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Old 05-26-2015, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,997 posts, read 3,490,435 times
Reputation: 10552

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My wake-up call was whwn I was befriending elder who insisted she needed no help. I did worry about her but was limited in what I could do. There was nothing I could do except keep my employers informed there was a problem.

It was sad for me when I was told she was in a nursing home but I was also thankful. She died shortly after.
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Old 05-27-2015, 01:19 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,985 posts, read 54,752,819 times
Reputation: 31369
The problem is that the older seniors may have never learned to use a computer, and without family to help, are not even aware of programs available to help them. For one (late) relative born in 1919 meant that she was a "donut" baby, and only received $700/month social security. She managed on that over 25 years, making it to age 95 including two hip replacements, and the last 12 years at an adult family home, because we did the research and found her the services and assistance that she needed.
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Old 05-27-2015, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,795,112 times
Reputation: 32309
"Epidemic"? That emotionally over-wrought word is another objection I have to the thread title, which comes from the title of the article. Whatever the true number of hungry seniors is, it is certainly not an "epidemic". Why would the numbers be greater now than five years ago? Ten years ago? Fifteen years ago?
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Metropolis IL
1,605 posts, read 1,901,573 times
Reputation: 2352
Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
There is no way to ascertain the numbers of seniors going hungry. No one is going to find them, even by going door to door. Those who are living alone with no family or friends nearby are not going to be found, even by social service agencies, unless they themselves are savvy enough to know where to look for help. I would bet it's a much larger problem than any who are well off would want to admit.
I'm not needy nor hungry, by any means. But I am a senior, with by design little family and no close relationships. The last thing I want is some social services worker meddling in my affairs. The occupation attracts busy bodies, who operate under the facade that they are helping people. In truth, many lust for power, and drawing people under the umbrella of government programs facilitates that. After which they will orchestrate one's life under the authority of government agencies. Once you let them in, you are on their list, and your life will never be the same.
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,997 posts, read 3,490,435 times
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Yeah, BLS, that's how the senior I was working with had said. She was leery at first (and I'd been told she was crabby & mean). To be perfectly honest, I never saw either trait. We hit it off from day 1 and had a great relationship until she had to go to a nursing home. Unfortunately since I only saw her every other week, it was too late to see her when I found out & then she was gone. I like to thnk though, that I gave her comfort, laughs & yes, even love in the last months of her life.
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Old 05-28-2015, 07:01 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,154,191 times
Reputation: 8970
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Sorry, I'm not even going to read the blog. I am a very low income senior, and not only can I get a lot of free food at food banks, and cheap food cooked for me at the senior center, and when I get older (not quite old enough yet) I will also qualify for free meals brought to me, and there are also free brown bag lunches. This doesn't even count all of the churches and other charities that would be happy to provide free food.

AND decent food is cheap. I happen to love ramen and beans and rice. But, I can also buy meat on sale and stick it in the crock pot, etc.

So, from my point of view, it's ridiculous to think that any senior in America is going hungry, unless they are spending all of their money on their medical marijuana and/or cigarettes, or gambling (which can be a problem) or going to the bar, etc. And even then, if they can get to a phone, they will be able to get free food.

There are way too many resources out there that we qualify for. Just call 211. Or go to 211.org.

Try renting a room in a house with 8 people - I have no freezer space and very limited refrigerator space. Do you really cook your meat as soon as you bring it home, or do you first refrigerate it?
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Old 05-30-2015, 07:04 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,972 posts, read 18,975,137 times
Reputation: 33943
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLS2753 View Post
I'm not needy nor hungry, by any means. But I am a senior, with by design little family and no close relationships. The last thing I want is some social services worker meddling in my affairs. The occupation attracts busy bodies, who operate under the facade that they are helping people. In truth, many lust for power, and drawing people under the umbrella of government programs facilitates that. After which they will orchestrate one's life under the authority of government agencies. Once you let them in, you are on their list, and your life will never be the same.
Well, since you're not in need, then how do you know? I worked as an assistant social worker with the elderly a long time ago and none of us were busy bodies, prying into people's lives. We asked them what they needed and we tried to provide it. For a while I delivered meals on wheels. Most people are appreciative.
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Old 05-30-2015, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,787 posts, read 17,725,620 times
Reputation: 27863
Being from a poor area in Appalachia, I can tell you that a lot of seniors are simply too proud to admit they are struggling. Many were able to provide for their own food during their working lives, yet can't bring themselves to say they need help in their old age.

Most of the people on this board are in fairly affluent areas like the northeast, California, or fairly well to do retiree enclaves throughout the country. Most are reasonably well-to-do. However, in poor, rural areas, quality food is often simply not available, at any price. I used to work in a rural area of southwest VA in a town of about 3,000 people. There was a budget grocer, a mainstream grocer, and Walmart. None of them had the quality of food you'd find in a more affluent, populated area. Healthy food wasn't available there without a long trek back (half hour or so) to an area with better grocery stores. Even if it was, most of the locals were too poor to afford it.

I think the problem is probably widely understudied.
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Old 05-31-2015, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,164 posts, read 23,134,789 times
Reputation: 35440
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emigrations View Post
Being from a poor area in Appalachia, I can tell you that a lot of seniors are simply too proud to admit they are struggling. Many were able to provide for their own food during their working lives, yet can't bring themselves to say they need help in their old age.

Most of the people on this board are in fairly affluent areas like the northeast, California, or fairly well to do retiree enclaves throughout the country. Most are reasonably well-to-do. However, in poor, rural areas, quality food is often simply not available, at any price. I used to work in a rural area of southwest VA in a town of about 3,000 people. There was a budget grocer, a mainstream grocer, and Walmart. None of them had the quality of food you'd find in a more affluent, populated area. Healthy food wasn't available there without a long trek back (half hour or so) to an area with better grocery stores. Even if it was, most of the locals were too poor to afford it.

I think the problem is probably widely understudied.
I gotta say harumph to "quality food." How do you define that?

If you have a budget grocer, a mainstream grocer and a Walmart, why can't you find something worth eating?

And if you're thinking everything has to be organic, etc., you should look up what farmers can spray on your veggies and still use the label "organic." You'll probably decide to just eat the cheap stuff like me.
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Old 05-31-2015, 08:30 AM
 
14,283 posts, read 24,068,890 times
Reputation: 20143
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I gotta say harumph to "quality food." How do you define that?

If you have a budget grocer, a mainstream grocer and a Walmart, why can't you find something worth eating?

And if you're thinking everything has to be organic, etc., you should look up what farmers can spray on your veggies and still use the label "organic." You'll probably decide to just eat the cheap stuff like me.

Walmart stores, even those is more remote locations, carry a full line of organics.
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