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Old 01-07-2016, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,254 posts, read 4,139,840 times
Reputation: 15666

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
Different strokes for different folks.

I spent two weeks in Florida and it took me about 45 minutes to decide that Florida was not my cup of tea. We visited several communities that friends and family had recommended and pretty quickly decided that they were not what we were looking for.

And our original trips to Arizona which were mostly to Phoenix, we just as disappointing.

However, we ended up in green valley and found the community that we wanted to move to. There were certain concerns that we had at the time of the move (mostly surrounding the availability of adequate health care) that have been addressed.

As for allergens, I would say that being down here has eliminated about 90% of the allerdies. However, there are 3-4 days in February and March when a particular bush blooms that are very unpleasant.

Our initial trip was to Phoenix, but on our last day we headed down to Tucson and then Green Valley. My wife got out of the car and said this is it. She would stay there all year if she could, but we wound up moving back to Alaska while keeping the GV house as a winter home. We're in a smaller subdivision and we know all our immediate area neighbors and they're good about keeping an eye on our place. GV is definitely a great retirement area.
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Old 01-08-2016, 08:18 AM
 
6,368 posts, read 3,580,666 times
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We've lived in Florida for 10 years and came here for a job. My husband is retiring and we are moving back North soon. We are leaving Florida to be closer to our kids, grand kids, AND the weather.

People have made some very valid points. There is a major difference in the weather in North and South Florida. On any given day, there can be a 20 degree, plus more humidity, difference in say from Jacksonville to where we are in Naples.

To be happy living in Florida year round, you better be prepared to like HOT (90's) and humid weather from about May through October. I think a lot of people do not realize this. They only think about what the weather is like in the Winters. I have known a few people who were Snowbirds and then moved here year round. They were SHOCKED at how hot it was in the Summers. One woman said she could believe that it was in the mid 80's in November. Yep, not unusual. Then there is the HUMIDITY when you are near the coastline. That can be year round. Until we moved here, I just could not imagine it could still be humid with temps in the 60's!

Isn't all of this the major (weather) difference between Florida and Arizona? I know Arizona can get extremely hot also, but does it have Florida's humidity?
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Old 01-08-2016, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Austin
452 posts, read 292,166 times
Reputation: 623
Don't rule out San Antonio and South Texas. Also consider the Texas Hill Country west of Austin and San Antonio. If you have allergies, Austin is out. A lot of retirees in those areas. Take a look at Kerrville or Fredricksburg TX unless you want the big city. In that case, I'd suggest San Antonio or one of the cities in the Rio Grande Valley. Even El Paso.
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Old 01-08-2016, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Washington
31 posts, read 37,110 times
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Is anyone concerned about the water/drought issues in Arizona?

Arizona Could Be Out of Water in Six Years | Smart News | Smithsonian
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Old 01-08-2016, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Amongst the AZ Cactus
7,074 posts, read 4,923,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pashko View Post
Is anyone concerned about the water/drought issues in Arizona?

Arizona Could Be Out of Water in Six Years | Smart News | Smithsonian
We could ask the same question about Florida....is anyone concerned about water/drought issues in Florida?

Florida Faces Vanishing Water Supply : NPR

Will Florida


As for Arizona, no. Let's look at the facts. Probably an eye opener for many in regards to our water use:

Arizona water outlook not as dire as neighboring California - ABC15 Arizona

"In fact, despite growing from 1.1 million residents in 1957 to more than 6.5 million today, the state uses essentially the same amount of water."

Because:

"Arizona uses about 7 million acre feet of water a year, 70 percent of that for agricultural use, 22 percent for municipal use and the rest for industrial consumption. The state has nearly 9 million acre feet of water stored underground."

Farmer's will take the brunt of cutbacks in the future because that's where the big savings will be, if ever restrictions come into play based on what I've read. This makes logical sense. That is a big 70% cushion in a sense for AZ if such cutbacks are necessary.

