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Old 01-05-2016, 09:18 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,677,570 times
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I came across the Sit Rise Test (SRT) this morning.

Being able to sit to a seated position on the floor and rise back up is a simple predictor of all-cause mortality and longevity. Hip, knee and back problems will exclude some from doing this, but for those who can, it's easy or maybe not so easy to do.

I scored a 6 and have work to do. Like drawing a face clock to check cognition/memory, this is a simple test to do at home. They do advise having a spotter if you aren't sure about your abilities.

There are several articles to be found on this, here's one:The Sitting-Rising Test: what’s your score? | Heart Sisters

And a video from YouTube for those who like visuals:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oQIbffQj2xM

Last edited by jean_ji; 01-05-2016 at 10:04 AM..
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Old 01-05-2016, 09:23 AM
 
71,794 posts, read 71,896,917 times
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i am in very good shape and can squat fairly large amounts of weight as well as run 4 miles every other day .

i can't seem to do this for anything .

guess i am a goner ha ha ha
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Old 01-05-2016, 09:32 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
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Here's more from a 2012 article from Prevention magazine: Simple Flexibility Test Might Predict Lifespan | Prevention

This quote from the article might explain why your having problems:
Quote:
So how does your ability to move from standing to sitting correlate with longevity? It’s all because your musculoskeletal fitness—your body flexibility, balance, muscle strength, and coordination—is an important indicator of your overall health, and has a favorable influence on life expectancy. “People tend to focus on aerobic exercise, which is important, but that should not be your only priority,” Araújo says.

Look, if you can’t pass the test with flying colors, don’t freak out. Instead, focus on improving your overall fitness and your flexibility.
And do notice the article title: Might predict lifespan. Add a yoga class at your gym maybe? If the flexibility doesn't improve your lifespan, it might have a good side effect in the bedroom.

Last edited by jean_ji; 01-05-2016 at 10:05 AM..
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Old 01-05-2016, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Close to an earthquake
890 posts, read 679,057 times
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Did it early in the morning when I was still stiff like a rodeo cowboy. Was able to do it without touching anything but had a little wobble on the standup. If I can remember, I'll try later in the day after a workout when I'm at my prime.
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Old 01-05-2016, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Idaho
1,456 posts, read 1,158,755 times
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Being of small frame and quite flexible, I can do this test easily and have no doubt that I can still do it 20/30 years from now as long as I don't have any broken bones or not being crippled by arthritis.

My husband has a much bigger frame with a bad ankle so there is no way that he could pass the test even in his youthful prime days.

I don't think that any single test can be a good predictor of mortality and longevity. Yes, there can be some correlation between physical strength, fitness and flexibility with health condition, but nobody can say that people who could not pass this 'simple' test is not strong, fit and flexible (bone structure and injuries are major contributing factors too) and likely to die early!

What about other medical factors affecting mortality and longevity like heart disease, diabetes and cancer? People can get perfect score on this test but with sky high cholesterol and A1C level. Cancer can strike anyone including trim, fit, strong athletes.

This is not to say that the test has no merits. Everybody should do their best to be strong, fit and as flexible as possible. Having a good core strength and agile can help to prevent injuries but I very much doubt that my mortality depends on my score.
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Old 01-05-2016, 10:07 AM
 
Location: middle tennessee
1,926 posts, read 994,079 times
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can somebody come over and help me up
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Old 01-05-2016, 10:31 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,441 posts, read 1,677,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
Being of small frame and quite flexible, I can do this test easily and have no doubt that I can still do it 20/30 years from now as long as I don't have any broken bones or not being crippled by arthritis.

My husband has a much bigger frame with a bad ankle so there is no way that he could pass the test even in his youthful prime days.

I don't think that any single test can be a good predictor of mortality and longevity. Yes, there can be some correlation between physical strength, fitness and flexibility with health condition, but nobody can say that people who could not pass this 'simple' test is not strong, fit and flexible (bone structure and injuries are major contributing factors too) and likely to die early!

What about other medical factors affecting mortality and longevity like heart disease, diabetes and cancer? People can get perfect score on this test but with sky high cholesterol and A1C level. Cancer can strike anyone including trim, fit, strong athletes.

This is not to say that the test has no merits. Everybody should do their best to be strong, fit and as flexible as possible. Having a good core strength and agile can help to prevent injuries but I very much doubt that my mortality depends on my score.
No it doesn't work for those with physical impairments that can't do it and it may not be a predictor for you, but for many not in good musculoskeletal-skeletal shape, trying this may be a wake up call for them. It's easy, doesn't require a doctors visit or battery of tests and can be a starting point towards better health, or at least the aspects of health that can be controlled or improved. It's one more tool to use, and I don't believe it was presented as the only one. Here's a quote from the researcher and it's a simple concept:

Quote:
In an interview via Skype from his home in Rio, he said the idea for SRT came from observing his older, sedentary patients who could pass basic aerobic tests.

"Many of them are able to bike or to run on a treadmill," said Dr. Araujo, "but if you asked them could you tie your shoes, it's pretty difficult to do that. We realized not only aerobic fitness is important. You also need other things for your life: strength, flexibility, balance."

The goal is to get down and back up from a sitting position with minimal support. It can be used in all age groups, and results are based on a scale of one to 10. Score three or less and your risk of dying is five times greater over the next five years.
Being in better physical shape will improve the odds of getting cancer, diabetes or coronary disease but isn't a predictor of those. My feeling is, if someone scores 1-3 (and have no physical impairments) on this test, they may well be on their way to these diseases.

Last edited by jean_ji; 01-05-2016 at 10:50 AM..
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Old 01-05-2016, 10:42 AM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,163,751 times
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Some cultures do lots of squatting and sitting on floors (e.g. Asian).

Others not so much.

This may mean innate advantages for some doing this test.
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Old 01-05-2016, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Near a river
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I could do 35 in a minute. The one about getting up from the floor without using your hands, forget it.
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Old 01-05-2016, 11:15 AM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,511 posts, read 14,350,116 times
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I've never been very flexible, wouldn't have been able to do this even as a youngster
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