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Old 12-30-2015, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Tampa Bay`. ><((((>.`><((((>
4,503 posts, read 6,577,179 times
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Originally Posted by seeriously View Post
LIFE is continuously teaching me. I spent 2 & 1/2 hours on the phone with comcast yesterday installing a new modem. Luckily I hit on a good tech and he walked me through the setup and then together we got the desktop, the tablet, two smartphones, an ipod, the tv and printer on board. Today I got a new wireless adapter card and installed that. Always learning!
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Old 12-30-2015, 07:53 AM
 
6,239 posts, read 4,725,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohnonothimagain View Post
I love the idea of education being offered to Seniors so they too can continue to learn more. Yet all that education is for naught if someone 50-60-70 years of age cannot find work so they can make use of the knowledge and education.........
I think it is sad that many people equate learning with developing skills to help them find work. Many of us want to learn about our world and want to develop skills we did not have time for. We just do not like being ignorant but want to gain knowledge beyond our limited experience.


For many fat, dumb and happy is a way of life. Personally I am too restless and curious to live that way. I spend a great deal of my time learning new things and developing new skills. I always have and hope to be able to continue to do so into the future. I also found that when I did work, most of what I learned that seemed to have nothing to do with my career proved to be more valuable than my technical skills.
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Old 12-30-2015, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,682 posts, read 33,681,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yourown2feet View Post
Why let this bother you? It's fun to be around young people. When I was in undergraduate school, there was a small handful of students over age 50 in my classes. The rest of us treated them just like any other student (well, with one exception: we weren't hitting on them, LOL)
When I attended community college, I took 3 hour classes that met once a week at night. I was working full time during the day and I was an adult. It meant I could take 4 classes a week at night and still have the weekend to get my homework done which typically involved a lot of reading. When I transferred to the university, although they claimed they had an adult learning program, the adult student was the ugly stepchild. There were no 3 hour classes that met once a week. You had to take evening classes that met M/W or Tu/Th for an hour and a half each which meant that if you were assigned something on a Monday, for example, you had to complete it by Wednesday, hard to do when you are working full time and in other classes on Tuesday night. Same goes for homework assignments on Tuesday that had to be done by Thursday. To take 4 classes a week, you had to take two classes per night, four days per week after a full day at work. I asked why the university did this at night and I was told 18 year olds don't have the attention span for a 3 hour class so they didn't offer any.

They also offered majors in their so-called Continuing Education program. I had a major offered in that program where a required class met at 3:00P. I had to take time off from work for the midterm and the final and had to arrange to have the lectures tape recorded for me. I then sat in some office and took notes from the tape. They missed two. I was out of luck.

But my favorite was the entrance essay where you had to take a position from their choice of topics and make a cogent argument for your position. The purpose was to determine if any incoming students needed remedial no credit classes. This was my choice of subjects:

Co-Ed dorms
Drinking on Campus
Something to do with meal tickets (campus cafeteria).

Considering adult learners don't live in the dorms and are not likely to drink at the campus hang out or have a meal ticket, I bs-ed my way through Drinking on Campus. But once again you can see that no one considered the transferring adult student.

And although it didn't apply to me at the time, you try to get up from those half-desks attached to the chair when you have arthritis, a bum knee or some mobility issue. In my current retiree program we sit on adjustable desk chairs on wheels at tables not desks. We have our own classrooms because the rest of the college has regular classroom furniture. Our larger classes meet in a lecture hall/auditorium. Three years ago, they put railings on the stairs (for us).
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Old 12-30-2015, 10:22 AM
 
479 posts, read 399,417 times
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Yeah, that's a bummer. In the (state-funded) school where I learned alongside some Old students, we had a teenaged student with dwarfism who walked with 2 crutches, a young blind student with a cane (no dog), a 20-year-old who was getting chemo, and probably others who've slipped my memory. There were no ADA accommodations back then. We did what we could, to help or at least not get in their way, and it was painful to watch them manage the movements they had to make, including stairs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
you try to get up from those half-desks attached to the chair when you have arthritis, a bum knee or some mobility issue. In my current retiree program we sit on adjustable desk chairs on wheels at tables not desks. We have our own classrooms because the rest of the college has regular classroom furniture. Our larger classes meet in a lecture hall/auditorium. Three years ago, they put railings on the stairs (for us).
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Old 01-01-2016, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,732,288 times
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As a life-long learner with many interests I think it's fantastic how so many posters in this thread have found opportunities to pursue learning in formal or semi-formal settings.

Personally I have satisfied my desire for continued learning by reading - not escapist reading of course, but various kinds of serious non-fiction. Nor is my interest limited to non-fiction; I have undertaken a search for excellent quality fiction suitable for reading aloud to fifth graders, which I do as part of my volunteer work. For I still enjoy good fiction even if I no longer read much fiction; I just checked out "The Brothers Karamazov" by Dostoevsky from the library (nothing to do with fifth graders, for sure!), which I had read in college and have begun re-reading it (800 pages of pretty small print). I'm surprised how much of it I had forgotten.

