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Old 12-25-2018, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,679 posts, read 49,437,227 times
Reputation: 19129

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The only good thing about working as a 'radiation sponge' is that while we all know that nuclear radiation is harmful at least it is not painful. You know that it is accumulating in your body, and it will likely cause cancer someday. But it does not give you pain immediately.

If I had to beat on a finger with a hammer every day at work, even if they let me rotate between which finger I beat on each day. The immediate pain would drive most people away from going to work after a few years.



Most people think if they were living underwater the biggest thing they would miss would be fresh air. Some people think the worst thing to go without would be sunlight. I have known a lot of men who really wanted to have access to the current songs and movies.

What I missed the most was females. Just being around one. Hearing a female voice maybe once a week would have been great.

I do not miss working, not at all.

Today, I can drive into town anytime I want and right there in the grocery store are females. They have big ones, small ones, young ones, old ones, they come in a wide variety. Some are shopping and others are at the check-out.

My 'pension' is a retainer. If our nation goes to war again, I will be called up to put on my uniform again. I pray that I never have to go back underwater ever again.
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Old 12-25-2018, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
Reputation: 27640
Where I'm at now is constant fingerpointing and covering my rear end. Who would miss this?
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Old 12-25-2018, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Central Illinois -
21,536 posts, read 14,354,179 times
Reputation: 14679
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
The only good thing about working as a 'radiation sponge' is that while we all know that nuclear radiation is harmful at least it is not painful. You know that it is accumulating in your body, and it will likely cause cancer someday. But it does not give you pain immediately.

If I had to beat on a finger with a hammer every day at work, even if they let me rotate between which finger I beat on each day. The immediate pain would drive most people away from going to work after a few years.



Most people think if they were living underwater the biggest thing they would miss would be fresh air. Some people think the worst thing to go without would be sunlight. I have known a lot of men who really wanted to have access to the current songs and movies.

What I missed the most was females. Just being around one. Hearing a female voice maybe once a week would have been great.

I do not miss working, not at all.

Today, I can drive into town anytime I want and right there in the grocery store are females. They have big ones, small ones, young ones, old ones, they come in a wide variety. Some are shopping and others are at the check-out.

My 'pension' is a retainer. If our nation goes to war again, I will be called up to put on my uniform again. I pray that I never have to go back underwater ever again.
That's an interesting career you have left behind. I wonder though, do you get tested for cancer regularly? Are there any types of cancer you are particularly more vulnerable to than I am? And has the USN allowed female sailors on submarines yet? I know they are allowed everywhere else.

I am one of those people who is counting the days until they retire (Feb. 2023) and there is no way I'm gonna miss working. If my coworkers were more like myself, that is to say able to get along with other people well, I might enjoy my job slightly more, but most of them are no different than when they were teenagers in High School. (I work in a factory) However, my employer pays me well and treats me well, and they also provide a small pension, something that people being hired on over the past 15 years are not eligible for. So I'm very grateful for what I have and that allows me to put up with a lot of nonsense and not get upset by it. I take it all in stride and put my best foot forward every day. Management respects that and they have always treated me well. I look forward to an entirely new career when I retire at age 56.
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Old 12-25-2018, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,679 posts, read 49,437,227 times
Reputation: 19129
Quote:
Originally Posted by odanny View Post
That's an interesting career you have left behind. I wonder though, do you get tested for cancer regularly?
I was told to expect brain cancer.

I am currently battling aggressive prostate cancer. I had the surgery in 2014. It came back in 2018, I did radiation therapy this summer and hormone therapy is on-going.



Quote:
... has the USN allowed female sailors on submarines yet? I know they are allowed everywhere else.
The US Navy has introduced a few females on subs as supply officers. I have been following the process of introducing females onto subs. The last article that I read on the topic, out of 18 who completed the screening and training, 10 served onboard subs for a year. And when offered guaranteed advancement and cash bonuses, zero agreed to stay in the career field.

I am sure that it will turn out to be another numbers game, just as it has been with men. You need 100 who can pass the prerequisites, screening, and training before you can get one that will make it a career.



It is all about gaining a proper perspective. When dragging a fire hose behind you fighting a raging fire, as soon as you see incoming seawater remember that the sea water will usually put out the fire on its own. If we don't die, in a week the air scrubbers will have cleaned up the air enough that we can remove our respirators, and we can concentrate on how we are going to get back up to the surface.
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Old 12-25-2018, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
31,628 posts, read 19,947,296 times
Reputation: 45699
To a certain extent I miss the validation of my skills, though my husband certainly validates me.
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Old 12-26-2018, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,294 posts, read 3,340,391 times
Reputation: 4829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I was told to expect brain cancer.

