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Old 08-30-2016, 10:16 PM
 
4,315 posts, read 2,515,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
I'm not concerned about diversity. I'm concerned with local crime. If it's a low crime area I don't care how much or how little diversity there is.
I agree that people who go out of their way to "seek" diversity are usually white people who think they have something to prove.
Give me a low crime area any day of the week even if it has zero diversity.
I did about 10 years of extensive research on relocating to the south upon retirement.
Diversity didn't bother me one way or another but no way would I move to a high crime area.


I used City-Data Detailed Profile and soon noticed a correlation between diversity and higher crime rates.


I soon noticed that by seeing the racial make up of a city I could nearly guess the crime rate ( which was listed farther down in the profile)


Yes, there are a few exceptions, but I could be blindfolded and throw darts at a US map and 90% of the time or more the higher percent of Blacks, the higher the crime rate.


That isn't being racist. It is a fact.
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Old 08-30-2016, 10:55 PM
 
Location: Haiku
4,056 posts, read 2,566,050 times
Reputation: 5975
What an oxymoronic question. People go live in "communities" because they want to be around other people who are just like them - same ethnicity, same religion, same everything.

If you want diversity, go live in the wild, that is, where everyone else lives, like in a regular neighborhood.

Me, I don't seek it or shun it. But where I live is pretty diverse - people from all over the pacific: Hawaiians, Samoans, Filipinos, Japanese, Chinese, Indian, Latin Americans. And yeah, Europeans and Americans (whatever that means).
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Old 08-31-2016, 08:19 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,748 posts, read 54,373,866 times
Reputation: 31030
Diversity, or the lack of it are not even on the list of factors for where to retire. Things like low crime, natural beauty, quiet, affordability, access to healthcare, and location within a reasonable distance of the kids/grandkids are the important considerations.
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Old 08-31-2016, 10:44 AM
 
11,963 posts, read 5,102,113 times
Reputation: 18693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Diversity, or the lack of it are not even on the list of factors for where to retire. Things like low crime, natural beauty, quiet, affordability, access to healthcare, and location within a reasonable distance of the kids/grandkids are the important considerations.
I couldn't agree more. Those are the factors I look at when choosing where to move to in retirement. Diversity has been pushed down peoples throats these days because of political correctness. I won't consider it at all. If a place is diverse and meets all the other criteria then fine. There are web sites out there that put diversity among the top things when ratings cities. I've seen cities and towns rated highly and called wonderful places to retire in because of this. Then you look at the crime statistics and they are riddled with burglaries, thefts, rapes, and even murders. No thank you. I'll pick a nice quiet town with a pretty scenery and low crime rate. The last think I'm going to do is worry about political correctness when picking where my retirement home will be.
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Old 08-31-2016, 11:11 AM
 
14,253 posts, read 23,969,886 times
Reputation: 20025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Diversity, or the lack of it are not even on the list of factors for where to retire. Things like low crime, natural beauty, quiet, affordability, access to healthcare, and location within a reasonable distance of the kids/grandkids are the important considerations.

What do you mean by diversity? I was in a county in Ohio that was 95% white last month. (Wayne Co., OH)

No diversity?

50% urban, 50% rural. 8% Amish, 20% Mennonite and a growing Mexican population that is not identified as ... all the census data in six years old. Part of the community is very conservative, part quite liberal.

However, all the diversity is measured by person with a particular agenda who want to protect their turf and their government subsidies and preferences.

I found that it is nearly impossible to convince those types that white students from Appalachia, sons of coal miners who are high school drop-outs are underprivileged and should receive some preferences.

It is one reason that traveling to Canada is a pleasure free of all the politically correct BS.
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Old 09-01-2016, 11:23 PM
 
Location: California
30,684 posts, read 33,445,013 times
Reputation: 26103
Ethnic diversity probably doesn't appeal to many people because it's often a barrier. While we paint pictures of various colors of people holding hands while smiling and sharing everything that's not reality. The truth is I don't want to think about that sort of thing even now, even though I'm not retired, so I actively avoid it. I don't avoid people of any sort, I just avoid the "diversity" for the sake of diversity. People either get along and enjoy each other or they struggle to find common ground and annoy each other, that's what divides regardless of anyone's ethnicity. Nobody wants to struggle just for the sake of having diverse friends. It's not a learning experience and it doesn't make you grow as a person, it's just another task that nobody actually wants or needs to deal with.
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Old 09-02-2016, 04:09 AM
 
Location: R.I.
970 posts, read 602,748 times
Reputation: 4165
Quote:
Originally Posted by questioner2 View Post
I read somewhere that most retirement communities are not ethnically diverse. In fact most people who move into a retirement community are White. I visit relatives in retirement communities in Arizona and Florida and are shocked to see mostly white people in States where a good percentage of people are minority.

