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Old 05-15-2015, 03:16 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,571 posts, read 10,920,803 times
Reputation: 19200

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
I write left-handed and remember stick pens. It wasn't too bad. What was a pain in the neck were desks where the writing side was on the right and you had to cross your left arm across your chest to write on it. It looked like you were leaning over to look at your neighbor's paper when you were taking a test.
We had desks like these. They came in a variety of sizes from tiny to adult. For anyone not familiar with them, each unit contained the seat of one and the desk of another behind. They were screwed to runners. The desks I used had a compartment under the top for books, papers, etc.

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Old 05-15-2015, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,661,739 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
We had desks like these. They came in a variety of sizes from tiny to adult. For anyone not familiar with them, each unit contained the seat of one and the desk of another behind. They were screwed to runners. The desks I used had a compartment under the top for books, papers, etc.
That's my desk in my 1950's Chicago classroom. I think most of us must have used those then. Mine had a compartment too. This one doesn't appear to have that.
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Old 05-15-2015, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,520 posts, read 20,900,729 times
Reputation: 13855
Quote:
Originally Posted by jean_ji View Post
Kind of like Pig Latin? Ecret-say anguage-lay?
Jean jean jopean! bananabanna bopean! fee fie fopean! Jean!
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Old 05-15-2015, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,973,893 times
Reputation: 15649
When the word 'nostalgia' was coined in the 18th century, it was used to describe a pathology—not so much a sense of lost time, but a severe homesickness.
—Nicole Krauss

Nostalgia is a file that removes the rough edges from the good old days.
—Doug Larson

Really, each era has its own false nostalgia. We all put a picket fence up around something. For my generation it was the '50s, and for other generations it will be something else. Change is scary for everyone, as is complexity, contradiction, and an uncertain future.
—Gary Ross

I'm not into nostalgia. I only look back to find lessons.
—Ian Schrager

I'm terribly nostalgic, but I'm with the Elizabethans who thought nostalgia was a disease. It's a dangerous place to be because you can get caught up in it.
—Mark Gatiss

I do not long for the world as it was when I was a child. I do not long for the person I was in that world. I do not want to be the person I am now in that world then. None of the forms nostalgia can take fits. I found childhood boring. I was glad it was over.
—Alan Bennett

People seem to get nostalgic about a lot of things they weren't so crazy about the first time around.
—Author Unknown

Nothing is more responsible for the good old days than a bad memory.
—Franklin Pierce Adams

Things ain't what they used to be and probably never was.
—Will Rogers

It's never safe to be nostalgic about something until you're absolutely certain there's no chance of its coming back.
—Bill Vaughn

If you're yearning for the good old days, just turn off the air conditioning.
—Griff Niblack
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:09 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,838 posts, read 18,851,047 times
Reputation: 33746
We had desks sort of like that. The chairs were adjustable though and every year the janitor would come around and raise or lower your chair. Some of the desks were hateful--the top didn't open up and you had to fish around inside to find your materials. But the ones that opened were fine. The teacher came around and filled the inkwells and we got our stick pens and made pen cleaners from a piece of felt and a button we sewed on.

What a mess. That's probably why I have terrible writing. If you pressed down too hard with your stick pen, the nib would split and you'd be writing double. That's why I always got Penmanship 3 stamped on my papers while the other kids with the light golden touch got Penmanship 1.

