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Old 05-16-2015, 08:59 PM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
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I bought a Ukulele about a month ago and after I finish my online photography class I'm going to start learning it.

I figure it should be fairly simple (I hope) and maybe if I learn enough I'll advance to a guitar or banjo.
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Old 05-16-2015, 10:13 PM
JRR JRR started this thread
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rakin View Post
I bought a Ukulele about a month ago and after I finish my online photography class I'm going to start learning it.

I figure it should be fairly simple (I hope) and maybe if I learn enough I'll advance to a guitar or banjo.
Let me know how it goes when you start learning the ukulele. That is one instrument that I have on my mind as it looks reasonably easy to learn and looks like fun. And last month we had a blast at a concert by the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain
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Old 05-16-2015, 10:15 PM
JRR JRR started this thread
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Originally Posted by Harpaint View Post
If you like country music, the autoharp is very easy and fun. You can see and listen to several players on youtube, such as Will Smith, Harvey Reid, and JoAnn Smith. You don't have to read music to play. I would suggest getting a good diatonic harp, and definitely not one of those black things they played in elementary school! Those are only for simple strumming and not the kind of playing that is popular now.
Thank you for the autoharp idea. I had not thought of that but it looks like it would be fun and easy. I'm adding it to my list.
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:36 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JRR View Post
Thank you for the autoharp idea. I had not thought of that but it looks like it would be fun and easy. I'm adding it to my list.
you're welcome!
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Old 05-16-2015, 11:45 PM
 
Location: Retired in Malibu/La Quinta/Flagstaff
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I grew up in an Italian family and as it is a tradition, someone has to be able to play the accordian. Guess who was the lucky one? I played religiously until I turned 18 and enlisted in the Army. The accordian sat in a closet for 45 years until I retired last year. Needed some refreshing, but I now find it to be an enjoyable way of passing the time.

About 25 years ago, I went to my internist in Santa Monica for my annual physical. Who was sitting in the waiting room but Lawrence Welk. We got to talking and being an accordianist himself, thought he would enjoy this riddle:

Q: What's the difference between an accordian and an onion?

A: Nobody cries when you cut an accordian in half.

Mr. Welk got the biggest laugh out of that joke.
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Old 05-17-2015, 06:11 AM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
31,986 posts, read 36,613,387 times
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Originally Posted by Patrolman View Post
I grew up in an Italian family and as it is a tradition, someone has to be able to play the accordion.
Ever seen the episode on "How it's Made" on the factory that builds Accordions ? It must have taken a genius to invent such a complicated instrument with all the keys, valves and bellows.

Probably the same guy who invented Bag Pipes.
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Old 05-17-2015, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Dallas
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Learning a new instrument in the later years is a win-win situation. It stimulates brain activity and provides you with the enjoyment of listening to music. Good for you!

I took the clarinet all throughout my school years, then in my 20s took guitar lessons, but never got to where I was really proficient in the guitar. Two young kids and a lot of responsibility left me with little time or energy to practice, and I gave it up. Now, at 60 I am re-learning the guitar.

I do hear that the dulcimer is one of the easiest stringed instruments to play.
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Old 05-17-2015, 09:29 AM
 
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Depending on your age, you'd probably have better luck sticking to instruments that are easier to play and/or practice.

. Wind instruments make quite a racket, and you won't be likely to subject others to your practice sessions...there's a lot of embarrassment involved. OTOH, there are a lot of community bands once you get skills to a certain level.
. Brass instruments (especially trumpet) take quite a bit more athletic ability than woodwind. Saxophone (alto probably) is the easiest to learn to play I think. Decent saxes/flutes/clarinets are pretty expensive.
. Single note instruments (ie. not piano) can be easier.
. Electric guitars, basses, and keyboards can be practiced silently.
. Choose an instrument that's appropriate for music you enjoy
. If you can't practice/play with others, practice/play with play-alongs, failing that, use a metronome.

Knowing nothing about the OP, I'd suggest a $200 Fender bass and a copy of Rocksmith.
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Old 05-17-2015, 09:57 AM
 
Location: alabama.
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one of my great regrets in life is not pursuing a musical career .. i`ve wasted talent . i have a musical ear .. i can pick up most any instrument and in a moment or two can bang out a tune on it ..to me learning piano opens the door to all other instruments .. it gave me perfect pitch and scale that i could easily take to a guitar ` banjo ` flute ` harmonica or any noise maker i could pick up .. never got around to trying a fiddle though ...
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Old 05-17-2015, 12:12 PM
 
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I started piano lessons when I was 35 Years old - practiced 1 - 2 hours daily for 5 years and actually got up to intermediate level. Then, I got married and took on a very demanding job. My piano playing was abandoned. Now in retirement, at age 64, I find I am totally unable to play at all and can't even read music anymore. Makes me wonder if I am brain damaged. I've tried and tried for about 6 months. The debate now is whether to totally give up, sell the baby grand which I've kept tuned and repaired all this time, or to hire a classical piano teacher and try to dig all that buried knowledge out of my brain. Any ideas???
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