I wonder if many retirees have decided that they want to move to a community closer to what they experienced in the the 1940s, 50s and 60s before America changed demographically. Is that why so many retirement communities are white dominated?
I have lived in an essentially white community my entire life that was originally made up of mostly Italian and Azorean Portuguese immigrants. My maternal grandfather was born in Italy and immigrated to the US at age 17 and moved into a section of town where my grandmother's family lived who were from the same village in Italy. These early Italian immigrants were able to keep their cultural identity alive by establishing businesses, a school, and church that supported their culture. This community was still intact when I was a child and for that reason I attended a Catholic school where the Italian language was taught, and the church it was affiliated with also had several Sunday Masses in Italian. With the deaths of the "old timers", and the desire for the following generations to pursue the American dream of higher education, home ownership, etc., urban sprawl followed and this community began to slowly fade away to virtually non existence. Although there is still a strong Italian and Azorean Portuguese presence in my town the cultural identity of both these ethnic groups have been significantly diluted.

I suspect the majority of those who are now living in predominately white communities in Florida and elsewhere experienced similar as I and no longer identify culturally as being an Italian American, Polish American, etc. and either seek out or end up in like communities as "birds of a feather flock together". Those like many of my Hispanic, Cambodian, etc., friends still have a strong cultural identity, and for this reason they that would have no interest in moving to a community where their cultural identity could very likely be diluted or worst lost so they "flock together" in an attempt to preserve their cultural identity for the next generation.
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Old 09-02-2016, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,511 posts, read 8,751,470 times
Reputation: 12192
We don't have anything like that in Denmark!
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Old 09-03-2016, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Central Massachusetts
4,800 posts, read 4,842,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frihed89 View Post
We don't have anything like that in Denmark!
Denmark is a postage stamp size compared to the US. We have so many people from so many places with so many beliefs and ideas that it is hard to imagine if you have never been or lived here.
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Old 09-03-2016, 06:11 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
Reputation: 34728
Default Vanilla pudding with two raisins only once.

I certainly lived in a racially and ethnically diverse neighborhood for most of my working life in Manhattan, at first it was very rundown and had a fairly high crime rate. (I was only proximate to four murders in my 41 years in NYC: a guy got shot in the daytime across the street from me in Midtown, an off duty cop was killed and literally butchered in a bathtub on my block, my super and a guest were killed in his apartment, and a wiseguy I knew on my block was shot in our neighborhood hangout. But a murder a decade in the heart of a big city is statistical small potatoes.) By about the late 70's my part of our neighborhood became gentrified and we were treated to higher rents and an influx of Bridge and Tunnel immigrants - they were a strange crew. (On the other hand, this was when the guy on my block was shot, and by that time we were a gentrified, highly desirable neighborhood!) My last ten years were spent in another racially and ethnically diverse area, but the big difference was that it did not function as a neighborhood as the other area had.

In 2000, I decided to make a really big move in retirement - to Europe. My first stop was only intended as a six-month holiday and it was in a Portuguese town in Madeira. When I settled on the Portuguese mainland it was in a town that also had Brazilians - of all racial mixtures, Brits, Germans and Dutch living there and sometimes in business, and then an influx of Ukrainians and Russians, and there are a few Africans from former Portuguese colonies.

Though infinitely smaller than Manhattan, it does remind me a bit of my days there because there is such a mixture of people. However, all parts of the town are much cleaner and there is little crime. I did "audit" a retirement development in Santa Fe for five weeks in 2009. Everyone was white, most from the East Coast, most former professionals, most college educated - and most having lived rather conventional lives. There was a exuberant female retiree from the armed services and a Greek-American guy from NYC, who'd been in the bar business. Many nice people, but not a place for me despite the other more regular type guy New Yorker and the female veteran. It was vanilla pudding with two raisins.

I haven't died from diversity yet, so I expect my demise will more likely come from old age.
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