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Old 01-03-2016, 10:42 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,752 posts, read 4,385,485 times
Reputation: 10414

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Quote:
Originally Posted by miczmehandl View Post
Thanks for your educated reply. Everytime I've checked Hud/sec 8/low income openings it's the same: places in the middle of nowhere,years long waiting lists, huge amount of red tape. It's really just so much BS. And you're right about the South-very hard to get help there I think. I am much happier in the Philippines so I might just exhaust my savings on Medical here and then just off myself. Much better than paying some slumlord outrageous rent for a rathole. Only in inland Southern Ca it might be possible & SCal is not noted for it's compassion either. Co Springs is a nice conservative small city with too much rain,but might be a possibility. I cancelled a job interview there after it rained 24 hours straight for 3 days.
Oh my! That rain you experienced in Colorado Springs was a highly unusual event. Usually, Colorado Springs gets a little rain in the summer from convective clouds pushing up against the mountains and causing scattered thunderstorms that might last for 20 or 30 minutes. Most days Colorado Springs gets no rain at all. Average rainfall in the Springs is around 16 inches compared to a US city average of 37 inches. Colorado Springs does get snow, however - an average of about 41 inches a year. But there's a saving grace - thanks to the arid climate there, the snow usuallly sublimes more than it melts - climatologists call it "sublimation" when frozen water just evaporates off into the sky instead of first melting before it evaporates. This means that you can get a nice fluffy snow storm in Colorado Springs and the next day is all sunshine and blue skies and most of the snow just vanishes. Poof! I always enjoyed watching this phenomenon when I lived there (I grew up in the Springs).

In addition, finding a place on your own without having to depend on subsidized housing is much more do-able in Colorado Springs. I checked padmapper and found rentals for a one bedroom house for $475 in a decent part of town and another for an one bedroom apartment for $499 in a VERY nice area. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. When I lived in Colorado Springs, I found my places to live just by cruising the neighborhoods I liked and keeping an eye peeled for the inevitable FOR RENT signs. In addition, University Hospital, Colorado's outstanding and nationally recognized medical center, is only about a 60 to 90 minute drive away in Denver. In Colorado Springs itself, you can get excellent care from Penrose/ St. Francis Hospital. I was very satisfied with the treatment I received for my disability there. Truth be told, I'm seriously considering going back home to the Springs to live out the rest of my days. While I love the beauty and remoteness of SW Colorado, there are very few amenities here and the local hospital sucks. The main thing that's holding me back is figuring out how to raise the money for the 400 mile trip back with rented U-Haul and coming up with the $$$ for damage deposit and possibly first and last month's rent. I suggest you give Colorado Springs some deeper consideration unless you are just flat out opposed to the occasional winter snow storm.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deelighted View Post
Sorry but in my opinion, your reply is the standard BS that is spouted much too often by people who don't even try!

I recently moved to southeastern Arizona and had no problem at all in finding available low-income housing in not just one community but several. Yes, I am saying there were low-income apartments available for immediate rental!

Guess you consider southeastern Arizona the middle of nowhere but if you do, then you are making a huge mistake. Looking at the Social Serve website (for which I've already provided you a link), I found a 3 bedroom in Sierra Vista and rents range from $169 for 20% of income qualification to $460 for 40% of income qualification. As you'll see from the facebook page that I linked the 3 bedroom is available for immediate rental. Sierra Vista has +40K residents and a great hospital.

Quit assuming the worst and start doing some research yourself.
*sigh*

I am getting very frustrated with some of the links people have been giving on this thread. I did exactly as you instructed and clicked on your facebook link for Sierra Vista. I read down the page and saw lots of happy messages from the Sierra Vista complex, nice pix, and the ad for the 3 bedroom apartments. But nowhere could I find where they said just what the apartments rent out for. Where did you find the info on the $169.00 rental price? I'm mystified. I guess I'll trying going back in the thread and find your other post where you gave the link for the Social Service website. I'll get back to you.

OK, I found it. I must admit that I am completely ignorant of what ďMedian Income Based RentĒ actually is about. Their definition:

A combination of both Income Restricted and Income Based Sliding Scale; the property has specific restrictions to rent to tenants whose income is no more than a specific percentage of HUD's Median Family Income [MFI] values for the region. This feature can list a range of incomes and their corresponding monthly rent values. For example, if the tenant makes between 30% and 40% of the MFI, then they might have to pay $316 per month. But if they make between 40% and 50%, then they would have to pay $360 per month.


AND I found where you got the $169.00 amount for rent, too:

% M.I. Rent
20% $169
30% $315
40% $460
50% $605
60% $751
Fair Market Rate $910

($300) damage deposit

I just checked out HUDís website and I see that that median income based rent is a feature of HUDís public housing program (the one they abolished in Atlanta, BTW). I have that rarest of government documents, a section 8 voucher which is under a different set of rules. You learn something new everyday. Now THIS link of yours I like because it lays out the facts and numbers very nicely. Thanks. As a matter of fact, I think I may just do some double checking with them by calling the numbers for the Colorado Springs site on Monday. I know that town like the back of my hand and Iíll know straight off whatever they may or may not be up to.

