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Old 05-14-2015, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,856 posts, read 14,364,134 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
^^^

There are lots of folks, younger and retired, who maintain impressive disciplined schedules, whether it's getting up at 5 a.m. every day to go to the gym, doing chores on certain days of the week, or whatever. I've always been the type of person who does something when the mood strikes me, which makes me more of an emotion-based person than a rational one in many respects. I admire people with self-discipline, unless it seriously derails creativity and occasional impulse.
Ah yes, the discipline thing. For some having a strict routine is a must; they don't feel secure without one. For others of us, the strict discipline is stifling.

So she does yard work on Saturday? Wow, she's missing out on some activities that take place only on weekends. But really, to each her own.

The major discipline we have imposed is to get up at 7:00. I set that time for us when we retired, because I was concerned that we would turn into slugs! And now the trip to the gym three times a week. And a trip to Portland to pick up a grand after school once almost every week. Also we don't turn the TV on until evening, unless DH decides to watch the home baseball team during the day. We attend church on Sunday, and I have joined a committee that meets once a week, and a small group that meets for study. That's all for us. I admit that I fit housework around our commitments.
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Old 05-15-2015, 11:24 AM
 
6,394 posts, read 3,352,334 times
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The one positive habit I can really appreciate that I cultivated after retirement was to start putting more quality time and attention toward my important friendships. I'm not a highly social person, pretty introverted, but the girlfriends I do have are very dear to me and have stuck by me through thick and thin. I often was too busy or stressed over the years to put in the time needed to keep the flames of friendship going strong.

First, I got rid of any toxic relationships.
And since having more time in retirement, I've made it a habit to give my friendships more quality time, special attention, and extra thoughtfulness.
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Old 05-15-2015, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,971,705 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainrose View Post
The one positive habit I can really appreciate that I cultivated after retirement was to start putting more quality time and attention toward my important friendships. I'm not a highly social person, pretty introverted, but the girlfriends I do have are very dear to me and have stuck by me through thick and thin. I often was too busy or stressed over the years to put in the time needed to keep the flames of friendship going strong.

First, I got rid of any toxic relationships.
And since having more time in retirement, I've made it a habit to give my friendships more quality time, special attention, and extra thoughtfulness.
Nice post, something I will think a lot about.
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Old 05-16-2015, 08:51 AM
 
Location: in the miseries
3,302 posts, read 3,578,775 times
Reputation: 3810
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainrose View Post
The one positive habit I can really appreciate that I cultivated after retirement was to start putting more quality time and attention toward my important friendships. I'm not a highly social person, pretty introverted, but the girlfriends I do have are very dear to me and have stuck by me through thick and thin. I often was too busy or stressed over the years to put in the time needed to keep the flames of friendship going strong.

First, I got rid of any toxic relationships.
And since having more time in retirement, I've made it a habit to give my friendships more quality time, special attention, and extra thoughtfulness.
Good for you!

I aim to do that, too.

sometimes friendships are lost from lack of attention.
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Old 05-16-2015, 12:58 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,475,774 times
Reputation: 29071
Default Are we too old to develop positive new habits?

Probably not, but we may not wish to do so!
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Old 05-16-2015, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Orlando
1,984 posts, read 2,634,653 times
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I'm currently trying to form this new habit: Every day that I'm at home (i.e., no big appointments elsewhere) I try to do three things:

1. Clean something in the house. Today I vacuumed the tile floors, steam-cleaned the kitchen floor, and scrubbed the toilets and bathroom sinks. That was a lot of cleaning for one day. I may just run the dishwasher tomorrow, and call it a day as far as cleaning is concerned.

2. Get some exercise. I recently joined a gym that's 5 minutes from my house. However, today's exercise was vacuuming and scrubbing (see above). I'll probably get back to the gym tomorrow after a volunteer gig that I have in the early afternoon. I really get an endorphin high pounding on the treadmill with classic rock & roll blasting in my ears from my iPod.

3. Spend some time studying French. I take a one-night-a-week class at the Alliance Francaise, and there's usually some homework, or I do a chapter in a workbook, or listen to a French podcast. I've been studying French on and off as a hobby for about 50 years -- I may never get beyond the intermediate level, but I still enjoy the process.

But some days -- especially days when some really good DVD's arrive from Netflix -- I have to admit I don't accomplish any of the three. Eh, no big deal.
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,971,705 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
I'm currently trying to form this new habit: Every day that I'm at home (i.e., no big appointments elsewhere) I try to do three things:

1. Clean something in the house. Today I vacuumed the tile floors, steam-cleaned the kitchen floor, and scrubbed the toilets and bathroom sinks. That was a lot of cleaning for one day. I may just run the dishwasher tomorrow, and call it a day as far as cleaning is concerned.

2. Get some exercise. I recently joined a gym that's 5 minutes from my house. However, today's exercise was vacuuming and scrubbing (see above). I'll probably get back to the gym tomorrow after a volunteer gig that I have in the early afternoon. I really get an endorphin high pounding on the treadmill with classic rock & roll blasting in my ears from my iPod.

3. Spend some time studying French. I take a one-night-a-week class at the Alliance Francaise, and there's usually some homework, or I do a chapter in a workbook, or listen to a French podcast. I've been studying French on and off as a hobby for about 50 years -- I may never get beyond the intermediate level, but I still enjoy the process.

But some days -- especially days when some really good DVD's arrive from Netflix -- I have to admit I don't accomplish any of the three. Eh, no big deal.
A nice habit of daily 3's!

I parallel this, except my no. 3 is spend some time on artistic pursuits. Not yet completely retired (I freelance and teach a class) I sometimes don't complete all 3 every day, but it's a worthwhile goal.
I also put some almost-daily attention on dog grooming and indoor and outdoor plants.
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,971,705 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curmudgeon View Post
Probably not, but we may not wish to do so!
Curmudgeons are rather stubborn and stuck in their ways, but if they do something like develop a new positive habit they'd never admit it. Can't betray the persona, lol.
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Old 05-17-2015, 08:25 AM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,475,774 times
Reputation: 29071
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
Curmudgeons are rather stubborn and stuck in their ways, but if they do something like develop a new positive habit they'd never admit it. Can't betray the persona, lol.
By-and-large, curmudgeons are misunderstood and unappreciated. ::::sigh:::: The banes of our existence!
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