U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-14-2015, 12:49 AM
Status: "Support the Mining Law of 1872" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,583 posts, read 10,930,257 times
Reputation: 19216

Advertisements

Today when people think of a stick pen they are likely thinking of a cheap ballpoint, a throwaway. However, in my second grade class it had a far more ominous meaning because it referred to the dip pen, the pen that dribbled and dripped seemingly everywhere. I can imagine what an ordeal it must have been for southpaws as the inkwell was in the upper righthand corner of the desk.

Do you remember it? Did you, too, long for the day when you would be allowed to take your fountain pen to school? Fountain pens could drip when poorly handled by little tykes. However, my mother not only allowed it for my homework, she positively insisted that I use it and not the dreaded stick pen.

Ballpoints? The ballpoints of the day skipped; our teachers neither permitted them in class nor allowed them for homework.

During the last month or so of the school year we were finally allowed to bring our fountain pens. We did, however, manage to spill some ink, usually at the end of a writing assignment. Then we had the singular joy of rewriting the assigned work.

I suppose that that was my first incident of nostalgia because I often wished that we still used the pencils of our youth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-14-2015, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,357 posts, read 10,346,234 times
Reputation: 28522
I remember that type of pen but being left handed I was glad to see them go. I do remember they came out with ink cartridges for the pens. Not what we think of now as ink cartridges-no computers on the horizon even. These were little plastic tubes of ink that fit in the pen.
Progress!


In later years, I tried learning calligraphy but couldn't figure out how to do it, even with the pen made especially for lefties.

I also remember wooden desks being replaced by metal ones. And the chairs being separate from the desk with those. Was glad for that too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 04:50 AM
 
477 posts, read 399,390 times
Reputation: 1547
We used pencils in the lower grades. By the time we graduated to pens, they had the plastic cartridges of which you speak. But we still had regular fountain pens at home, and I did learn to use them. Some of them had a lever that you used to fill up the reservoir. Fancy fountain pens! India ink! Blotters! 3 penny stamps!

We had the rows of wooden desks bolted to the floor. I didn't mind them. The seats were actually more comfortable than the cheap plastic chairs that went with the "new" desks.

We still had a rag man come around looking for rags for recycling, mostly into high quality paper, until I was around 12 or 13. Back then clothing was still mostly natural fibers - I HATED my wool sweaters, they itched so badly!

Still had paper straws, and real diners, and real milkshakes. They came in glasses - made of real glass - that fit into a metal holder. Drive-ins were new and all the rage. I remember poodle skirts, bobby socks, and oxfords. Didn't LIKE any of that, but I remember them.

There was no AC in schools. I don't think they had it even by the time I graduated high school, except maybe in the new school across town. They did have 10' ceilings and high glass windows made of many many individual panes set into metal frames that cranked open all the way up to the ceiling in sections. There was a special long tool to get to the cranks on the higher sections of window.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Vero Beach, FL
135 posts, read 163,906 times
Reputation: 109
I loved fountain pins, and remember everyone being excited when the cartridges came out for less mess. My favorite was the peacock blue ink you could get. Imagine... this was before the invention of Sharpies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Florida
19,816 posts, read 19,910,927 times
Reputation: 23221
A sweet sour memory of finally getting a highly desired poodle skirt which was shortly ruined because of one of those drippy fountain pens.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 06:29 AM
 
Location: NC
6,562 posts, read 7,986,401 times
Reputation: 13465
I had completely forgotten those ink cartridges! Never had to use the actual fountain pens, except that in college we did need to use them with india ink for some labeling and sketching. We also needed to hand draw all of our graphs for publication, which meant that dreaded pen drip would make us start completely over. On velum paper if you can remember that.

And photography? You had to be an expert at compostion and lighting since there was only one chance to get it right. At least we had film, dark rooms, and vats of chemicals, not 'plates'. Today your 5 yr old can take better pics than many of us could back in the 60's. It does make photography available to everyone, but most of it will be lost to 'the ether' since there are few physical photos produced. Meanwhile 99.999% of it will be lost when old servers and personal computing devices are retired.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 09:12 AM
 
Location: SoCal
6,069 posts, read 9,533,605 times
Reputation: 5815
We were taught by nuns who wore white habits. They banned ballpoint pens, because the ink smeared. We were required to use fountain pens or cartridge pens.

Dad did some graphic work on the side, so he taught us all how to use the 'drippy' pens with India Ink.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Orlando
1,994 posts, read 2,638,622 times
Reputation: 7593
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
Today when people think of a stick pen they are likely thinking of a cheap ballpoint, a throwaway. However, in my second grade class it had a far more ominous meaning because it referred to the dip pen, the pen that dribbled and dripped seemingly everywhere. I can imagine what an ordeal it must have been for southpaws as the inkwell was in the upper righthand corner of the desk.

Do you remember it? Did you, too, long for the day when you would be allowed to take your fountain pen to school? Fountain pens could drip when poorly handled by little tykes. However, my mother not only allowed it for my homework, she positively insisted that I use it and not the dreaded stick pen.

Ballpoints? The ballpoints of the day skipped; our teachers neither permitted them in class nor allowed them for homework.

During the last month or so of the school year we were finally allowed to bring our fountain pens. We did, however, manage to spill some ink, usually at the end of a writing assignment. Then we had the singular joy of rewriting the assigned work.

I suppose that that was my first incident of nostalgia because I often wished that we still used the pencils of our youth.
I remember well the transition from pencil to stick (dip) pen -- we didn't use fountain pens in my school, only the stick pen with the bottle of ink in the little well in the corner of the desk.

What was really scary about using the stick pen was taking spelling tests in ink! No ability to erase mistakes any more. I think it was my fourth grade teacher who permitted us one scratch-out if we felt we had misspelled a word. Multiple scratch-outs and multiple attempts at correction were marked wrong.

And woe unto the student who dipped her pen too far into the bottle of ink, and got ink smeared on her hands as a result!

Ballpoint (not available to us until junior high) was a godsend.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,982,141 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeonGecko View Post
There was no AC in schools.
One of my worst memories in elementary school was of feeling confined and overdressed in a dress with starchy sleeves, socks and saddle shoes on those oppressively hot first few weeks of school. Just so miserable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
8,401 posts, read 9,148,021 times
Reputation: 13037
Gosh we had to fashion our own pens from turkey feathers and make our own ink. Each of us had a candle at our desk. And...


Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top