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Old 05-25-2015, 12:25 PM
 
823 posts, read 3,066,243 times
Reputation: 694

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https://tulsage.wordpress.com/2015/0...nior-servings/

If you can't get it just go to the main page
https://tulsage.wordpress.com
and look on the right for the one called "Is Your Grandma Hungry and You Don't Know It?"

Also on the right there is a post right under it called Mom May Need Something You Can’t Buy At The Mall that talks about how much is spent on Mother's Day alone, for cards, flowers and perfume. It is in the billions. So much good, healthy food could be bought to help a Senior, instead of giving them something they don't need or want.
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Old 05-25-2015, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,735,102 times
Reputation: 32304
Interesting that the methodology used to determine most of the statistics cited is not specified. Color me skeptical, not skeptical that hungry seniors exist, but that they exist in the numbers and percentages claimed.

Also, it is possible that Oklahoma (the state which the article is about) presents a different picture from the national picture. Nationally, seniors (as a group) are better off financially than any other age demographic. Now that statistic doesn't help the ones who are in fact hungry, of course.

The article is an advocacy essay, and to its credit does not make any claim to be a neutral investigation of hunger among seniors in the state of Oklahoma.
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Old 05-25-2015, 01:48 PM
 
11,935 posts, read 20,386,478 times
Reputation: 19328
My mom was on SNAP -- 16 bucks a month. It bought her milk (she liked a specific dairy), and some other foods. But we made sure she had access to the fine foods she liked. My sister and I got her gift cards to her favorite boutique grocery, so she could get really good fruits and veggies and meats (she loved to cook and was really good at it), and my other sister bought the fill in card for the regular grocery store.

It helped she lived in a small apartment and she didn't need more things.

I also preferred to send flowers whenever. The selection was better, the bouquet was fuller and the presentation not rushed when I did off holiday.
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Old 05-25-2015, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,094 posts, read 22,952,534 times
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Sorry, I'm not even going to read the blog. I am a very low income senior, and not only can I get a lot of free food at food banks, and cheap food cooked for me at the senior center, and when I get older (not quite old enough yet) I will also qualify for free meals brought to me, and there are also free brown bag lunches. This doesn't even count all of the churches and other charities that would be happy to provide free food.

AND decent food is cheap. I happen to love ramen and beans and rice. But, I can also buy meat on sale and stick it in the crock pot, etc.

So, from my point of view, it's ridiculous to think that any senior in America is going hungry, unless they are spending all of their money on their medical marijuana and/or cigarettes, or gambling (which can be a problem) or going to the bar, etc. And even then, if they can get to a phone, they will be able to get free food.

There are way too many resources out there that we qualify for. Just call 211. Or go to 211.org.
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Old 05-25-2015, 03:16 PM
 
11,935 posts, read 20,386,478 times
Reputation: 19328
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Sorry, I'm not even going to read the blog. I am a very low income senior, and not only can I get a lot of free food at food banks, and cheap food cooked for me at the senior center, and when I get older (not quite old enough yet) I will also qualify for free meals brought to me, and there are also free brown bag lunches. This doesn't even count all of the churches and other charities that would be happy to provide free food.

AND decent food is cheap. I happen to love ramen and beans and rice. But, I can also buy meat on sale and stick it in the crock pot, etc.

So, from my point of view, it's ridiculous to think that any senior in America is going hungry, unless they are spending all of their money on their medical marijuana and/or cigarettes, or gambling (which can be a problem) or going to the bar, etc. And even then, if they can get to a phone, they will be able to get free food.

There are way too many resources out there that we qualify for. Just call 211. Or go to 211.org.
While beans and rice can be healthy for a lot of people (I'm diabetic and beans make my blood glucose go up and stay up for HOURS....) ramen is not healthy AT ALL. It's very high in sodium, very high in carbs and has little nutritional value on it's own.
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Old 05-25-2015, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,094 posts, read 22,952,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
While beans and rice can be healthy for a lot of people (I'm diabetic and beans make my blood glucose go up and stay up for HOURS....) ramen is not healthy AT ALL. It's very high in sodium, very high in carbs and has little nutritional value on it's own.
My point is you can eat well for cheap. How about eggs?

If your particular diet requires imported caviar from Russia, then you probably have a unique problem that would require you to go hungry if you were too poor to buy it. Or get a charity to buy it for you.

Otherwise, it's entirely possible in America to eat a decent diet either for free or cheap.

Example: For breakfast I ate instant grits, which I happen to really like. I can get a box of 12 for less then $3.00 at Walmart.

For lunch I made a little egg sandwich made from an English muffin (bought a bag of 6 for about $1.40 at Fred Meyer). Put on a little chopped tomato, some yummy fancy mustard, a little grated cheese (bought locally for only $2.50/pound and I grated it myself and put it into a ziplock baggie in the fridge), and some chopped up Canadian bacon I bought on sale and froze a bunch of packages of - for about $2.50/pound.

