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Old 07-10-2017, 04:24 PM
 
12,026 posts, read 5,142,014 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
There is more than just racial diversity. How about political diversity? You won't find that in Silicon Valley. What you will find is political correctness and groupthink to the nth degree and utter intolerance toward anyone who thinks differently.
This area of the country is the Mecca of liberalism. If you're not a liberal, you will feel rather uncomfortable living there unless you never discuss politics with anyone and look the other way at most things going on.
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Old 07-11-2017, 03:40 PM
 
29,784 posts, read 34,885,423 times
Reputation: 11710
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
You are making some large assumptions. All of us white people are the same? Hardly. We come from a large number of countries, we have different faiths and many different values.

I understand that the standard liberal approach requires that you sit and count heads of the number of racial minorities as the only for of diversity.
I use to stun people when I would say my neighborhood had no diversity and was very homogeneous. Yes it had Whites, Asians, Blacks, Indian Sub continent etc etc. However everyone lived in a big single family home, Very few were divorced. Almost all had 1-2 kids with the occasional three kid household. Everyone had a college degree, many had advanced degrees. Kids did well in high school and college with few exceptions and all the lawns were well manicured. Diverse in religion and skin color yes. Diverse in lifestyle and expectations other than religion, not so much.
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Old 07-11-2017, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Places you dream of
20,271 posts, read 12,137,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthmeetsSouth View Post
Truthfully, I doubt that most of the people moving to these 55 and older communities even realized that they are mostly white. I don't think that has anything to do with why people are moving there. I think that you get to a certain age and the idea of mowing a lawn isn't that appealing, but you aren't ready for a condo yet. And, if you have been busy working and running a business for the last umpteen years and haven't put much energy into developing a social life these places offer access to kids your own age to play with.
There may be certain cultural reasons why this lifestyle appeals more to whites than other ethnicities, but I don't think there is anything discriminatory going on there.
In Fl and I won't bet on that- there is a certain types of folks move into these communities- birds of a feather flock together- and politically they also beat the same drum-- I tried to rent in 2 communities, in the Clearwater area- never- ever again - I live in ORL with retirees all around me, near center of downtown- Chinese, Hispanic, Black and in between - boys, girls-and unknown- young old and I LOVE IT! my take is move to Central America- near ocean walkable easy life, no driving, as natural as I can get
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Old 07-11-2017, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Western Colorado
11,096 posts, read 12,485,180 times
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Where I live there's ranchers, potheads, hippies, farmers and bears. Pretty diverse if you ask me.
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Old 07-11-2017, 04:33 PM
 
11,145 posts, read 8,555,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Sol View Post
Honestly, no.

I want to retire to a clean, safe, and quiet community with friendly people. Most "diverse" communities do not fit the bill.
You're wrong.
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Old 07-11-2017, 06:02 PM
 
419 posts, read 257,530 times
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I live in Central Florida around a few retirement communities. The overwhelming majority of residents in them are from the north. These communities offered them the opportunity to buy small houses. Compare that to all-age communities that were only building mcmansions or older small home communities that were running down. These residents could spend much less money than in other new communities while having a safety factor. Plus, they had instant friends because they were from all over and didn't know anyone but their new neighbors. Some only snowbird but others love all of the activities so much that they sell their homes up north and move down here permanently.

Many are built around golf courses which holds great appeal to golfers, and they have their clubhouses with all types of activities many of these people have enjoyed all of their lives (cards, swimming, etc.) I see nothing wrong in communities that are built around common interests. They exclude no one who wants to join in, but it is a lifestyle many older whites know and like, so that's who you will mostly find there.

I can see the appeal, and although I'm old enough, I don't feel that I belong there -- at least not yet. It's fairly economical living with lots of amenities, but I still like being around people of all ages.
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Old 07-12-2017, 01:41 PM
 
234 posts, read 177,855 times
Reputation: 321
[quote=charlygal;48805307]You're wrong.[/QUOT

As a retired 30 year cop, he is correct. Although I live in L.A.
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Old 07-25-2017, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Flatland
28 posts, read 25,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seeriously View Post
I live in a boring, all-white, 55+ gated community that we currently have for sale. Hoping to go where there's diversity, the sound of playing children and the smell of life and living.
My feelings exactly. As far as I'm concerned, retirement communities are maybe one or two steps above a nursing home. They just feel stale and boring. I much prefer a place where people at different life stages live together. Young and old, couples with children and empty nesters. I love seeing children riding bicycles and playing on the street, since it makes the place feel alive.

Another issue I have with 55+ retirement communities is that, since they cater to a specific buyer market, they can also be harder to sell when the time inevitably comes to do that. For instance when the owners get too old to live on their own or die, and the heirs are stuck with selling the property. I believe a better alternative is a smaller, entry level home, perhaps with some upgrades made to it for older people's comfort, which should be much easier to sell years later.

Last edited by jabz1964; 07-25-2017 at 02:13 PM..
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Old 07-25-2017, 02:44 PM
 
Location: X marks the spot
697 posts, read 237,742 times
Reputation: 1197
When looking for a place to retire, safety is my first concern. I'd be happy in a 55+ community with amenities, diversity isn't really a concern for me.
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Old 07-25-2017, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Arizona
5,961 posts, read 5,312,463 times
Reputation: 18004
Quote:
Originally Posted by jabz1964 View Post
My feelings exactly. As far as I'm concerned, retirement communities are maybe one or two steps above a nursing home. They just feel stale and boring. I much prefer a place where people at different life stages live together. Young and old, couples with children and empty nesters. I love seeing children riding bicycles and playing on the street, since it makes the place feel alive.

Another issue I have with 55+ retirement communities is that, since they cater to a specific buyer market, they can also be harder to sell when the time inevitably comes to do that. For instance when the owners get too old to live on their own or die, and the heirs are stuck with selling the property. I believe a better alternative is a smaller, entry level home, perhaps with some upgrades made to it for older people's comfort, which should be much easier to sell years later.
You couldn't be more wrong. The most active old people flock to 55+ communities. Our homes sell in days.

You seem to be another one that thinks we lock the place up and can't leave.

Yep those people playing softball, running, playing tennis, racket ball, are just a step or two above a nursing home.
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