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Old 12-20-2015, 11:21 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
13,645 posts, read 8,559,902 times
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Has anyone else noticed this? Being retired with both of us at home is a lot cheaper than working.

It's not just the obvious things like the commute to work and maybe the working wardrobe, and lunches out. It's more than that.

We're still active and able. So no matter what has gone wrong around the house we can fix it ourselves. Painting, new commode, yard work, car maintenance within reason - all that stuff has become DIY for us.

We are trying one of those meal planning services. Ours sends us an email with the meals all planned, and a shopping list, too. Even though I don't cook, I (man) have assumed the grocery shopping responsibilities, and rarely buy anything that is not on the list. We are astounded how much the food cost has gone down. One reason it has gone down is that thee is very little waste/spoilage. If my shopping list calls for a head of cabbage, the meal planner has provisions for using the whole head during the week.

Being over 65 gave us a big deduction in taxes - both property taxes and income tax. And there are lots of other little ways it is cheaper to be retired and over 65.

Health care is still expensive when you take all the costs of Medicare and Supplemental Policy into account, but not as much as our still-working children pay. And our coverage is better, too. We pay about 500/month, and essentially have no deductible. That may not apply to everyone; some people have health problems that get expensive.

The whole thing has gotten us thinking about the value of a family having a stay-at-home person, especially when there are children involved. People we know where both adults work have to spend a lot more than we do, and cannot maintain their homes properly, either. I call it "taking care of business". Working people do not have enough time to "take care of business".
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Old 12-20-2015, 11:30 AM
 
4,477 posts, read 4,738,767 times
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There have been other threads addressing this same thing. Just do a search and find the replies.
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Old 12-20-2015, 11:46 AM
 
Location: AZ
484 posts, read 478,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
There have been other threads addressing this same thing. Just do a search and find the replies.
But that's no fun. Besides, you know how we retired folks like to repeat ourselves
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Old 12-20-2015, 11:50 AM
 
71,490 posts, read 71,652,652 times
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now that we are both home and free to whatever our costs are way higher .
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Old 12-20-2015, 12:12 PM
 
6,223 posts, read 4,718,283 times
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We saved a ton of money our first couple of years.....

No more income taxes or other payroll deductions. We sold the house and did RV traveling. No more $10k/year property taxes. No utilities. No mortgage, instead we made a nice return on investing our home equity. Food cost went down without buying lunches and also eating simpler. Fuel costs for the RV were about the same as my daily 70 mile round trip commute. With an absentee South Dakota residency, motor vehicle and health care insurance costs were low. We had no "entertainment" costs because our Senior Pass covered National Park admissions and there was not much else to spend money on. Clothing costs went to near zero.


I decided to retire when I realized that even at the top of my career I would be doing better financially if I retired.
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Old 12-20-2015, 01:49 PM
 
4,477 posts, read 4,738,767 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gbpakrfan View Post
But that's no fun. Besides, you know how we retired folks like to repeat ourselves




Yes, seems to be so common place. Repeat, repeat and repeat...again.
My reaction...


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Old 12-20-2015, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,726,438 times
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Default Retired - it's more expensive than working.

1. Car expense - I drive more now than when I was working, as I was lucky to have had a short commute.

2. Taxes - no property tax break here in California, and the additional federal tax exemption (negligible anyway) kicks in with age, not work status.

3. Clothing - business casual was what I used and still wear those clothes. No difference.

4. Do-it-yourself at home - I always did that sort of thing on weekends. No difference.

5. Travel - more time and flexibility to travel now than when I worked full time.

6. Cooking at home - I don't know how to cook and I don't like to cook, so no savings there.

7. Entertainment - More time and flexibility to do things = more money spent on doing them.

8. Medical - It's a wash (no difference).

9. Dental - I spend more money on dental care in retirement because now I have crappy dental insurance and before I had excellent employer-paid dental insurance.
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Old 12-20-2015, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Central IL
15,201 posts, read 8,509,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Listener2307 View Post

We are trying one of those meal planning services. Ours sends us an email with the meals all planned, and a shopping list, too. Even though I don't cook, I (man) have assumed the grocery shopping responsibilities, and rarely buy anything that is not on the list. We are astounded how much the food cost has gone down. One reason it has gone down is that thee is very little waste/spoilage. If my shopping list calls for a head of cabbage, the meal planner has provisions for using the whole head during the week.
Care to share your meal planning service? It sounds great and practical!
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Old 12-20-2015, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
1,886 posts, read 2,297,215 times
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Here's what I have found.

The first 2-5 years of retirement expenses go up because you are doing the things that you promised your self to do when you retire.

After that initial (doing things that you promised yourself) expenses come down. With the wife and myself both retired now for more then 10 years our expenses are less then when both of us worked.

After I retired from my full time I started working part time and had to quit because it was costing us to much money to continue working.

Before we retired we were driving 60,000 miles a year.
Now we drive a total of 8,000 miles a year.

Before we retired, if something broke I had to pay some one else to fix it because I did not have the time.
Now I fix everything at 10% of the cost.

Before both of us had to have work clothes, such as suits, and working wear for the wife.
Now, we wear what ever we want at a fraction of the cost.

Before we retired we purchased new cars because of the distances we traveled.
Now we have older cars and only have liability on them.

Before we retired we eat out at least 5 times a week because we didn't have time to cook.
Now we only eat out one time a week, and the home cooked food is better.

Before we retired one or both of us would stop after work to buy things before we went home.
Now that we are at home all the time we keep a list of things to get in town and only go in ounce a week.

Before we were retired we hesitated to buy from the internet because we were not home during the day.
Now since we are home we order stuff all the time and have several deliveries a week.

Before we were retired we planned and spent considerable money to go on vacations to get away from it all.
Now we have everything we want and don't want to go anywhere.
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Old 12-20-2015, 03:09 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,828 posts, read 18,832,665 times
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It's a wash for us. I had a five minute commute. I could wear somewhat casual clothes. I always cooked at home anyway.

But now I have time to look in thrift stores for a lot of things that I used to pay full price for. If we want photographic paper, for instance, for the printer, there's usually a nearly full pack of it in the thrift store. Tools? dhs get them in the TS. Break an old pyrex bowl? You can find a replacement cheaply in the TS. And high end quality clothing is just a few dollars. dh's down jacket would have cost about $400 but in the TS it was $10.00. He also enjoys North Face and L.L. Bean--you can't be the low TS prices.

But on the losing end is the expensive Medicare and the fact that now we are often home all day using electricity. Worst of all is being home all day, we require HEAT in winter. I can't turn the thermostat down low anymore most days.
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