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Old 12-28-2015, 08:17 PM
 
2,447 posts, read 2,097,795 times
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A wonderful program is coursera.org. Really take a look at the site and you will see hundreds of courses all topics.
It's all online courses, taught by professors at schools like Harvard, Duke, etc. It's not for credit but the courses are excellent.
I took 2, and you put forth the effort you want. Of course the more effort you put in, the more you will learn. but there is no pressure.
coursera.org
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Old 12-28-2015, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,558 posts, read 17,535,380 times
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Coursera is nice but mainly tech focused.

When I was at East TN State University, seniors over 65 were allowed to audit courses for free. I was in the social sciences department then and many seniors participated. Granted, this was roughly a decade ago, so who knows what programs like that are now.
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Old 12-28-2015, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, FL
2,636 posts, read 1,543,257 times
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Here in Virginia anyone over 60 can audit courses at the community colleges for free. I'm trying to decide between intros to macroeconomics or automotive engines for the upcoming semester.
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Old 12-28-2015, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,558 posts, read 17,535,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CapnTrips View Post
Here in Virginia anyone over 60 can audit courses at the community colleges for free. I'm trying to decide between intros to macroeconomics or automotive engines for the upcoming semester.
If you want to parlay the knowledge into any type of marketable skill for maybe a part time business, engines is the no brainer. I am an economics major, and an average person can easily teach themselves basic to moderate level macroeconomics with nothing but a textbook, paper for the math, and Google.
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Old 12-28-2015, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,081 posts, read 22,924,480 times
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These types of classes and lectures are what I really miss since moving to the boonies. But, I'm learning other things. I do miss a classroom experience, but I've got a bunch of projects lined up to redecorate and reorganize my teeny little studio apartment. Just tonight I watched videos on how to use chalk paint and wax. I can't wait to try out the techniques on my non-matching furniture. I've been meaning to paint them for years.

I'm also going to learn how to decoupage the boring clear plastic bins that are on open shelves. And I'm finally getting ready to turn my big old dresser into a workbench. And I'm going to paint it, too with layers of colors and distress it, etc. Or give it a try anyway.

I figure if I just keep busy, and learning and trying new things, it will help take the place of taking classes.

Also, I've become friendly with my neighbors, and all of them are artistic in their own ways. I had two neighbor ladies in here today helping me figure out how to turn my dresser into a workbench. I joked with the guy at Home Depot, who cut some plywood for me, that there were 3 old ladies staring at my dresser figuring out how to do it LOL.

Anyway, I'm jealous of your classes, but you can learn a lot on Youtube and even from your neighbors, if you live in the boonies :-)
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Old 12-28-2015, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,672 posts, read 33,671,635 times
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We have a lot of scientists and engineers in my town because of 2 large facilities here and contractors that work with them. What I think is nice about our program is that when those people retire, if they stay in the area, they aren't entirely cut off from their professional associations/communications/news/knowledge once they leave the job like so many retirees are who did important or intellectually stimulating work. For example, this coming semester we have the following Science/Technology class offerings:

"The Evolution and Applications of Stainless Steels" taught by a Distinguished Research Staff Member of the Processing and Joining Group of the Materials Science and Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with over 30 years of industrial and national laboratory research experience in metallurgy and materials science.

"Perspectives on ITER" (ITER is the crown jewel of the international fusion power program using magnetically confined plasma) taught by the Chief Engineer for the U.S. ITER Project Office, a retiree who worked on the project here and in DC, someone who directed the International Space Station effort in NASA's Office of Space Operations and is now is the Director of Communications for ITER, Someone who worked in the ITER Integrated Modelling Section in france then came back here when he retired, and someone who currently leads pellet system design activities for the U.S. ITER Project Office at the national laboratory. It's a 5 session course and I imagine each will teach one session.

"The Tina Riedinger Memorial Lectures on Renewable Energy Strategies" taught by someone who led a program of experimental studies of nuclear structure at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility at the national labi, worked on the staff of a US Senator and ORNL for many years and then was the national lab's Deputy Director for Science and Technology.

"The Life and Death of Stars" taught by an instructor in physics and mathematics at the U. S. Naval Nuclear Power School and as a consultant with the Nuclear Science and Technology Division at the national lab.

"The Birth of Quantum Mechanics" taught by a PhD in Physics, now retired. He lists his retirement hobby as recreational mathematics.

"Critical Resources for Sustaining a Developed Civilization" taught by a university professor of geology.

"New Happenings with Thermoelectric Materials" taught by the leader of the Mechanical Properties and Mechanics Group at the national lab.

There is also a technical book discussion group.

The point is while I may be in the film class or one of the history classes, the retired scientists and engineers are still being stimulated in their given professional areas of expertise and interest with others just like them. I think that makes the transition to retirement less difficult for them. They aren't "shut out" intellectually once retired. As you can see, the science classes are not fluff.

Last edited by LauraC; 12-28-2015 at 11:57 PM..
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Old 12-29-2015, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,962 posts, read 3,452,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
If you want to parlay the knowledge into any type of marketable skill for maybe a part time business, engines is the no brainer. I am an economics major, and an average person can easily teach themselves basic to moderate level macroeconomics with nothing but a textbook, paper for the math, and Google.
Some, if not most, of us just want to learn for leanings sake. We're not thinking of part time jobs or losing our freedom to a paycheck again. We just want to learn because.
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Old 12-29-2015, 12:16 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,828 posts, read 18,832,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meo92953 View Post
Some, if not most, of us just want to learn for leanings sake. We're not thinking of part time jobs or losing our freedom to a paycheck again. We just want to learn because.
Agree. We've already had our careers. Now many of us would like to study something we love. Maybe it would be what we always wanted to study but never could because we had to study something that would get us a real job. I don't live near any place where I could take a class but maybe someday I'll live closer to a place where I could take art classes. That's what I always wanted to do.
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Old 12-29-2015, 06:13 AM
 
Location: Tampa Bay`. ><((((>.`><((((>
4,503 posts, read 6,575,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mayvenne View Post
A wonderful program is coursera.org. Really take a look at the site and you will see hundreds of courses all topics.
It's all online courses, taught by professors at schools like Harvard, Duke, etc. It's not for credit but the courses are excellent.
I took 2, and you put forth the effort you want. Of course the more effort you put in, the more you will learn. but there is no pressure.
coursera.org
This sounds like a winner too.
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Old 12-29-2015, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
126 posts, read 138,058 times
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If you are just interested in learning and not to get credits or a degree, there are many free or low-cost classes offered on line from different organizations and universities. Most of them do provide a certificate of completion. Check out:


MIT OpenCourseWare | Free Online Course Materials
https://www.edx.org/
https://www.udacity.com/
https://novoed.com/
https://www.canvas.net/
https://www.coursera.org/
https://www.udemy.com/


More complete lists can be seen by Googling "MOOC" (Massive Open Online Course), for example:
https://www.coursesites.com/webapps/...occatalog.html


I've participated in several different classes, both in and out of my field. I'm enrolled in Udemy now, taking a web development class. Also, if you're interested in GIS (Geospatial Information Systems), Penn State University has made several lessons open source for any one to use. One of them:
https://www.e-education.psu.edu/natureofgeoinfo/
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