Last edited by Colorado Rambler; 01-03-2016 at 11:22 AM..

 
Old 01-03-2016, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,583,592 times
Reputation: 16777
Quote:
Originally Posted by lenora View Post
If you are eligible for Medicare you are either 65 + or disabled. Look into Subsidized Housing - especially Subsidized Senior Housing if you are 62 or over. There are some VERY nice apartments out there. Most have a waiting list, some have none.

HUD-Multifamily Housing - Inventory of Elderly/Handicapped Units
Out in California I was on SSI. I rented rooms until I got on the list, and eventually got an apartment. I paid about 250 a month. It was hard to find good places if you were at the basic level though, or you didn't want to be in a bad area. Less crowded areas are easier.

If you're interested in an area, first step would be to get your name on the list. You can check how long the wait is as well. One option if you need temperary housing is to rent a room. Just make sure to ask lots of questions and trust your judgement. Room renters are also usually not expected to stay for any set time, so there is no rental agreement or least involved.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Cochise County, AZ
1,324 posts, read 840,911 times
Reputation: 2874
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
*sigh*

I am getting very frustrated with some of the links people have been giving on this thread. I did exactly as you instructed and clicked on your facebook link for Sierra Vista. I read down the page and saw lots of happy messages from the Sierra Vista complex, nice pix, and the ad for the 3 bedroom apartments. But nowhere could I find where they said just what the apartments rent out for. Where did you find the info on the $169.00 rental price? I'm mystified. I guess I'll trying going back in the thread and find your other post where you gave the link for the Social Service website. I'll get back to you.
The prices I quoted were from the Social Serve website for that specific property. The Social Serve website said there was a 2 bedroom available in addition to the 3 bedroom. The fair market value for the 3 bedroom is $910. I only posted the link to facebook to show that this was not a run down property but a very nice property in a great location.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 11:24 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,752 posts, read 4,385,485 times
Reputation: 10414
^^^

See above
 
Old 01-03-2016, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,583,592 times
Reputation: 16777
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rambler View Post
Oh man, are you ever in for a rough collision with the reality of life as a low income retiree in the US today. If you want a region with mild winters that pretty much means the red states in the southern part of the country. Red states outright hate the poor and they don't care what you may have done before you retired because now you are just another worthless old person who can make no contribution to society. Don't believe me? Try looking up housing assistance and medicare/medicaid in states like Alabama and Georgia. And before all the Southerners around here jump all over me, I'm originally from the South myself, so I know where-of I speak. I am disgusted by the bigotry and lack of compassion displayed all too often by my (once) fellow Southerners. I now live in Colorado for good reason.

Your other possibility might be southern California. It's warm there, and as far as I can tell they seem to try to help their low income residents more than many other states do. But I know very little about Cali, so I can't make many helpful suggestions about the towns there. But one thing you should keep in mind is that places with mild winters often have hot summers and global warming is for reals, like it or not. Elderly people who can't afford AC die in heat waves in this country every summer. So, it may come down to a choice of which is the lesser evil.

If you want to consider Colorado, I can tell you what its like here. Colorado's winters are actually not that bad as long as you stay away from towns in the high mountains which you'd be staying away from anyhow, since these towns are mostly over priced resorts and your rent would be more like $400/day - not a month. Colorado Springs might be a good fit for you. Housing prices there are very reasonable, and you might find a studio apartment for as low as $400/month. But even there, that $400/month is a real deal breaker for most everywhere you might want to live. Sounds to me that if $400 is all you can afford, you need to get busy searching for subsidized housing through the department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). HUD housing is not all sleazy projects the way some people think. HUD has some very nice apartments that they run for low income seniors in cities and towns all across the US. In fact, a major reason that I moved to my current town was because there was an opening in the senior apartments here. HUD keeps its housing for seniors immaculate and in excellent repair. People are not allowed to get away with stuff like making loud noise all night long or filling their studio apartment with 637 feral cats, etc., etc.

If its important to you to live in a climate more like the one you're coming from, and you're willing to deal with life below the Mason Dixon Line, google the words "HUD," "senior housing," and the name of the city you want - "Atlanta," for example, and you'll be rewarded with links to the websites of those housing authorities which manage these type apartments. I warn you that you'll have to do some searching and calling around (can you do that from the Philippines?), because congress in its vast wisdom has started withdrawing funding from all HUD programs. I guess the theory is that if us old people are all forced out on the streets we'll either die from hypothermia come winter and any survivors will be finished off by the 120 degree heat wave next summer. Bingo! Social (in)Security problem solved. However, at this point, if you make it your job to search for HUD senior housing everywhere you can think of, you'll probably luck into an opening the way I did. But hurry, cuz it's getting harder by the day. BTW, the senior apartments I moved to have informal get-to-gethers often where we don't dance (alas), but we did a lot of gossipping and card games, and even wine imbibing for those so inclined.

