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Old 06-01-2015, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,088 posts, read 22,934,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I assume that alcohol and tobacco products are already disallowed?
LOL. They just sell the SNAP food they buy so they can buy them.

"Hey, Joe, how about a nice sirloin steak for a pack of Marlboro's?"
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Old 06-01-2015, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Idaho
1,452 posts, read 1,153,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I assume that alcohol and tobacco products are already disallowed?
Here is the list of disallowed items
Eligible Food Items | Food and Nutrition Service

Quote:
Households CANNOT use SNAP benefits to buy:

Beer, wine, liquor, cigarettes or tobacco
Any nonfood items, such as:
pet foods
soaps, paper products
household supplies
Vitamins and medicines
Food that will be eaten in the store
Hot foods
and here is the information on % of people on food stamp by state
http://www.governing.com/gov-data/fo...otals-map.html

Quote:
The most recent data indicates about 15.7 million American households are on food stamps, with enrollment varying greatly from state to state.

The number of participants for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, climbed steadily beginning with the arrival of the Great Recession. Enrollment has since stabilized, declining slightly in 2013.

As a share of all households, Oregon (19.8 percent), Mississippi (19.4 percent) and Maine (18 percent) had the highest SNAP participation rates in 2013, according to Census estimates. Wyoming (5.9 percent) recorded the lowest SNAP participation rate of any state.
There are no questions that there are some food stamp abusers but all the food stamp users that I have seen at grocery stores seemed deserving. While some users had different choices of food and drink than mine (white bread, sodas etc), I had not seen anyone purchased expensive items like steak and seafood!
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Old 06-01-2015, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,088 posts, read 22,934,448 times
Reputation: 35212
Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
Here is the list of disallowed items
Eligible Food Items | Food and Nutrition Service



and here is the information on % of people on food stamp by state
Who Is On Food Stamps, By State



There are no questions that there are some food stamp abusers but all the food stamp users that I have seen at grocery stores seemed deserving. While some users had different choices of food and drink than mine (white bread, sodas etc), I had not seen anyone purchased expensive items like steak and seafood!
The reason some states have more people on SNAP than others (including Oregon) is because they give SSI recipients SNAP, instead of a cash supplement like CA does. CA does have some SNAP recipients, but they give cash supplements for SSI recipients, instead of SNAP.

And you're right. You can't buy toothpaste or toilet paper with SNAP. Which is why I'd much prefer to get the cash supplement, so I can budget that money the way I want. It's nuts for the government to say, for instance, that I must spend $175 on food only. Whereas here in CA, I can use that $175 on beans, rice, meat on sale, and also buy my toilet paper and toothpaste.

I live up on the Oregon border, and honestly the closest town in Oregon is a much nicer town. But, if I move to OR, I would have to get SNAP and be limited to having to spend it all on food, and then my personal supplies would have to come out of my SSI. I'd end up with tons of food I wouldn't know what to do with every month, yet be scraping by to buy toilet paper.
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Old 06-04-2015, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,992 posts, read 23,900,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
While I don't believe the media hype of the hidden epidemic of senior (elder) hunger, I have no doubt that there are many seniors living below the poverty line and may go hungry at time or have poor diet leading to all kinds of health problems

I did a search for the statistics and found several national studies

Senior Hunger Statistics | Feeding America



What surprises me is this prediction:


This article gives the reason why the food insecurity is more serious for seniors



Here is the link to an in-depth study of the subject

http://www.nfesh.org/wp-content/uplo...icans-2011.pdf

The study shows increasing trends in the risks: risk of senior hunger goes from ~5% in 2001 to ~6% in 2011 and the number at risk goes from ~3% in 2001 to ~5% in 2011

The State-Level Estimates of Risk of Hunger (Food Insecurity) of Senior in 2011 vary quite a bit from state to state with the lowest in Maryland at 3.71% and the highest of 11.82% in Kansas.

I expect further breakdowns within each state will show that small rural towns have much higher rates than urban areas or big cities.
Yes, it's not always about having enough money to buy enough food. Sometimes it's as much about transportation, mobility, loneliness or depression or illness... or a combination two or three of those things. Figuring out 'the system' under those circumstances can be quite daunting, if it happens at all.
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Old 06-06-2015, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,316 posts, read 1,344,607 times
Reputation: 1928
Y'all will probably bash me but I'm going to say it anyway.
I live in rural Tx. I am not a senior but know many seniors.
What I see is some elderly are unable to prepare healthy meals due to mobility issues. . Can't stand long enough to shop and prepare the meal.

They depend upon friends and neighbors to pick up a sausage and biscut, hamburger etc.

Living alone they just don't cook. The food they buy is processed, boxed and restaurant food.With the occasional salad thrown in.

The other seniors are on many, many medications and have medical issues which arise from being over medicated.
Their only social life is the Doctors office.These are the ones who are obese usually a side effect from multiple medications.

Then.. you have the alcholic, ciggerette smoking senior where food and nutrition is an after thought.

This is not every seniors reality but many seniors daily existence. .

I wittness this..
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Old 06-06-2015, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,732,288 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by shh1313 View Post
Y'all will probably bash me but I'm going to say it anyway.
I live in rural Tx. I am not a senior but know many seniors.
What I see is some elderly are unable to prepare healthy meals due to mobility issues. . Can't stand long enough to shop and prepare the meal.

They depend upon friends and neighbors to pick up a sausage and biscut, hamburger etc.

Living alone they just don't cook. The food they buy is processed, boxed and restaurant food.With the occasional salad thrown in.

The other seniors are on many, many medications and have medical issues which arise from being over medicated.
Their only social life is the Doctors office.These are the ones who are obese usually a side effect from multiple medications.

Then.. you have the alcholic, ciggerette smoking senior where food and nutrition is an after thought.

This is not every seniors reality but many seniors daily existence. .

I wittness this..
Why would anyone "bash" you? There is nothing objectionable about what you wrote. From your own observations, you told about various different reasons why seniors may not be getting good nutrition. Thank you for the good, informative post.
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Old 06-06-2015, 08:46 AM
 
14,260 posts, read 23,983,382 times
Reputation: 20051
Quote:
Originally Posted by shh1313 View Post
Y'all will probably bash me but I'm going to say it anyway.
I live in rural Tx. I am not a senior but know many seniors.
What I see is some elderly are unable to prepare healthy meals due to mobility issues. . Can't stand long enough to shop and prepare the meal.

They depend upon friends and neighbors to pick up a sausage and biscut, hamburger etc.

Living alone they just don't cook. The food they buy is processed, boxed and restaurant food.With the occasional salad thrown in.

The other seniors are on many, many medications and have medical issues which arise from being over medicated.


In addition, there are a lot of seniors, usually men, you just do NOT know how to cook. When they lose their wife, they do not eat correctly.
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