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Old 12-26-2015, 07:43 AM
 
7,802 posts, read 4,395,350 times
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I thought teachers didn't earn Social Security? At least that's what teachers have always cited as the reason why their failing retirement system in this state demands more attention than that of just us lowly state workers...
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Old 12-26-2015, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Pac. NW
2,021 posts, read 1,524,358 times
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I retired at 48!

I'd planned to do all kinds of things leading up to it, but all I seemed to do was sit around. After a year I went back to work part-time and it's perfect. Couldn't be happier.
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Old 12-26-2015, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Midwest transplant
2,013 posts, read 4,997,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I thought teachers didn't earn Social Security? At least that's what teachers have always cited as the reason why their failing retirement system in this state demands more attention than that of just us lowly state workers...
In some states they can't collect both. Many states exempt employees from having to pay in to Social Security while they work for a state government agency and they pay a higher percentage of their working years salary into a state pension fund. I had SS taken out all the years I was working, in all 3 states in which I was employed, and all of the positions/jobs I had during my working years. I'm still paying into it while working part time~but at 15% because I'm now working as a subcontractor.
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Old 12-29-2015, 12:09 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,907 posts, read 42,154,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
You mischaracterized what I said as well as made up things I supposedly said that I never said. I never said teachers don't put in more than clock hours, or that teachers get a 90K pension. I said teachers work about half the hours of someone that works in a corporate job over the course of the year and that I get picked up at 454 in the morning and dropped off at 1830 for 6 days a week and I don't get off for 3 weeks at Christmas and 3 months over the summer. I estimated teachers work about 200 days per year and some dedicated teachers do more...that was my estimate...how many days per year and hours per day do you believe the average teacher works? I also said considering the hours worked, hours off, and pension, the pay and benefits over a lifetime for teachers wasn't bad compensation and that's my opinion, you can provide a different perspective/opinion but that's my overall opinion.

Three weeks at Christmas: Dec. 24th to Jan. 4th is 11 days. Wait you're right, it is 3 weeks (the days fall in parts of three different weeks).


Three months in the summer: June 18th or so to Aug. 12th is 7 weeks or so but is three months, too, since it's in parts of 3 different months.


You didn't say about the pension, but I dragged that in because you've been in those threads.


Your job was unusual and isn't a typical metric for most private employees. I worked in industry (labor and management) as well as the military.


In order of hours at work from lowest to highest was labor, management (not by much), teaching and military (and then only on deployment/cruise).


If you ask what my typical workday teaching was I'll tell you around 9.5 hours (I was tasked to go in an hour early to cover administrators who couldn't get their lazy asses in when they were supposed to) and typically parent conferences/planning/other tasks for an hour after official clock out most days.
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Old 12-29-2015, 12:12 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,907 posts, read 42,154,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
I thought teachers didn't earn Social Security? At least that's what teachers have always cited as the reason why their failing retirement system in this state demands more attention than that of just us lowly state workers...

Actually it's only about 15 states where teachers (as well as other government employees) aren't covered by SS.


Some of the pension problems for some states are rooted in the fact that they were either underfunded by the government (similar to some private pensions) or were treated as a piggybank by various Governors/Legislatures (the current issue in Maryland).
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Old 12-29-2015, 12:48 PM
 
Location: P.C.F
1,973 posts, read 1,644,682 times
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Work.... is/was not who or what I am .. Work was a Vehicle I used, for my desires to gain those material things I felt were important.. Yes I am retired .. Retired 3 weeks short of my 56 B-day.. Living in SWF in a waterfront pool home doing what I want when and IF I WANT TO..
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Old 12-30-2015, 03:56 AM
 
Location: Durham NC
1,190 posts, read 1,298,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Three weeks at Christmas: Dec. 24th to Jan. 4th is 11 days. Wait you're right, it is 3 weeks (the days fall in parts of three different weeks).


Three months in the summer: June 18th or so to Aug. 12th is 7 weeks or so but is three months, too, since it's in parts of 3 different months.


You didn't say about the pension, but I dragged that in because you've been in those threads.


Your job was unusual and isn't a typical metric for most private employees. I worked in industry (labor and management) as well as the military.


In order of hours at work from lowest to highest was labor, management (not by much), teaching and military (and then only on deployment/cruise).


If you ask what my typical workday teaching was I'll tell you around 9.5 hours (I was tasked to go in an hour early to cover administrators who couldn't get their lazy asses in when they were supposed to) and typically parent conferences/planning/other tasks for an hour after official clock out most days.
I don't have any idea what calendar they use in your neck of the woods but in NJ when I went to school teachers were off from c. June 20th till right after Labor Day. Not 3 months but way more than the 2 you suggested. They also had a couple of other vacation periods during the year.
I had some great teachers who were underpaid and had some that weren't worth much more than minimum wage.
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Old 12-30-2015, 04:07 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,907 posts, read 42,154,529 times
Reputation: 43310
Quote:
Originally Posted by lancers View Post
I don't have any idea what calendar they use in your neck of the woods but in NJ when I went to school teachers were off from c. June 20th till right after Labor Day. Not 3 months but way more than the 2 you suggested. They also had a couple of other vacation periods during the year.
I had some great teachers who were underpaid and had some that weren't worth much more than minimum wage.
We use the same calendar as in New Jersey. If you've been paying attention to various education threads the "3 months off" is in the dustbin for many areas, and has been for a couple decades.


I taught for over 30 years and never had a summer break longer than 9 weeks (which usually were taken up taking grad classes, none of which my system ever had any money to offer even partial reimbursement for).


And here's the thing about grad classes. You're required to take them. People in industry say they have to take them, also, but here's the difference. In industry continuing education gets you better pay (it does in education, too, but only in blocks of 15, 30, or 45 credits) and makes you more qualified when you look for another job. In education, the more post-grad you have the more expensive and unemployable you become if you want to change systems.
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Old 12-30-2015, 07:58 AM
 
8,092 posts, read 5,300,456 times
Reputation: 9246
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
So I plan to retire mañana still in my 50's but I am wondering if I will miss working. Making social connections not through work? Do people value you less if you don't work? What has been others experience?


For context, I've been working as a Consultant for an Engineering company and have worked all over the world and I don't know what a 40 hour work week is.
You can volunteer, join several meet-ups, go to a community college, etc if you want to make social connections...

I can't wait to retire so i can just concentrate on my hobbies (work in an office 2007 to present). I might just semi-retire and do Uber as a side gig. I met several Uber drivers who are retired and just do it as a side gig for extra $$.
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Old 01-04-2016, 10:09 AM
 
21 posts, read 14,608 times
Reputation: 92
I retired Dec 31 2015 and the first day I did not have to go to work was yesterday (Sunday).
I wish I could have retired sooner!
I was tired of my job, tired of commuting an hour each way. Tired of not having time to do things I
really wanted to do while "young" (61).

I will miss the people I worked with , but that's it. I can keep in touch with them and go out
to lunch with them if I want.

People do not think less of you if you retire, they are usually envious and ask how you managed to do it
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