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Old 05-25-2015, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Retired in Malibu/La Quinta/Flagstaff
1,324 posts, read 1,328,399 times
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I retired after 40 years as a police officer last year. I miss it more than I thought I would. I have no family and my wife died shortly after we were married 38 years ago. My work made up for it. My coworkers and the public I was paid to protect were my social circle. I did the best I could for as long as I could. But reality set in and at age 63 I realized that law enforcement, especially patrol duty, is a younger person's line of work.
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Old 05-26-2015, 01:33 AM
 
1,734 posts, read 1,949,340 times
Reputation: 3901
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrolman View Post
I retired after 40 years as a police officer last year. I miss it more than I thought I would. I have no family and my wife died shortly after we were married 38 years ago. My work made up for it. My coworkers and the public I was paid to protect were my social circle. I did the best I could for as long as I could. But reality set in and at age 63 I realized that law enforcement, especially patrol duty, is a younger person's line of work.
Patrol, I'm certain that you touched many lives and made a difference in the world. Very sorry to hear of your wife's death. I don't have anything uplifting to say, not that words can help in this situation. Best to you.
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Old 05-26-2015, 05:10 AM
 
761 posts, read 638,294 times
Reputation: 2229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrolman View Post
I retired after 40 years as a police officer last year. I miss it more than I thought I would. I have no family and my wife died shortly after we were married 38 years ago. My work made up for it. My coworkers and the public I was paid to protect were my social circle. I did the best I could for as long as I could. But reality set in and at age 63 I realized that law enforcement, especially patrol duty, is a younger person's line of work.
I'm sure that the people you protected really appreciated it.
Like you, I will be retiring at age 63.
Getting a divorce, so I will face retirement largely on my own, except for a few friends.

I have gotten really involved in my church recently and after retirement, plan to be even more involved.
Since I have no family at all here and just one close friend where I live, I have come to view the congregation as family. Churches don't run themselves and need a lot of committment from members to keep things going.

I would like to get a part time job doing something. Maybe even driving for Uber when I feel like it, volunteer work and a Tai Chi class thrown in.

Sounds like you may be suited for Security or consulting work where you could set your own hours and terms.

Best of luck!
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Old 05-26-2015, 05:34 AM
 
7,981 posts, read 3,465,270 times
Reputation: 11230
I don't miss working! Tired of the morons younger than my kids telling me what to do and acting like I just fell off the back of a Turnip truck.
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Old 05-26-2015, 05:45 AM
 
761 posts, read 638,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tominftl View Post
I don't miss working! Tired of the morons younger than my kids telling me what to do and acting like I just fell off the back of a Turnip truck.
Yeah, being a dinosaur in IT, having worked most recently with Oracle on a mainframe, I find that my bosses are getting younger and have no concept of what big iron is or was. I have been in long enough and plan an exit next year at age 63.

Had enough guidelines, deadlines, emergencies, focal point reviews, performance reviews and the rest of the corporate adminsitrivia.
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Old 05-26-2015, 07:30 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,911 posts, read 2,878,614 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elliotgb View Post
Yeah, being a dinosaur in IT, having worked most recently with Oracle on a mainframe, I find that my bosses are getting younger and have no concept of what big iron is or was. I have been in long enough and plan an exit next year at age 63.

Had enough guidelines, deadlines, emergencies, focal point reviews, performance reviews and the rest of the corporate adminsitrivia.
Around 35 years in software development myself. In a recent meeting I suggested that a particularly tedious piece of work be given to one of the younger guys "because he still thinks what we do is important". I probably should have thought before speaking; the boss did not seem too amused. But I saw a lot of suppressed chuckles from my peers.
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Old 05-26-2015, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Sugarmill Woods , FL
6,235 posts, read 5,901,687 times
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NO! Never! Not one single day!
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Old 05-26-2015, 10:39 AM
 
1,115 posts, read 1,995,926 times
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I used to be in a very enjoyable career that brought me a great sense of fulfillment. I don't think I would ever want to quit that. However, the thing with these fun and fulfilling jobs is that they are often very competitive, hard to hold onto, lack benefits and stability. It's hard to keep up unless you have a very specific type of personality and lifestyle, one that prefers a spontaneous high peaks and low valleys type of life versus a more stable and grounded family life. I'm now in a more traditional career and don't like it. I can't wait till I retire.
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Old 05-26-2015, 11:08 AM
 
1,770 posts, read 2,442,833 times
Reputation: 5164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
My observation:

The people who love their work continually get better at what they do. For them, it's not really work. Organizations value them highly.

People who hate their work skimp by doing just the minimum required. When the lay offs occur, they are the first to go.

My advice to the OP: Watch your back side.
Not necessarily true. I was very good at what I did and still hear things from folks who tell me they heard how great my reputation was. I also have a good friend that retired as a Dean from the same university where I worked. He was excellent at his job. He hated it. As I did, he retired as soon as possible and is now thoroughly enjoying his retirement.
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Old 05-26-2015, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Delray Beach
1,136 posts, read 1,439,694 times
Reputation: 2510
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Now that the Memorial Day weekend is winding down I wonder how many retirees are missing going back to work tomorrow. Are you?
This was a holiday weekend ??
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