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Old 12-23-2015, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Yavapai County
746 posts, read 481,954 times
Reputation: 923

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I was just thinking, Tall Traveler, today is now tomorrow...do you miss work yet?
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Old 12-23-2015, 04:17 PM
 
10,321 posts, read 9,372,412 times
Reputation: 15912
Miss work? Never!

Miss the paycheck? Yes
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Old 12-23-2015, 06:08 PM
 
7,980 posts, read 3,461,269 times
Reputation: 11230
Congratulations on your freedom. It's a good feeling that you don't have to work if you don't want to. You can sleep in everyday or get up early and go fishing. Enjoy your new life. Make the best of it. I retired late 50's.
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Old 12-23-2015, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Washington State
18,465 posts, read 9,561,235 times
Reputation: 15757
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbuglf View Post
I was just thinking, Tall Traveler, today is now tomorrow...do you miss work yet?
Nope. For my first day of retirement, I slept late after partying late, took a long nap, walked to the store for groceries, cleaned the apartment, and then helped my wife prepare dinner for a party of 6, then had a party at our house here in Peru.
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Old 12-23-2015, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Yavapai County
746 posts, read 481,954 times
Reputation: 923
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
Nope. For my first day of retirement, I slept late after partying late, took a long nap, walked to the store for groceries, cleaned the apartment, and then helped my wife prepare dinner for a party of 6, then had a party at our house here in Peru.
Sounds like a great start!
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Old 12-24-2015, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,658 posts, read 3,239,300 times
Reputation: 11917
I miss work as much as I miss having a root canal.
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Old 12-24-2015, 11:39 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,881 posts, read 42,096,122 times
Reputation: 43291
I'd miss it not at all except I keep getting staff emails (how they got my personal email address I haven't figured out) and notifications from various entities, like College Board, about missed deadlines.


I called College Board to let them know that I was retired and no longer involved and found out that no updates had been filed and I was the default contact.
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Old 12-24-2015, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Woodbury, MN
1,465 posts, read 1,532,247 times
Reputation: 1880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Oh, I have no particular quarrel with the reply you made; I don't agree with your designating me a "fat cat", but that's just a disagreement of perspective which I can accept. And as I said, it's all relative.

My Social Security is now up to $61 a month net (no, not a typo), after the deduction of the $105 per month Medicare Part B premium. Therefore the Social Security is negligible.

Yes, I have a paid-off condo, which helps the cash flow. My monthly condo fees are $325, which includes the water, the trash pick-up, the gardening service, the pool service, the insurance on the exterior of the building, and all maintenance and repair on the exterior of the building (painting, roofing, etc.). Those fees are going to have to go up soon, or we are going to have to have an assessment. The buildings are 35 years old and we try to keep them in good condition which is not cheap. I think the amount ($325) is quite reasonable considering what it covers, so I am explaining, not complaining.

So we are more in agreement than in disagreement about my "lot in life", as I am indeed very satisfied with it. The peace of mind is really great; I would have to go hog wild (designer clothes, fanciest restaurants, five-star hotels when traveling, a BMW or Mercedes in the garage, and so on) in order to have financial worries/budget problems, and since I don't desire any of the above I do have that peace of mind and I feel very fortunate. My eight-year-old Mazda Speed3 is in excellent mechanical shape and I will keep it for years to come yet; I have no need for newer/bigger/"better". (Just to cite the one example of the car).
I don't consider you to be a "fat cat" at all. As you said, you are comfortable, as long as you don't go crazy spending too much money. I don't understand how your social security is only $166 a month (before the $105 Medicare Part B premium). People that haven't worked a day in their life can get the supplemental social security, and get much more than that. I don't know if you could hit so hard by the WEP, Windfall Elimination Provision, where you lost most of your social security benefits.

You are taxed very heavily too, $14K, between the Federal and State income taxes. We pay several times as much as you do in taxes, and it is painful to see most of that tax money simply irresponsibly wasted by the government. I suppose being called a "fat cat" depends on the perspective of who sees you has a "fat cat". When I was poor, I used to see millionaires as being 'rich' or 'fat cats'. After passing by the first million in net worth, I don't see myself as 'rich' or a 'fat cat' at all. I'm not 'rich', but I am simply 'comfortable'. I could go out and buy new luxury cars to show off, but I don't do that. I drive a car that is over 10 years old.

If you don't mind saying, how could you get such a tiny social security check after working so many years and being a productive member of society?
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Old 12-24-2015, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,729,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davephan View Post
...........

If you don't mind saying, how could you get such a tiny social security check after working so many years and being a productive member of society?
Don't mind at all. My salary as a California public school teacher did not fall under Social Security at all because I was making mandatory contributions to the California State Teachers' Retirement System. Therefore, my earnings history under Social Security consisted only of part-time jobs while in college and various occasional moon-lighting and summer jobs during the 34 years of my teaching career. I just barely qualified to receive a Social Security retirement benefit at all, and I am completely satisfied with the justice and fairness of that situation, as my teacher's pension is better than the equivalent SS benefit would have been if the same salary had been subject to FICA withholding for the same 34 years. Of course my Calif. teachers' pension withholding rate was also somewhat higher (8% from my salary, 8% from the employer).
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Old 12-24-2015, 07:11 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,881 posts, read 42,096,122 times
Reputation: 43291
Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Don't mind at all. My salary as a California public school teacher did not fall under Social Security at all because I was making mandatory contributions to the California State Teachers' Retirement System. Therefore, my earnings history under Social Security consisted only of part-time jobs while in college and various occasional moon-lighting and summer jobs during the 34 years of my teaching career. I just barely qualified to receive a Social Security retirement benefit at all, and I am completely satisfied with the justice and fairness of that situation, as my teacher's pension is better than the equivalent SS benefit would have been if the same salary had been subject to FICA withholding for the same 34 years. Of course my Calif. teachers' pension withholding rate was also somewhat higher (8% from my salary, 8% from the employer).

Just so no one gets confused (false hope I know) CA is one of the few states (around 15) where they're not covered by Social Security. The vast majority are.


Why Aren


What's funny is that my deduction for pension was 7% (up from 5% several years ago) with about the same number of years and my amount is just a bit more than 1/2 of yours.


About that jump from 5% to 7%. The addition went to the General Fund and not the State Retirement System. It was called the "Teacher Tax" at the time.
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