Bought a flat of 5 dozen eggs for about $10. So, about 17 cents per egg.

Was delicious. And healthy. So far, I have probably spent, what? Maybe $1.00 for breakfast and lunch?

For dinner, I will be cooking up some Jasmine rice, which I love. It was a splurge for me, but still, rice is practically free per meal.

I will be adding some cooked chopped chicken I got for free at a food bank, some frozen peas I bought at the store, some red sweet pepper I found canned at the Dollar Tree, and a can of cream of Chicken soup I also got at the Dollar Tree. And some fresh onion, sauteed in Olive oil.

How much will dinner cost me? Maybe another dollar? The pot of creamy chicken and veggies will make several meals for me.

I also have another pork roast I got for $2.50/pound on sale that I can throw in the crock pot another day. I also got a beef pot roast in the clearance section at Safeway for $2/pound that I cooked up and froze in baggies in the freezer.

I also have some pinto beans that I cooked up with onions and some spices and mashed by hand into a fat free refried beans mix, that I froze into separate jars that are in the freezer, and some ground pork I got on sale in the clearance section of Safeway, that I added spices and fresh onions to, cooked up and froze into baggies. These make for great burritos.

If you can't eat carbs, then don't. Buy eggs, or meat on sale, and whatever fresh or frozen veggies are available and cheap. Cabbage comes to mind...

Whine or adapt. Or better yet, adapt with wine. Which I also buy cheap. My latest score: a box of 5 liters of California "Crisp White" Franzia wine, for $6.00 at Grocery Outlet. It will go great with my Chicken & Veggies ala Rice tonight.
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Old 05-25-2015, 03:52 PM
 
14,260 posts, read 23,987,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Interesting that the methodology used to determine most of the statistics cited is not specified. Color me skeptical, not skeptical that hungry seniors exist, but that they exist in the numbers and percentages claimed.

Also, it is possible that Oklahoma (the state which the article is about) presents a different picture from the national picture. Nationally, seniors (as a group) are better off financially than any other age demographic. Now that statistic doesn't help the ones who are in fact hungry, of course.

The article is an advocacy essay, and to its credit does not make any claim to be a neutral investigation of hunger among seniors in the state of Oklahoma.


I will not debate the numbers in any article about hunger among senior citizens (or children). I do believe that many articles greatly overstate the problem in order to justify expansions in their Federal, state, and local programs.

I think that there are a lot of seniors who do not receive proper nutrition. I would attribute that to a lack of mobility - if you cannot get to the grocery store, you cannot get what you need. I also attribute a lot of it to social isolation - seniors who have no contact with family and community. In the larger cities, you have a number of charities - Salvation Army, Meals of Wheels, church based programs, etc. - that help to address this issue.

However, in rural areas, you do not have the same networks available, although many neighbors do look out for their senior neighbors.

I am convinced that if millions were made available, the city folks would get nearly all of it and the needs of the rural poor would be ignored.

By the way, I went back and reread the article. It is Feeding America boilerplate as I saw nearly an identical article in Illinois recently.
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Old 05-25-2015, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,972 posts, read 3,457,347 times
Reputation: 10494
I too spend little on food, although the other day I did spend $90 on groceries because I recently moved into a 1 bedroom apartment and needed all spices, marinades, etc. But my regular grocery receipt would not be much. Fruits & veggies, chicken, tuna fish & salmon. That's about it since the $90 included jasmine rice, brown rice, potatoes, onions, garlic & spices.
I also spend $4 a day for the program from the Senior Center but may stop that as the meals are not that nutritious except when they do fish. We'll see. So that is $20 a week. I can actually make things cheaper but like the thought that I'm helping the Senior Center, giving work for the volunteers & if I don't feel like cooking, I don't have to.
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Old 05-26-2015, 01:06 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,838 posts, read 18,851,047 times
Reputation: 33746
I don't think $16 is enough to help a senior to eat well. The food at senior centers, if mine is any example, is not nutritious. It all seems to come out of a can, nothing fresh or even frozen. Not everyone can get out to a food pantry either. And sometimes a senior is too tired or unwell to cook from scratch every day of the week and a decent frozen meal would be appropriate to have on hand.

Yet the money for food seems to go to families with kids. That's okay if those kids already existed before the money was handed out but I'm not in favor of women having more kids just so they can get more welfare or more food.

The seniors who are going hungry (whether the information comes from the quoted article or not) don't have much choice in the matter if they are not well enough to work or get out. $16 wouldn't go very far.
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Old 05-26-2015, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,973,893 times
Reputation: 15649
There is no way to ascertain the numbers of seniors going hungry. No one is going to find them, even by going door to door. Those who are living alone with no family or friends nearby are not going to be found, even by social service agencies, unless they themselves are savvy enough to know where to look for help. I would bet it's a much larger problem than any who are well off would want to admit.
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