I am an advocate for low income and disabled people in Colorado, so if you wish, you can DM me with some more of the specifics of your situation and I can point you toward more precise places to get some help. I wish you the best of luck. I'm afraid you're going to need it.

Yours,
Rambler
Re Southern California.

In terms of subsidized housing, its one of the places the wait is long. Housing is very expensive. You'll find a lot more rooms for rent there than other places, with people bringing in a little extra money. They do give the food stamp amount in cash with SSI and I assume SS. You get medicade, but when I moved from there the services were continuing to shrink.

Some areas are not only very hot, but very smoggy. I had to move out of the Inland Empire since I was having too much trouble breathing. The smog would block out the mountains you could see off in the distance in the summer. It is also expensive, in comparison to other areas. Inland socal is hot during the summer, and its not unusual to have temps like 110. Its dry heat but its often smoggy dry heat.

I moved to Oklahoma, and a small town. My income went down, but my spending money went up since its cheaper to live. I'm not saying move to OK unless you check it out and choose to, but this area is one where costs are less across the board.

Also, if your trying for assistance from federal programs, they are easier to get into if you live in a less populated area. Many programs can take in a bugeted number of clients per year. You'll be one of them much sooner if you live where there is less competition.

Weather here is... different. It's currently 42. We had snow last week, and might have more next week. The temps in summer are not as hot as socal, but more humid so they feel hotter. You have to have ac for the cool air and cutting the humidity. But as someone who got where I couldn't breath with the smog in socal, I can live with that. The sky is BLUE here. I have allergy problems, but its treatable. You can't treat being short of breath from smog.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 01:36 PM
 
14,276 posts, read 24,038,486 times
Reputation: 20111
^^^


And you would be competing with a great number of college students for affordable housing. I do not remember what most of the Iowa students were paying for rent a few years ago but it was north of $600 a month.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,697 posts, read 17,660,009 times
Reputation: 27772
Quote:
Originally Posted by miczmehandl View Post
Yes ,if Indy, I'd be looking for a walkable area ,close to a good health club. Any suggestions?
You aren't going to find $400/month rent and walkable in Indy. You might be able to find something in Muncie, IN, which has Ball State University, but it's a decayed Rust Belt town.
 
Old 01-03-2016, 07:41 PM
 
20 posts, read 16,997 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deelighted View Post
Sorry but in my opinion, your reply is the standard BS that is spouted much too often by people who don't even try!

I recently moved to southeastern Arizona and had no problem at all in finding available low-income housing in not just one community but several. Yes, I am saying there were low-income apartments available for immediate rental!

Guess you consider southeastern Arizona the middle of nowhere but if you do, then you are making a huge mistake. Looking at the Social Serve website (for which I've already provided you a link), I found a 3 bedroom in Sierra Vista and rents range from $169 for 20% of income qualification to $460 for 40% of income qualification. As you'll see from the facebook page that I linked the 3 bedroom is available for immediate rental. Sierra Vista has +40K residents and a great hospital.

Quit assuming the worst and start doing some research yourself.
If you read my original post, it says medium to large city. Sierra Vista is a small town, not to be confused with a city. I'm from Arizona. The reason you have vacancies is that many people prefer a real city to a small town. How long is your applicaton. Most are like 10 pages long requiring tons of highly personal information. Ok, I will call your bluff, give me an email with a short note saying u have a vacancy and an application. I think your just advertising ur vacant units. Also I'm a single guy, so they are not going to rent me a large apt. What public transport they have there?
 
Old 01-03-2016, 07:56 PM
 
20 posts, read 16,997 times
Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sfcambridge View Post
You're asking a lot, and seem to be quite impatient.

Why not just get on a few waiting lists now, and work on your attitude a little. Many people are trying to help and have given you good suggestions here. Maybe you don't get your first choice when you first move back to the states.

Poor, educated and sick, and over 65 years old ...... and looking for a woman in her 40's-50's. Yeah....

Beggars cannot be choosers, my friend.
Actually, I'm not doing so bad here. I have a small two bedroom house, full time maid just 50 feet from the beach. I'm eating well, have had dates with 20-40 year old Filipinas with good attitudes in the last two years than I've had in my entire life in the us. If push comes to shove and I'm in the us, I can reenter my old profession and afford those ripoff rents renters are paying there but why bother? Btw ' my rent here is 195 a month, utils included. I did not say I had no money, I only implied I am not going to waste it on swag rents (stealing wout a gun). There is medical insurance here I might get. A doctor visit here is 7 dollars.

Last edited by miczmehandl; 01-03-2016 at 08:09 PM..
 
Old 01-03-2016, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,986 posts, read 3,478,991 times
Reputation: 10538
Good grief. People have gone way out of their way to help you & you are so negative. Wow.
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