I am currently battling aggressive prostate cancer. I had the surgery in 2014. It came back in 2018, I did radiation therapy this summer and hormone therapy is on-going.





The US Navy has introduced a few females on subs as supply officers. I have been following the process of introducing females onto subs. The last article that I read on the topic, out of 18 who completed the screening and training, 10 served onboard subs for a year. And when offered guaranteed advancement and cash bonuses, zero agreed to stay in the career field.

I am sure that it will turn out to be another numbers game, just as it has been with men. You need 100 who can pass the prerequisites, screening, and training before you can get one that will make it a career.



It is all about gaining a proper perspective. When dragging a fire hose behind you fighting a raging fire, as soon as you see incoming seawater remember that the sea water will usually put out the fire on its own. If we don't die, in a week the air scrubbers will have cleaned up the air enough that we can remove our respirators, and we can concentrate on how we are going to get back up to the surface.
__________________________________________________ __
..... I have a personal interest in the circumstances related to your situation, prompting some questions:.....if you prefer not to answer them. I fully understand....

.....#1/ was it suggested by your Doctors that the Prostate cancer was caused by your constant exposure to the "type of radiation" resulting from your time serving as a Submariner on a Nuclear Powered Sub?

.....#2/ Was your surgery a :: "Radical Prostechtomony" with removal of the entire Prostate Gland and all surrounding tissue and margins, AND....... was the surgery done within approx 14 days of your initial diagnosis?
......Further related PSA question: :.....was there a rapid rise in the PSA Number from the initial PSA test to the one 90 days later :...example;:...3.1 >>> to 9.3?
....#3/ Did the "numerical values" resulting from the periodic PSA blood tests that were taken every 3 months after surgery,,, show an increasing
Numerical Value, thus indicating the cancer had returned?

I realize everyone's Prostate Cancer Situation is ""different" , and therefore "procedures" may differ significantly from case-to-case.

I sincerely hope your current situation results in a "complete cure" and you remain cancer-free!!!!!

Good luck and my prayers are with you!
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Old 12-26-2018, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,679 posts, read 49,437,227 times
Reputation: 19129
Montana Griz -

#1 - No, my oncologist has no idea what causes prostate cancer.

#2 - Yes I had a "radical prostatectomy" with the DaVinci robotic surgery device. It was done a week after my biopsy [12 core samples all showed cancer with a high gleason score].

My PSA peaked in the 30s. After the surgery, my PSA went to <0.04 and held there for 4 years.

#3 yes.
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Old 12-27-2018, 03:45 AM
 
Location: On the road
5,930 posts, read 2,887,264 times
Reputation: 11341
I miss a little bit the excitement/terror of a big software release going live. It was always a culmination of a lot of hard work and long hours (which I didn't miss) and there were always fires to fight immediately afterwards followed by a period where people all took more time off.

I also miss going out to lunch with the gang, everywhere I physically worked we'd get a good group of regulars going out to lunch every day.

Overall though don't miss a thing, prefer having my freedom to do what I want every day.
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Old 12-27-2018, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,359 posts, read 3,694,371 times
Reputation: 4085
No
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Old 12-27-2018, 10:46 PM
 
Location: Approximately 50 miles from Missoula MT/38 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
2,294 posts, read 3,340,391 times
Reputation: 4829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Montana Griz -

#1 - No, my oncologist has no idea what causes prostate cancer.

#2 - Yes I had a "radical prostatectomy" with the DaVinci robotic surgery device. It was done a week after my biopsy [12 core samples all showed cancer with a high gleason score].

My PSA peaked in the 30s. After the surgery, my PSA went to <0.04 and held there for 4 years.

#3 yes.
Thank you for responding.
My work history included 30 years out of 40 yrs total, that put me in various areas in Nuclear Powered Electrical Generating Plants that required wearing radiation resistant suits.........I have often wondered if there was any connection: ..."work environment >>>>cancer!..........who knows??

My surgery was on my 70th birthday in 2002 and included the outlet portion of the bladder, ....... minimal follow up laser & radiation treatments were required. All PSA tests since 2002 have come back
"0.0" +/- , thank God!
The ever increasing amount of incontinence over the years is an inconvenience, but certainly readily accepted vs the alternative!

Again, I wish you all the best, and hope & pray you "beat this thing"!
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