It was a treat when we got older and were allowed to use fountain pens. We girls bought little bottles of pretty colored ink. I liked writing in turquoise.
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:11 PM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,571 posts, read 10,920,803 times
Reputation: 19200
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
When the word 'nostalgia' was coined in the 18th century, it was used to describe a pathology—not so much a sense of lost time, but a severe homesickness.
—Nicole Krauss

Nostalgia is a file that removes the rough edges from the good old days.
—Doug Larson

Really, each era has its own false nostalgia. We all put a picket fence up around something. For my generation it was the '50s, and for other generations it will be something else. Change is scary for everyone, as is complexity, contradiction, and an uncertain future.
—Gary Ross

I'm not into nostalgia. I only look back to find lessons.
—Ian Schrager

I'm terribly nostalgic, but I'm with the Elizabethans who thought nostalgia was a disease. It's a dangerous place to be because you can get caught up in it.
—Mark Gatiss

I do not long for the world as it was when I was a child. I do not long for the person I was in that world. I do not want to be the person I am now in that world then. None of the forms nostalgia can take fits. I found childhood boring. I was glad it was over.
—Alan Bennett

People seem to get nostalgic about a lot of things they weren't so crazy about the first time around.
—Author Unknown

Nothing is more responsible for the good old days than a bad memory.
—Franklin Pierce Adams

Things ain't what they used to be and probably never was.
—Will Rogers

It's never safe to be nostalgic about something until you're absolutely certain there's no chance of its coming back.
—Bill Vaughn

If you're yearning for the good old days, just turn off the air conditioning.
—Griff Niblack
I'll take 1950 over today, especially all of the things that Democrats hate about that era. That's what I miss the most. That's what made it so much better than today.
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Old 05-15-2015, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,661,739 times
Reputation: 35449
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
We had desks sort of like that. The chairs were adjustable though and every year the janitor would come around and raise or lower your chair. Some of the desks were hateful--the top didn't open up and you had to fish around inside to find your materials. But the ones that opened were fine. The teacher came around and filled the inkwells and we got our stick pens and made pen cleaners from a piece of felt and a button we sewed on.

What a mess. That's probably why I have terrible writing. If you pressed down too hard with your stick pen, the nib would split and you'd be writing double. That's why I always got Penmanship 3 stamped on my papers while the other kids with the light golden touch got Penmanship 1.

It was a treat when we got older and were allowed to use fountain pens. We girls bought little bottles of pretty colored ink. I liked writing in turquoise.
Oh yes. Turquoise was my favorite. I remember the label on the bottle. "Peacock Blue."

Didn't those stick pens have removable points? I think I remember them having those.
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Old 05-15-2015, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,248 posts, read 12,499,482 times
Reputation: 19393
I dumped cursive as soon as my teachers would let me, and dumped handwriting as much as possible as soon as I learned to type, on an old Royal manual. I never had the patience for handwriting. Typing is so much faster.

My roommate in college used a Rapidograph, which was the draftsman equivalent of a fountain pen. Instead of a nib it had a tiny tube, and you had to hold it vertically as you wrote. I still have the old hand crank pencil sharpener that I bought when I started college, but my old draftsman tools have vanished somewhere. I love modern mechanical pencils, with their small lead and comfortable grip. I still have my old Keuffel & Esser log-log duplex decitrig slide rule. Once upon a time I even knew how to use it.

What else has disappeared? We used to pledge allegiance to "one nation indivisible," a sentiment I think we would do well to return to. Six ounce coke bottles for a nickel, with a one cent deposit. They steam cleaned returns and used them again. Trash pickers at the dump. All the kids working in the fields in the summer. Paper boys (and girls). Cake walks.
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Old 05-15-2015, 08:57 PM
 
13,319 posts, read 25,558,234 times
Reputation: 20505
Maybe cursive handwriting will become modern calligraphy- practiced by a select few who are talented.

I type everything. I have a bad right hand from years of speed printing on triple-copy carbon paper for an editing job. If I hand write anything, my hand goes quickly numb. I wish we had type keys instead of fingertips.
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Old 05-15-2015, 09:01 PM
 
6,647 posts, read 2,442,274 times
Reputation: 4621
Someone once told me that people that grew up during the 1940s (even earlier), 1950s on the East Coast have the most beautiful and elegant handwriting. I don't know if that is generally true, but friends that grew up on the East Coast do have a distinctive handwriting - very beautiful.
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