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Old 01-09-2016, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
14,628 posts, read 17,927,825 times
Reputation: 6716

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Quote:
Originally Posted by popcorn247 View Post
...Weather is very important to me, but I can dress more warmly if I want to go on a winter hike...
Having observed lots of people - including members of our family - as they get older - I am convinced that different people have different "thermostats". Like my BIL - who lives in Michigan - starts sweating when it's 60. I am wearing sweatpants when it's 60 because I'm cold .

And I am not as bad as some really old people I know - like my father - who keeps the heat turned up to close to 80 (and keeps the A/C set at that too). That is too warm for me (we do 72 in the winter - 76 in the summer) - but it seems like a lot of really old people lose their "cold proofing"/padding/insulation.

The worst may be when spouses have different thermostats - and they're debating about a place to live. I have a cousin in Wisconsin who is somewhat ok with the cold in Wisconsin in the winter. His wife is not. So they bought a house in Florida - and she spends more time there than he does.

Far from being a one size fits all thing - this is something I think every person has to look at from a personal POV when considering a move to a new climate at/in retirement.

On the other hand - I think it's safe to say that ice and the like aren't senior friendly. Because of the falls they can cause - and how susceptible we get to stuff like broken hips (not a good event) and their complications if we fall when we're older. Preventing falls is one of the most important safety things we can do as we age. Whether we're talking about falls outside due to ice - or falls inside due to things like tripping on area rugs. Robyn
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Old 01-09-2016, 04:30 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,430 posts, read 1,666,491 times
Reputation: 8663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robyn55 View Post
Having observed lots of people - including members of our family - as they get older - I am convinced that different people have different "thermostats". Like my BIL - who lives in Michigan - starts sweating when it's 60. I am wearing sweatpants when it's 60 because I'm cold .

And I am not as bad as some really old people I know - like my father - who keeps the heat turned up to close to 80 (and keeps the A/C set at that too). That is too warm for me (we do 72 in the winter - 76 in the summer) - but it seems like a lot of really old people lose their "cold proofing"/padding/insulation.

The worst may be when spouses have different thermostats - and they're debating about a place to live. I have a cousin in Wisconsin who is somewhat ok with the cold in Wisconsin in the winter. His wife is not. So they bought a house in Florida - and she spends more time there than he does.

Far from being a one size fits all thing - this is something I think every person has to look at from a personal POV when considering a move to a new climate at/in retirement.

On the other hand - I think it's safe to say that ice and the like aren't senior friendly. Because of the falls they can cause - and how susceptible we get to stuff like broken hips (not a good event) and their complications if we fall when we're older. Preventing falls is one of the most important safety things we can do as we age. Whether we're talking about falls outside due to ice - or falls inside due to things like tripping on area rugs. Robyn
We had/have no AC in NY; old house with radiators and a boiler, so central air is not an option. We were thinking about the Siemens split units before we bought the FL house. We have large trees that keeps the temperature lower, outside of a couple of days and we just deal with it up there.

The point is I have never lived with AC at home, only at work and I'm not a fan of it. We keep the FL house at 80 and lower the temp only for visitors/company. We have vaulted ceilings and 80 is comfortable for both of us, even sleeping. We do have ceiling fans in most rooms. We open windows below 80 and if the humidity is not oppressive. We are in our early sixties and like living with the temperature outside more than an artificial environment. I have no problems with the heat and humidity, I've lived with it in the summers all my life up north and while I appreciate and need AC in FL, I turn it off any chance I get.

I know there probably are not many people like us, the neighbor's up north tease us all the time on hot days and quite frankly don't understand why and how we do it. And for the record I loved snow and cold and could live in either climate. Longer days and more sunshine are more of a factor than temps for me. We've not turned the heat on yet and I really don't expect to because we are still cold tolerant and the sun warms up the house by mid morning when it is colder. I love FL and probably would love AZ too if it wasn't so far from family.

