here lies Joe
He was a hard worker
and always got the XYZ report done on time.

Here lies Mary
You could always count on her to work late
if something had to be done right away.

Here lies Pete
He figured out a way to count
inventory quicker.

Point being, those work accomplishments mean diddley when you reassess your life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2015, 06:42 AM
 
6,294 posts, read 4,740,348 times
Reputation: 12902
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
......

Point being, those work accomplishments mean diddley when you reassess your life.
I think that might depend on what your work involves and what you achieve. I worked in healthcare and feel that I helped make life better for others. I was also always interested in making the workplace enjoyable or at least tolerable for those who worked under me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2015, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,747,361 times
Reputation: 32309
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I keep asking that question to others about a candidate who is running for President. Maybe if she thinks of something it will give the rest of us some ideas.

I recall that at work we used to have to write up our accomplishments every year at evaluation time. Are any of them, any at all, worth putting on your tombstone (er, headstone)? I ask this when people put work ahead of family.

Here lies Joe
He was a hard worker
and always got the XYZ report done on time.

Here lies Mary
You could always count on her to work late
if something had to be done right away.

Here lies Pete
He figured out a way to count
inventory quicker.

Point being, those work accomplishments mean diddley when you reassess your life.
Whether something is worth putting on a tombstone is a poor litmus test for whether that thing is a legitimate source of satisfaction and gratification as we look back and take stock of our lives. Why sneer at work accomplishments? If we went out of the way to do things at work which helped co-workers or helped clients, then that is praise-worthy and to the good. Why would being supportive and helpful to neighbors and family members rate higher than being supportive and helpful to co-workers and clients? It's all good, and it's all most people are going to "accomplish" in life. Most of us are not smart or talented enough to be a research scientist or an opera singer or a test pilot or a designer of space probes or a Nobel Prize winner.

Denigrating work seems to be a ubiquitous theme in the retirement forum, appearing in threads on so many different topics. I had a short full-time career compared to a lot of people - 34 years. During that time I had moonlighting jobs more often than not, some of which continued for a few years after I retired from full-time work at age 61, which I consider quite early. And no, I don't wish I had retired sooner (another common theme) because I retired at the right time, both financially and personally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2015, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,693 posts, read 33,704,884 times
Reputation: 51924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Whether something is worth putting on a tombstone is a poor litmus test for whether that thing is a legitimate source of satisfaction and gratification as we look back and take stock of our lives. Why sneer at work accomplishments? If we went out of the way to do things at work which helped co-workers or helped clients, then that is praise-worthy and to the good. Why would being supportive and helpful to neighbors and family members rate higher than being supportive and helpful to co-workers and clients? It's all good, and it's all most people are going to "accomplish" in life. Most of us are not smart or talented enough to be a research scientist or an opera singer or a test pilot or a designer of space probes or a Nobel Prize winner.

Denigrating work seems to be a ubiquitous theme in the retirement forum, appearing in threads on so many different topics. I had a short full-time career compared to a lot of people - 34 years. During that time I had moonlighting jobs more often than not, some of which continued for a few years after I retired from full-time work at age 61, which I consider quite early. And no, I don't wish I had retired sooner (another common theme) because I retired at the right time, both financially and personally.
I think people want to be appreciated at the end for how good they are as people, that's all. If you are known for some great work achievement, people who care about those things already know. You don't have to tell them about the Oscars.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2015, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,297 posts, read 3,343,271 times
Reputation: 4829
What have I accomplished in life?

Interesting thread and interesting 'points-of-view' contained in the various responses...............................

For those of us that have lived a signifcant number of years in the same "location" prior to our death (and funeral), I would think one "measure" of ones "accomplishments" and "value-to-society-in-general" might be "gauged" by the number of people in attendence at the Funeral.

In other words (using a male as an example):...Was he an "all-around good-guy"; was he always friendly, happy & up-beat; was he generous and helpful to others; was he a good and faithful husband and father; was he a good-listener; was he honest and not hypocritical; was he understanding and compassionate of other's unfortunate status in life.

If the "average" male-of-the-specie would score 100% on the above qualifing questions,.................I'd say he accomplished one hellava lot in his life time.

Being in my 84th year, I may "look-at-this accomplished-in-life-thing" from a slightly different perspective than some of you......................I know what I have accomplished
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2015, 02:44 AM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,978 posts, read 3,464,691 times
Reputation: 10513
I think the one comment someone told me ( we worked in the same building, not the same department). was, "You'll neveer know how much you helped me". It was the difference. Between 20 & 30 and the advice I gave her must have worked.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-25-2015, 06:28 AM
 
6,294 posts, read 4,740,348 times
Reputation: 12902
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montana Griz View Post
What have I accomplished in life?

Interesting thread and interesting 'points-of-view' contained in the various responses...............................

For those of us that have lived a signifcant number of years in the same "location" prior to our death (and funeral), I would think one "measure" of ones "accomplishments" and "value-to-society-in-general" might be "gauged" by the number of people in attendence at the Funeral.

In other words (using a male as an example):...Was he an "all-around good-guy"; was he always friendly, happy & up-beat; was he generous and helpful to others; was he a good and faithful husband and father; was he a good-listener; was he honest and not hypocritical; was he understanding and compassionate of other's unfortunate status in life.

If the "average" male-of-the-specie would score 100% on the above qualifing questions,.................I'd say he accomplished one hellava lot in his life time.

Being in my 84th year, I may "look-at-this accomplished-in-life-thing" from a slightly different perspective than some of you......................I know what I have accomplished
I find your post interesting as it illustrates how different we all can be in deciding what qualifies as an accomplishment.

You have listed quite a few measures that are not important to me:
number of people at my funeral
reputation for being friendly, happy, upbeat
good listener

Bottomline: I do not consider popularity as a measure of my accomplishments.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top