So my path to on-going intellectual stimulation has been a solitary one - just one of many paths.
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Old 01-02-2016, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
34,682 posts, read 33,681,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
As a life-long learner with many interests I think it's fantastic how so many posters in this thread have found opportunities to pursue learning in formal or semi-formal settings.

Personally I have satisfied my desire for continued learning by reading - not escapist reading of course, but various kinds of serious non-fiction. Nor is my interest limited to non-fiction; I have undertaken a search for excellent quality fiction suitable for reading aloud to fifth graders, which I do as part of my volunteer work. For I still enjoy good fiction even if I no longer read much fiction; I just checked out "The Brothers Karamazov" by Dostoevsky from the library (nothing to do with fifth graders, for sure!), which I had read in college and have begun re-reading it (800 pages of pretty small print). I'm surprised how much of it I had forgotten.

So my path to on-going intellectual stimulation has been a solitary one - just one of many paths.
It doesn't have to be totally solitary. You could join a book discussion group, too. I've been in mine for over 8 years now. It's nonfiction but there is also a fiction group, a classics group and a technical group. It meets once a month and it's associated with the retiree program I previously mentioned. Last month we read a book about an internment camp in Texas during WWII and this month we are reading a book about Kim Philby, who worked for British Intelligence while spying for the Russians during the cold war. We vote on what we read. My group also goes out to lunch after we meet for people who want to/can go.
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Old 01-02-2016, 09:27 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
As a life-long learner with many interests I think it's fantastic how so many posters in this thread have found opportunities to pursue learning in formal or semi-formal settings.

Personally I have satisfied my desire for continued learning by reading - not escapist reading of course, but various kinds of serious non-fiction. Nor is my interest limited to non-fiction; I have undertaken a search for excellent quality fiction suitable for reading aloud to fifth graders, which I do as part of my volunteer work. For I still enjoy good fiction even if I no longer read much fiction; I just checked out "The Brothers Karamazov" by Dostoevsky from the library (nothing to do with fifth graders, for sure!), which I had read in college and have begun re-reading it (800 pages of pretty small print). I'm surprised how much of it I had forgotten.

So my path to on-going intellectual stimulation has been a solitary one - just one of many paths.
I read a lot of Dostoevsky in high school, I did take World literature, so I need to revisit and read this author again.
But for immediate need, like in the next 6 months. I'm going to learn Italian and German, if somebody yells fire, I should know and get out quickly.
My husband is probably going to do the MIT courseware, he likes anything technical.
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Old 01-03-2016, 05:41 AM
 
2,449 posts, read 2,099,772 times
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I just wanted to add that coursera.org has ALL sorts of courses. Someone said it is mostly tech courses? Well, I honestly don't know if that's true but I have zero interest in tech courses and have taken two wonderful social psychology/economics courses that I enjoyed a lot. I would have enjoyed them even more if I put more time and effort into them.
Again the really nice thing is that you watch the lectures whenever you feel like it.

The one I really loved (and I believe it is to be offered again) was by Dan Ariely - A beginner's guide to irrational behavior. He has written books about this and also writes a column in Wall Street Journal.
Very interesting but the course was extremely entertaining.
To the person who said they were interested in reupholstery and the like, I am sure you can find many videos on youtube. I dont usually think of it but my 30 yo daughter said she is constantly looking up how to videos on youtube and finds it extremely helpful.
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Old 01-03-2016, 06:24 AM
 
12,686 posts, read 14,071,402 times
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When I was retired in the U.S. I took a seminar in creative writing for three years, a course in Irish, I did clinical intakes with an AIDS organization, a retreat at a Zen center, and a few discussion groups for seniors at a community center. After emigrating from the U.S. most opportunities in the countries I lived in were in the local language and I wouldn't have understood. At that point I picked up reading subjects I'd been interested in in the past or re-reading old favorites to see what I thought about them now...and I started taking photos when I went out for a drive or walking in the country. I've lived in two countries, and in each one I have spent a fair amount of time reading books on their history and culture.
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Old 01-03-2016, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,732,288 times
Reputation: 32304
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
It doesn't have to be totally solitary. You could join a book discussion group, too. I've been in mine for over 8 years now. It's nonfiction but there is also a fiction group, a classics group and a technical group. It meets once a month and it's associated with the retiree program I previously mentioned. Last month we read a book about an internment camp in Texas during WWII and this month we are reading a book about Kim Philby, who worked for British Intelligence while spying for the Russians during the cold war. We vote on what we read. My group also goes out to lunch after we meet for people who want to/can go.
Yes, an excellent suggestion for people like me. I am aware of book discussion groups, and of course they have the additional merit of providing social interaction. The reason I have not yet sought one out is that I have scheduled volunteer activities three days a week plus an HOA board meeting once a month which requires a lot of preparation on my part, so I don't wish to add anything more to my schedule.
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