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Old 12-23-2015, 12:06 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
Reputation: 32304

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
You mischaracterized what I said as well as made up things I supposedly said that I never said. I never said teachers don't put in more than clock hours, or that teachers get a 90K pension. I said teachers work about half the hours of someone that works in a corporate job over the course of the year and that I get picked up at 454 in the morning and dropped off at 1830 for 6 days a week and I don't get off for 3 weeks at Christmas and 3 months over the summer. I estimated teachers work about 200 days per year and some dedicated teachers do more...that was my estimate...how many days per year and hours per day do you believe the average teacher works? I also said considering the hours worked, hours off, and pension, the pay and benefits over a lifetime for teachers wasn't bad compensation and that's my opinion, you can provide a different perspective/opinion but that's my overall opinion.
First, I agree with your basic premise that we teachers do not get "bad compensation" considering the days worked per year, the pension, and other factors.

However, I hate to see exaggerations, even mild ones. In the California school district that I worked in for 34 years, we always got, and they still get, two weeks off for Christmas, not three. Also, I got, and they still get, two and a half months off over the summer, not three months. (And yes, that is a huge chunk of days off, so no need to exaggerate it). If we want to add in the one week of spring break, and the one week at Thanksgiving (I used to get two days but they've increased it), then we are up to three months off plus the two weeks at Christmas. So that makes 200 days about right, versus, say, about 250 days for a corporate job (365 days minus 104 weekend days minus 10 more days for two weeks of paid vacation equals roughly 250). Your personal work schedule is not typical for a corporate job - you work more.

As long as we've mentioned the pension, just a note that I contributed 8% of my salary towards it from day one of my employment.
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Old 12-23-2015, 01:35 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,673 times
Reputation: 19
If you have prepared financially for retirement, I believe that you will really enjoy it, after a short adjustment. There are too many other things to do in the world except have a structured job.
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Old 12-23-2015, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
17,628 posts, read 11,185,645 times
Reputation: 37672
I've retired twice, once for a year and a half and once for 3 years.........then I went back to work. Retirement was not good for me. It was at first, I was able to go to my shop and work on my cars, shop during the week, etc, but I found myself getting lazy. Some days I didn't even shave.

I would wake up at 11, hang out with the cats on the couch, watch some mindless TV, play on the computer, and not really do anything to stimulate my mind or get any exercise. Now, I am back working 5 days a week, feel better physically, and use my brain all day to solve problems.

For some people, retirement can be wonderful, just not for me.


Don
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Old 12-23-2015, 06:35 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,898 posts, read 42,143,850 times
Reputation: 43304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
First, I agree with your basic premise that we teachers do not get "bad compensation" considering the days worked per year, the pension, and other factors.

However, I hate to see exaggerations, even mild ones. In the California school district that I worked in for 34 years, we always got, and they still get, two weeks off for Christmas, not three. Also, I got, and they still get, two and a half months off over the summer, not three months. (And yes, that is a huge chunk of days off, so no need to exaggerate it). If we want to add in the one week of spring break, and the one week at Thanksgiving (I used to get two days but they've increased it), then we are up to three months off plus the two weeks at Christmas. So that makes 200 days about right, versus, say, about 250 days for a corporate job (365 days minus 104 weekend days minus 10 more days for two weeks of paid vacation equals roughly 250). Your personal work schedule is not typical for a corporate job - you work more.

As long as we've mentioned the pension, just a note that I contributed 8% of my salary towards it from day one of my employment.

My former system (where Mrs. NBP still works) has today through Jan. 3rd off, go back Monday the 4th, so 8 days.


Easter was similar (where I grew up in PA had Good Friday and Monday but also had the Monday after Thanksgiving and sometimes Tuesday for deer season).


Thanksgiving here used to be only Thursday and Friday, now it's Wednesday through Friday. We experimented a few years of having the kids off all week with teachers in for in-service Monday through Wednesday.


Summers usually run roughly 7 to 8 weeks, this year the first day for teachers was August 17th with the last day June 20th. If there are snow days, the make ups will be added at the end of year.


The students have 183 days with the rest for teachers being non-contact in service days (5 in August, a couple at the end of the year with 1 or 2 every month). The total teacher days are north of 190.
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Old 12-23-2015, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,552 posts, read 9,592,797 times
Reputation: 15801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
First, I agree with your basic premise that we teachers do not get "bad compensation" considering the days worked per year, the pension, and other factors.