Last edited by jean_ji; 01-09-2016 at 04:44 PM..
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Old 01-10-2016, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,666 posts, read 3,241,188 times
Reputation: 11937
My personal internal thermostat is always set too high and there is not much I can do about it. To me, there is nothing more refreshing than stepping outside for a breath of fresh air and feel that cool air wash over me and cool me down. I'm not meant for living in the south.
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Old 01-10-2016, 03:05 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,751 posts, read 7,030,085 times
Reputation: 14260
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Arizona is a really bad choice for anyone with allergies. With the long warm season, it seems there is always a lot of pollen in the air. Some of the worst offenders such as Russian olive trees have been banned but Phoenix and other built up areas remain really bad with lots of different pollens.
I'm wondering if there is a place anywhere that's not bad for allergy sufferers? Its not so great here in Florida either. I'm told when someone moves to a different location with different flora and fauna, they may be better for a while if they get away from their allergens in their old location. But as soon as their immune system catches up with the allergens in the new location, their illnesses pop up again!
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Old 01-10-2016, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,721 posts, read 40,990,834 times
Reputation: 9205
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Arizona is a really bad choice for anyone with allergies. With the long warm season, it seems there is always a lot of pollen in the air. Some of the worst offenders such as Russian olive trees have been banned but Phoenix and other built up areas remain really bad with lots of different pollens.
That is far from true. There are many worse places for allergies than Arizona. Even though Phoenix has gotten worse with all the imported plants, it still rates pretty well compared to the worst locations, according to the following:

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America has produced lists of 100 cities in the US (I assume the largest cities, but am not sure) rating them according to which ones are worse for Spring and Fall allergies.

Spring Allergies: http://www.aafa.org/media/Spring-All...5-Rankings.pdf

Fall Allergies: http://www.aafa.org/media/Fall-Aller...-List-2015.pdf

Places that stand out to me positively, with warm climates are Tucson, AZ and San Diego, CA.
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Old 01-10-2016, 04:45 PM
 
1,075 posts, read 1,117,614 times
Reputation: 1416
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
My personal internal thermostat is always set too high and there is not much I can do about it. To me, there is nothing more refreshing than stepping outside for a breath of fresh air and feel that cool air wash over me and cool me down. I'm not meant for living in the south.
I am the same way. Do you live in North Carolina?
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Old 01-10-2016, 04:46 PM
 
2,626 posts, read 4,951,557 times
Reputation: 2224
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
My personal internal thermostat is always set too high and there is not much I can do about it. To me, there is nothing more refreshing than stepping outside for a breath of fresh air and feel that cool air wash over me and cool me down. I'm not meant for living in the south.
I am the same way.
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Old 01-11-2016, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,666 posts, read 3,241,188 times
Reputation: 11937
Quote:
Originally Posted by organic_donna View Post
I am the same way. Do you live in North Carolina?

I live in central New York state. I was thinking of moving to NC, but too many obstacles kept me from doing that. Money being #1.
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Old 01-11-2016, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,241 posts, read 4,136,323 times
Reputation: 15643
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal2NC View Post
I live in central New York state. I was thinking of moving to NC, but too many obstacles kept me from doing that. Money being #1.

More people are fleeing New York than any other state, except for New Jersey. I suspect cost of living is one of the primary factors.
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Old 01-11-2016, 12:42 PM
bUU
 
Location: Georgia
11,881 posts, read 8,658,776 times
Reputation: 8401
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
More people are fleeing New York than any other state, except for New Jersey. I suspect cost of living is one of the primary factors.
Could you please reference the statistics indicating that, for the specific population that you're considering? The only source that seemed to indicate what you're referring to was United Van Lines, presuming using their one way trips as a means of measurement. That doesn't seem like very reliable info, especially in light of the fact that West Virginia has actually lost population (the only US state to do so over the last five years, according to US Census projections). Maybe they just use another carrier, or their situation is so dire that they cannot afford to have professional movers.
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