Besides the Colorado river, AZ is fortunate to have large underground water supply's throughout the state(many untapped) and the Salt River system that fills reservoirs in our state. That's where we get the majority of our water from:

"The Colorado River provides 40 percent of the state's water through a 336-mile system of aquaducts that bring water to the Phoenix and Tucson metropolitan areas. Another 40 percent is pumped from underground and most of the rest comes from mountains that feed Arizona's river systems."

The Phoenix metro is very forward thinking on water management. The reality is perhaps one day, if weather and droughts continue for long periods of time, when the "easy water" is in shorter supply, there are other ways to keep the water flowing such as desalinization. And what orange county in California has been doing for some time now:

From toilet to tap: Drinking recycled waste water - CNN.com

The sky isn't falling people though I will agree that as time goes by, the easy/cheap water might be in shorter supply(there are many variables here of course, snow pack/rainfall a big one which so far is excellent this winter) and most states/the world will have to be creative in how to supply drinking water. This isn't an Arizona thing.....this is a nation/world wide thing, and that includes Florida.
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Old 01-08-2016, 11:58 AM
 
14,260 posts, read 23,991,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Our initial trip was to Phoenix, but on our last day we headed down to Tucson and then Green Valley. My wife got out of the car and said this is it. She would stay there all year if she could, but we wound up moving back to Alaska while keeping the GV house as a winter home. We're in a smaller subdivision and we know all our immediate area neighbors and they're good about keeping an eye on our place. GV is definitely a great retirement area.

We were here for about a week when my wife started looking at real estate in January 2014. Then, we scheduled ourselves to spend June in Green valley to see if we could survive the heat. Once we figured out how to do it, we made the permanent move. We are having a blast. my only complaint is that there is too much to do in the area and we have had to make some tough choices. (g)
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Old 01-08-2016, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,254 posts, read 4,139,840 times
Reputation: 15666
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
We were here for about a week when my wife started looking at real estate in January 2014. Then, we scheduled ourselves to spend June in Green valley to see if we could survive the heat. Once we figured out how to do it, we made the permanent move. We are having a blast. my only complaint is that there is too much to do in the area and we have had to make some tough choices. (g)
We also made a June trip to check out the heat. But what I found is that one week in June doesn't really prepare you for a full summer of heat! I agree there is too much to do. Sunday is my only free day when I'm down there. Summers will be much more bearable know that we moved back to Alaska, but we'll still enjoy the winters there.
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Old 01-08-2016, 02:58 PM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
22,592 posts, read 12,337,977 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
Seems like apples and oranges.
More like cactus and palm trees.
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Old 01-08-2016, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,929,938 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
More like cactus and palm trees.
. And note that for at least some of us - like me and my husband - and my brother and his wife - well we moved to Florida and Arizona respectively when we were younger. Because we all got good jobs where we moved. It is probably a lot different staying in a state where you've lived for a bunch of decades than moving to a new one when you retire.

I assume you're still in Philadelphia. Have you been there most of your adult life? Or did you move from elsewhere? Robyn
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Old 01-08-2016, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,929,938 times
Reputation: 6716
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevek64 View Post
We could ask the same question about Florida....is anyone concerned about water/drought issues in Florida?..
Yes. We have been on mandatory water restrictions in terms of things like residential irrigation for perhaps a decade+ now. We also have tiered water pricing here in NE Florida (the more you use - the more you pay per gallon - which is legal here in Florida but apparently illegal in some liberal states like California). There are regional conflicts within Florida. Us conservative folk up here in NE Florida have accepted this water stuff - grudgingly. But the more liberal folk down south not only won't accept these limits (they insist on their have to be watered every day impatiens) - they want us to divert the water we're saving to them too. So there is a lot of fighting within the state. Much like there is between Florida and Georgia these days when it comes to water.

BTW - the article you linked is from 2011 - when we were having a minor drought. The most recent major drought was in 1998-1999. Quite awful. There were lots of fires too. That's when we implemented most of our current water restrictions.

When I go to the Phoenix metro area - it seems to me like many older areas are wasteful when it comes to water - but newer areas aren't. Are there differences when it comes to water use/allowances/prices depending on when your place was built? Robyn
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