However, I hate to see exaggerations, even mild ones. In the California school district that I worked in for 34 years, we always got, and they still get, two weeks off for Christmas, not three. Also, I got, and they still get, two and a half months off over the summer, not three months. (And yes, that is a huge chunk of days off, so no need to exaggerate it). If we want to add in the one week of spring break, and the one week at Thanksgiving (I used to get two days but they've increased it), then we are up to three months off plus the two weeks at Christmas. So that makes 200 days about right, versus, say, about 250 days for a corporate job (365 days minus 104 weekend days minus 10 more days for two weeks of paid vacation equals roughly 250). Your personal work schedule is not typical for a corporate job - you work more.

As long as we've mentioned the pension, just a note that I contributed 8% of my salary towards it from day one of my employment.
Yes there were some exaggerations in my estimates....my perception is based on my experience from looking at my work life versus several relatives and neighbors that were teachers. In my 37 years of working (post college), I would estimate that I worked that 250 day/yr schedule maybe only 3 or 4 years and the rest of the time, I worked well above that ( people in my company that only work a 40 hour workweek, don't advance). My wife also worked more than that estimate for at least half her career.
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Old 12-23-2015, 07:35 AM
 
7,801 posts, read 4,393,390 times
Reputation: 11594
All I fear I would miss in the structure and (small) sense of purpose and meaning it gives my life. You really must retire TO something and not just FROM something. Have a plan -- a long trip, a relocation, an avocation, a volunteer job, or part-time employment... Otherwise, you may just end up vegetating in front of the computer or TV for the rest of your life!
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Old 12-23-2015, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,744,100 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
All I fear I would miss in the structure and (small) sense of purpose and meaning it gives my life. You really must retire TO something and not just FROM something. Have a plan -- a long trip, a relocation, an avocation, a volunteer job, or part-time employment... Otherwise, you may just end up vegetating in front of the computer or TV for the rest of your life!
An important truth stated in few words.
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Old 12-23-2015, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
8,401 posts, read 9,148,021 times
Reputation: 13037
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
All I fear I would miss in the structure and (small) sense of purpose and meaning it gives my life. You really must retire TO something and not just FROM something. Have a plan -- a long trip, a relocation, an avocation, a volunteer job, or part-time employment... Otherwise, you may just end up vegetating in front of the computer or TV for the rest of your life!
For myself and others my job is not what gives/gave me a sense of purpose and meaning. I never identified as a Social Worker. My career was a good choice in that it gave me a secure job, flexible time off and health insurance and while it did not make me rich, the trade off of having a lifetime pension is very nice.
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Old 12-23-2015, 11:39 AM
 
186 posts, read 117,612 times
Reputation: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by augiedogie View Post
Ask yourself a few questions. Do you miss work on your days off? When you take a vacation, do you miss work and can't wait to get back. Do you wake up early the first morning back to work, in giddy joy because you get to go back to work? Do you even go in early, you love your job so much? By now you should know the answer.
This is stupid!

If you work you will enjoy the moments you are off work! You get some free days with a reason: everyone (or almost everyone) needs some days off to do some other stuff.

However if you retire you do not work anymore at all. Completely different.

Many people will mis working for many different reasons:

- Social contacts (you do not want to feed the people that retired and got into some sort of social isolation)

- the feeling of being "wanted" (to do certain stuff)

- the idea you are helping others/contributing to society

- feeling usefull

- making your own money, working for it, getting a bonus for a good job

- having targets (deadlines) , working towards them and making them

- using your brain (in jobs that require "thinking") to come up with novel ideas

- missing the regularity in life

- ....




Your post makes (for most people) no sense at all!


Many people will swear on monday, needing to go to work. Many will state they want a long holiday and yet most of them do want to go back to work.

I am not saying everyone is like that, but your post makes no sense.
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Old 12-23-2015, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Long Neck , DE
4,903 posts, read 3,036,093 times
Reputation: 8025
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
I feel sorry for you, if that is how you view (or are experiencing) retirement. All of my retired friends have things to do and places to go. Today, I have a music lesson at Noon and then an orientation at a local health club that I just joined. If I didn't have those two midday events I would be skiing. After I get over the Holidays, I plan to expand on my hobbies.

I plan to play at my church's midweek service. Volunteer with the National Forest Service. Join a local retiree club and my list will go on and on in time. Retirement is what you make of it.

I hope you continue to enjoy your retirement. I prefer to continue working. I have a much less stressful job now than I did when I was actually working. Each to his own.
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