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Old 01-03-2016, 12:26 AM
 
20 posts, read 17,096 times
Reputation: 25

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You're right. The section 8 and similar programs are little more than a cruel joke for those that need them. As far as GA goes Atlanta is too expensive and crime ridden. Rural Ga might be cheap but not a city. And ur right many posters do not investigate what they read on the net.

 
Old 01-03-2016, 12:52 AM
 
20 posts, read 17,096 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
Oh man, are you ever in for a rough collision with the reality of life as a low income retiree in the US today. If you want a region with mild winters that pretty much means the red states in the southern part of the country. Red states outright hate the poor and they don't care what you may have done before you retired because now you are just another worthless old person who can make no contribution to society. Don't believe me? Try looking up housing assistance and medicare/medicaid in states like Alabama and Georgia. And before all the Southerners around here jump all over me, I'm originally from the South myself, so I know where-of I speak. I am disgusted by the bigotry and lack of compassion displayed all too often by my (once) fellow Southerners. I now live in Colorado for good reason.

Your other possibility might be southern California. It's warm there, and as far as I can tell they seem to try to help their low income residents more than many other states do. But I know very little about Cali, so I can't make many helpful suggestions about the towns there. But one thing you should keep in mind is that places with mild winters often have hot summers and global warming is for reals, like it or not. Elderly people who can't afford AC die in heat waves in this country every summer. So, it may come down to a choice of which is the lesser evil.

If you want to consider Colorado, I can tell you what its like here. Colorado's winters are actually not that bad as long as you stay away from towns in the high mountains which you'd be staying away from anyhow, since these towns are mostly over priced resorts and your rent would be more like $400/day - not a month. Colorado Springs might be a good fit for you. Housing prices there are very reasonable, and you might find a studio apartment for as low as $400/month. But even there, that $400/month is a real deal breaker for most everywhere you might want to live. Sounds to me that if $400 is all you can afford, you need to get busy searching for subsidized housing through the department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HUD housing is not all sleazy projects the way some people think. HUD has some very nice apartments that they run for low income seniors in cities and towns all across the US. In fact, a major reason that I moved to my current town was because there was an opening in the senior apartments here. HUD keeps its housing for seniors immaculate and in excellent repair. People are not allowed to get away with stuff like making loud noise all night long or filling their studio apartment with 637 feral cats, etc., etc.

If its important to you to live in a climate more like the one you're coming from, and you're willing to deal with life below the Mason Dixon Line, google the words "HUD," "senior housing," and the name of the city you want - "Atlanta," for example, and you'll be rewarded with links to the websites of those housing authorities which manage these type apartments. I warn you that you'll have to do some searching and calling around (can you do that from the Philippines?), because congress in its vast wisdom has started withdrawing funding from all HUD programs. I guess the theory is that if us old people are all forced out on the streets we'll either die from hypothermia come winter and any survivors will be finished off by the 120 degree heat wave next summer. Bingo! Social (in)Security problem solved. However, at this point, if you make it your job to search for HUD senior housing everywhere you can think of, you'll probably luck into an opening the way I did. But hurry, cuz it's getting harder by the day. BTW, the senior apartments I moved to have informal get-to-gethers often where we don't dance (alas), but we did a lot of gossipping and card games, and even wine imbibing for those so inclined.

I am an advocate for low income and disabled people in Colorado, so if you wish, you can DM me with some more of the specifics of your situation and I can point you toward more precise places to get some help. I wish you the best of luck. I'm afraid you're going to need it.

Yours,
Rambler
Thanks for your educated reply. Everytime I've checked Hud/sec 8/low income openings it's the same: places in the middle of nowhere,years long waiting lists, huge amount of red tape. It's really just so much BS. And you're right about the South-very hard to get help there I think. I am much happier in the Philippines so I might just exhaust my savings on Medical here and then just off myself. Much better than paying some slumlord outrageous rent for a rathole. Only in inland Southern Ca it might be possible & SCal is not noted for it's compassion either. Co Springs is a nice conservative small city with too much rain,but might be a possibility. I cancelled a job interview there after it rained 24 hours straight for 3 days.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 01:23 AM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
5,018 posts, read 3,515,771 times
Reputation: 10645
Before you do that, I live in a senior building & pay $335 per month. The minus is that there is definitely winter & where I live is 9 miles from grocery stores & Dr's.

But, it's a thought.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 05:03 AM
 
Location: R.I.
1,028 posts, read 627,494 times
Reputation: 4436
Quote:
Originally Posted by miczmehandl View Post
Retired human services professional, returning to U.S. from Philippines cuz my Medicare is no good here. I am poor due to health problem (but I am not stupid, uneducated,nor low class) In researching there are very few places I can afford to rent even a room in USA. I need helpful suggestions from smart people here. To be brief, I need to find a medium to large city with the following: 1) abundance of studio apt or room rentals no more than $400/mo in tenant friendly city 2) not cold winters,if things go bad I don't want to freeze to death 3) good public transport-would rather not get a car. 4) Singles dances where I can meet 40-60 year old ladies 5) Quality doctors who accept Medicare with good access to specialists. Thanks.
Stockton, CA has a large population of people from the Philippines, and you may want do some additional research on the Filipino Plaza located in Stockton. Here is a brief description of it I found on the net.

