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Old 05-14-2015, 02:03 PM
 
Location: SoCal
6,069 posts, read 9,531,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
Gosh we had to fashion our own pens from turkey feathers and make our own ink. Each of us had a candle at our desk. And...


... and walked ten miles through the snow to school. Uphill. Both ways.
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Old 05-14-2015, 02:23 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,435 posts, read 1,669,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
One of my worst memories in elementary school was of feeling confined and overdressed in a dress with starchy sleeves, socks and saddle shoes on those oppressively hot first few weeks of school. Just so miserable.
Ah yes, wearing new outfits which were suited for autumnal weather and not the summer weather at the start of school.

I loved those big crank out windows in the classrooms and the sound of nearby neighbors with their lawn mowers and the smell of freshly cut grass.

One of my early fears was dropping the pint size glass milk bottles off my tray in the cafeteria when returning it to be cleaned. Every day someone dropped one, what a noise!

I used pencils in school until the fifth grade and it was some cartridge pens but more ball points by then.
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Old 05-14-2015, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post

I used pencils in school until the fifth grade and it was some cartridge pens but more ball points by then.
I am hearing from various sources that cursive handwriting is no longer being taught in the schools, in favor of test preparations. Students can't even READ anything handwritten. These kids will be growing up not knowing how to sign their name. Everyone will be known by X.
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Old 05-14-2015, 04:05 PM
 
Location: NC
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The fun part is that those who know cursive can send 'secret' messages to one another!
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Old 05-14-2015, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Orlando
1,990 posts, read 2,637,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
I am hearing from various sources that cursive handwriting is no longer being taught in the schools, in favor of test preparations. Students can't even READ anything handwritten. These kids will be growing up not knowing how to sign their name. Everyone will be known by X.
At first I thought that the phasing out of cursive writing instruction was yet another sign that this country is going to h3ll.

Then I realized that even though we all had to struggle through years of cursive writing instruction, very few of us have decent handwriting as a result of it.

True story: When my sister was in 5th grade (this was in the early 60's), she got a lower grade in cursive writing for one grading period, because she had failed to keep both feet flat on the floor during a writing test.
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Old 05-14-2015, 06:57 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,581 posts, read 10,926,696 times
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While engaged in this thread I began to think about the penmanship contests of yesteryear. I searched for penmanship contests assuming the information would be historical, but I found that penmanship contests are common today. In fact, penmanship is hot.

I was torn between posting on this thread or on the thread about old people learning new good habits. What could be better for physical-mental coordination? How could we better distance ourselves from what the bard called ''unwashed artificers'' and Bulwer-Lytton and Thackeray called more inclusively ''The Great Unwashed'' in their writing.

This would be a real challenge for many of us; I'm a good example as I have both a bone spur and significant muscle loss in my right hand. However, this is worthy of investigation; reprints of early works are available.

I just bought this set.

http://www.amazon.com/Spencerian-Pen...rds=penmanship

-There are books available for young children as well. Any here who wish to do something good for grandchildren would be well-advised to buy some. Children will prefer this to contact with other children. Tell them that games and dirt are for their inferiors. This is for the best children.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platt_Rogers_Spencer

http://www.amazon.com/Handwriting-Cu...rds=penmanship

This looks like an ecellent overview. I ordered the Kindle sample so I'll read it tonight and, I hope, find the book worthy of purchase.

http://www.amazon.com/Script-Scribbl...t+and+scribble

Be sure to tell everyone you know who is trustworthy that in these days of government intrusion into communications that cursive may be the only private means of communication.

Remember the old days when my writing that last sentence would have been inconceivable.
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Old 05-14-2015, 07:10 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
The fun part is that those who know cursive can send 'secret' messages to one another!

Kind of like Pig Latin? Ecret-say anguage-lay?
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Old 05-15-2015, 06:42 AM
 
Location: NC
6,555 posts, read 7,981,951 times
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jean_ji, you made me belly laugh!
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Old 05-15-2015, 08:14 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,069 posts, read 9,531,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
Kind of like Pig Latin? Ecret-say anguage-lay?
I should relearn my steno shorthand. Except I'm not sure I could find anyone else who could read my secret messages.
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Old 05-15-2015, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,668,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Today when people think of a stick pen they are likely thinking of a cheap ballpoint, a throwaway. However, in my second grade class it had a far more ominous meaning because it referred to the dip pen, the pen that dribbled and dripped seemingly everywhere. I can imagine what an ordeal it must have been for southpaws as the inkwell was in the upper righthand corner of the desk.

Do you remember it? Did you, too, long for the day when you would be allowed to take your fountain pen to school? Fountain pens could drip when poorly handled by little tykes. However, my mother not only allowed it for my homework, she positively insisted that I use it and not the dreaded stick pen.

Ballpoints? The ballpoints of the day skipped; our teachers neither permitted them in class nor allowed them for homework.

During the last month or so of the school year we were finally allowed to bring our fountain pens. We did, however, manage to spill some ink, usually at the end of a writing assignment. Then we had the singular joy of rewriting the assigned work.

I suppose that that was my first incident of nostalgia because I often wished that we still used the pencils of our youth.
I write left-handed and remember stick pens. It wasn't too bad. What was a pain in the neck were desks where the writing side was on the right and you had to cross your left arm across your chest to write on it. It looked like you were leaning over to look at your neighbor's paper when you were taking a test.

Back to the pens. In one school I attended, we had fountain pens. We weren't allowed to have ink bottles in the ink wells in our desks. The teachers didn't trust us. We had a communal inks wells on the windowsills and had to get up to fill our pens in them. In another school, we had stick pens and were allowed to use the ink wells. The stick pens came first, then the fountain pens.

We were not allowed to use ball points because they were believed to be too "uncontrollable" and would therefore contribute to the illegibility appearance of our handwriting. I still don't like them but I do like the gel pens available today which are like fountain pens. They even smear like fountain pens which is something every left handed writer has to deal with.

We used "Mrs Kittle's Penmenship" book for our handwriting lessons. To me it was like learning how to draw. I think it taught me fine motor skills that would have otherwise escaped me.
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