Filipino Plaza
The Filipino Plaza is an apartment complex that offers housing for low income families. The Filipino Plaza also offers easy access to a bus, comfortable housing, three laundry rooms, planned social activities for residents, a recreation room, transportation for scheduled medical appointments, and planned excursions. The Filipino plaza was built in 1972 to give housing to displaced Filipino families after many of Little Manila's neighborhoods were bulldozed in an attempt to improve downtown Stockton.

Also located in this Plaza are several Philippine organizations that may be able to assist you with your relocation needs.

Good Luck
 
Old 01-03-2016, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Cochise County, AZ
1,326 posts, read 850,570 times
Reputation: 2889
Quote:
Originally Posted by miczmehandl View Post
Thanks for your educated reply. Everytime I've checked Hud/sec 8/low income openings it's the same: places in the middle of nowhere,years long waiting lists, huge amount of red tape. It's really just so much BS.
Sorry but in my opinion, your reply is the standard BS that is spouted much too often by people who don't even try!

I recently moved to southeastern Arizona and had no problem at all in finding available low-income housing in not just one community but several. Yes, I am saying there were low-income apartments available for immediate rental!

Guess you consider southeastern Arizona the middle of nowhere but if you do, then you are making a huge mistake. Looking at the Social Serve website (for which I've already provided you a link), I found a 3 bedroom in Sierra Vista and rents range from $169 for 20% of income qualification to $460 for 40% of income qualification. As you'll see from the facebook page that I linked the 3 bedroom is available for immediate rental. Sierra Vista has +40K residents and a great hospital.

Quit assuming the worst and start doing some research yourself.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 09:14 AM
 
2,635 posts, read 3,402,181 times
Reputation: 6978
You're asking a lot, and seem to be quite impatient.

Why not just get on a few waiting lists now, and work on your attitude a little. Many people are trying to help and have given you good suggestions here. Maybe you don't get your first choice when you first move back to the states.

Poor, educated and sick, and over 65 years old ...... and looking for a woman in her 40's-50's. Yeah....

Beggars cannot be choosers, my friend.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Deep In The Heart of Texas
1,614 posts, read 1,283,158 times
Reputation: 3052
I was reading thru the classifieds and saw 2 ads for private rooms in a home for $375 a month utilities included. Can't beat that and they were in a good part of town. As for HUD housing, here the rentals have to pass inspection and they surely can't be rat holes! Yes you have to wait a long time but paying only 1/3 of your income for rent is well worth it. When applying you can check the option to find your rental yourself, rather than moving into a building of all section 8 tenants. Private landlords that is. Rents have gone thru the roof recently!
 
Old 01-03-2016, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Deep In The Heart of Texas
1,614 posts, read 1,283,158 times
Reputation: 3052
If you wanted to get on the list for section 8 housing vouchers you need to check frequently if they are open to taking new applications.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Deep In The Heart of Texas
1,614 posts, read 1,283,158 times
Reputation: 3052
Quote:
Originally Posted by miczmehandl View Post
Retired human services professional, returning to U.S. from Philippines cuz my Medicare is no good here. I am poor due to health problem (but I am not stupid, uneducated,nor low class) In researching there are very few places I can afford to rent even a room in USA. I need helpful suggestions from smart people here. To be brief, I need to find a medium to large city with the following: 1) abundance of studio apt or room rentals no more than $400/mo in tenant friendly city 2) not cold winters,if things go bad I don't want to freeze to death 3) good public transport-would rather not get a car. 4) Singles dances where I can meet 40-60 year old ladies 5) Quality doctors who accept Medicare with good access to specialists. Thanks.


Sounds like you have an income issue...try to bring in more income and forget singles dances until you can support yourself. Shouldn't even been on your list of "need to have"
 
Old 01-03-2016, 10:37 AM
 
3,006 posts, read 2,736,418 times
Reputation: 5725
There are a couple of posters from Vegas in this thread, but no invitations to move there. I have heard that living in Vegas is cheap, there is a fast growing retirement community there, and there is available low income subsidized housing for seniors in decent areas. You should check into it.

My suggestions are Columbia, SC, Athens, GA, Tallahassee, FL, Tuscaloosa, AL, and Iowa City, Iowa. All are university cities with a decent amount of culture (2 are state capitals), good health care, and reasonably priced housing for grad students. I think you would be particularly happy in Columbia as the weather is mild and there is a good amount of culture for a city its size.
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